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Wood Scavenging #8: Scavenging some turning blanks!

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Blog entry by Eric M. Saperstein posted 04-06-2013 02:57 AM 1049 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 7: Curiously Burl-ee?? Part 8 of Wood Scavenging series Part 9: The First Walnut Slabs are OUT of the Kiln! »

Along with scavenging for lumber – we are scavenging for turning blanks. We should probably post a little more on this subject as we are planning to do a ton of turning work this year. Our lathe upgrades are moving along we have the new 3HP 3phase motor and frequency drive, lots of new chucks, the bowl coring rig and hollowing tool cage is on order. We’re designing a new outrigger setup, etc.

SO – we’re starting a full force collection of materials to turn! We’ve picked up walnut, spalted maple, spalted beech, spalted cherry, osage orange, mulberry, looking for some cedar root balls.

Here’s a few images of local finds. These are mostly crotches, burls, and other cut outs from spalted logs. We’ll see what we get as time “turns” ... remember this is mostly found materials. We are buying a few logs here and there but the vast majority of this material is being picked up for FREE.

Scavenging and bartering is a woodworkers mainstay if you do it right. We gather supplies all over the place for unique projects. Wood turning can be done without sophisticated expensive milling equipment. All you need is a chainsaw, a bandsaw, and a lathe. Help a neighbor with a tree cleanup and you can end up with tons of great turning materials. Especially if you find trees that have spalt in them or unique mineral stains.

This is the root ball from our heirlom spalted copper beech – my grandmother’s tree. This was the final straw, I ordered the One-Way EZ Core setup today. I can’t waste this. I hope to get at least three bowls out of it.

This – this is found in our back yard a fallen cherry tree. We’ll be cutting up more of it ASAP! Probably this weekend! This unique blank became the turning below. We’re thin walling it out and we’ll finish sand it this weekend and let it sit and warp from there before finishing.

-- Eric M. Saperstein, Master Craftsman www.artisansofthevalley.com



6 comments so far

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7192 posts in 2056 days


#1 posted 04-06-2013 03:09 AM

your grandmothers tree looks so awesome , cant wait to see what you get from it, enjoy turning all of this beautiful wood..

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5371 posts in 1595 days


#2 posted 04-06-2013 05:46 AM

See you have a worx saw what do you do with it? Hope the projects give great results.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Eric M. Saperstein's profile

Eric M. Saperstein

766 posts in 2001 days


#3 posted 04-06-2013 11:01 AM

Mike bought that one, friend from high school who I teamed up with in the shop. It actually works quite nice. He wanted a saw that he didn’t have to mess with always having issues starting and we needed something we could use inside the shop in the winter. Plenty of power, very thin bar, works nice. It cuts like a descent mid sized chainsaw.

We have a very small echo saw setup as a carver, we had a mid sized Husky but somehow my uncle killed it we need a new mid-size saw for trim work; just a lighter one in the field. The echo is really setup purely for carving so we don’t take it out of the shop much. Then I have that big 71cc Johnsred behind the pile THAT has earned its keep!!! A little scary sometimes but that power and depth of cut is amazing.

-- Eric M. Saperstein, Master Craftsman www.artisansofthevalley.com

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5371 posts in 1595 days


#4 posted 04-06-2013 05:04 PM

Thanks Eric,

Looked for an echo as it seems to be a professional saw. Around here and on amazon, Husqvarna seems to be top dog, maybe better profit margin? Before I knew better I bought a craftsman chainsaw and cut down a tree on my property, also used to trim one of my walnut trees in an emergency.

The craftsman was serviced and then I couldn’t get the saw started? LOL! Later I took it through the maintenance steps and still nothing. Bought the 18” Worx and used it to cut down a nuisance tree I’d let grow due to other stuff. Worked great. The mechanic who did service on a new mower looked at it , primed it and it started????

Even though I’m getting woosier as I get older, (use to be able to carry a sheet of sheet rock, now I need a carrier?) I’m fantasizing using a chainsaw mill at our local landfill sight as there are some nice cut tree pieces there. Had also thought about a rip blade for the Worx, but can’t find one?

Nice to have a partner when you’re cutting lumber.

Look forward to your tree to furniture journey!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Eric M. Saperstein's profile

Eric M. Saperstein

766 posts in 2001 days


#5 posted 04-07-2013 02:27 AM

Echo is a descent saw, we had a big twin cylinder one YEARS ago, actually that’s the beast I learned on. It lasted a good 20 years. Our carving saw is an echo also as I mentioned.

We had a Husky IDK probably 10-12 years before its demise.

I bought the Johnsered 71cc just as an angry overkill sized saw for doing stuff at my hunting club and I got more into the idea of harvesting logs. Took some getting used to to handle it but it’s a great machine.

The Worx – I remain pleasantly surprised. I have never liked an electric saw before this one. We have a small electric on a trimmer pole, but it’s underpowered. Typical electric. This one – cuts like a gas saw. ... I don’t know about a rip blade for it.

Craftsman and I think Homelite and a few others are all cheap saws. They work, but otherwise – eh. They are not designed for industrial use.

Stihl is also a good machine.

I have been using a “pro” chain now on the Johnsered and both ripping and cross cutting – no issues. The Worx likewise whatever chain came with it seems to go both directions fine. That’s normal use though, not on a mill.

Whatever you use, it can get you a supply for many uses. I walked out in the woods again behind the shop and cut out about 5 cherry crotches from that tree w/ the spalt in it. I’ll get the rest for firewood later. I have a few more sections on that tree to go through and take joint areas. We have a 1/2” resaw blade on our bandsaw now (again another machine – we have two … but we need like 5 of them!!) ... so that made very quick work of the soft cherry to turn it into blanks.

Then I just take them on the jointer, and yeah of course we have the stupid guard removed (not that for liability reasons I am endorsing that but …) ... I swing it across one side and then spin the blank and a few passes like that it evens it out nicely to put a plate on.

I just bought 8 more plates, and they are mostly all in use. I’ll probably order another 8 of them shortly. That was 2, 3, 4, & 6 inches. I only have one big one, I want 2-3 more of the big ass heavy ones too.

-- Eric M. Saperstein, Master Craftsman www.artisansofthevalley.com

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5371 posts in 1595 days


#6 posted 04-07-2013 04:47 AM

Thanks! Appreciate your opinion…...

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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