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19 foot Offshore Power Dory Build #12: Finishing Topsides and Painting

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Blog entry by English posted 06-05-2015 09:23 PM 3783 reads 0 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 11: Closing up the decks, Getting the Rigging Ready. Part 12 of 19 foot Offshore Power Dory Build series Part 13: Finished Painting and trimming out Boat »

I have 558 hours in this build and the boat weighs 1421 lbs.

It has been over a month since I updated the blog. I have been working on finishing the topsides of the boat to get it ready to paint. In my last blog I had all the topside built except for the splash well. So my next job was to mix up thickened epoxy and fill screw holes and seams.

While I was working on sanding thickened epoxy I removed the pilot house inside panels and my wife glassed them on saw horses.

After sanding all of the thickened epoxy smooth, I proceeded with fiber-glassing the topsides, here I am fiber-glassing the dash

Next the roof gets glassed down onto the sides.

Then windshield was glassed.

Then I glassed in the cabin hatch frame.

I continued on with adding fiberglass next was the pilot house side panels.

Glass from the cabin roof is turned up on the bottom of the windshield.

Then glass the other side of the pilot house.

Inside panels of the pilot house are reinstalled and the glass is trimmed on the dash.

Fiberglass is applied to the cabin pilot house wall.

After all of the topside are glassed then all of the glass laps has the edges feathered and sanded down to the top of the fabric before adding fill coats of epoxy.

First Fill coat of epoxy have been applied.

Next is was time to build the motor splash-well. I had left this off because I was using the notch in the transom to access the boat.

Thickened epoxy used to fill screw holes and seams and filets made for the inside corners.

Second and third fill coats applied to topsides

Topside fiberglass sanded smooth.

Next I applied fiberglass to the splash well.

A epoxy filet is added around the under the roof.

Its time to install the Bow Eye. Here in this picture you can see where I bored through the plywood and glass from inside, The holes in the stem were drilled on the drill press before I installed the stem to the frame.

I have a had a time locating a bow eye that was long enough the reach through my stem. The stem is a 2×8 with two layers of 3/4” plywood lapped over the stem. This makes for an almost 9” thick stem. Standard bow eyes are 4” to 6 ”. After searching the internet for months I finally ran across a bow eye from a company in Fort Wayne, but they only sold wholesale. I put in a PM to our fellow Lumberjock Bob Current. Bob was able to aquire the Bow eye and shipped it to me. Thanks Bob!!!

As you can see this is a long Bow Eye

The bow eye front plate was wider than the rounded front of the boat.

I marked the area that needed to be changed.

Here is the area after it was flattened and then Fiber-glassed with two layers of fiberglass.

After I got the Bow eye holes fixed correctly I was able to get the boat primed. I put on two coats of High Build Rustoleum Marine Fiberglass Primer. Then I sanded this down smooth to get the orange peel feel off that the roller left.

All of the dash and inside pilot house panels have been glassed, primed, and painted.

This is after two coats of Rustoleum Marine Navy Blue Topside paint. This is the most forgiving paint I have ever used. You just roll it on. It self levels and drys to an almost buffed look. You can see yourself is the side of the boat.

I am going to a family reunion this weekend, but next week I will need to add one more coat of paint and then I can start installing all of the devices that penetrate the hull. Cleats, Bilge pump discharges, Fuel fill fittings, fuel tank vent, and others. After all of these are in I can close up the deck sides and start installing the rigging, finish the wiring and get on the white oak trim.

Thanks for Looking!!

-- John, Suffolk Virgina



16 comments so far

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2798 days


#1 posted 06-05-2015 09:45 PM

Wow, that is one nice boat. I can imagine there is a lot of hours in it. Looks like excellent work too.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View htl's profile

htl

2206 posts in 623 days


#2 posted 06-05-2015 11:22 PM

Now that is one nice boat your building.
Would have loved one like it back when I was diving.
It would made one great dive boat.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View scott0317's profile

scott0317

53 posts in 920 days


#3 posted 06-06-2015 12:45 AM

amazing, simply amazing. can’t imagine the time invested. I would love to see a video of the lauch party and any pictures up to that point. I will be watching this til completeion.

-- I've almost got all the tools I need, almost.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7172 posts in 2262 days


#4 posted 06-06-2015 12:52 AM

You are doing everything about as well as it could be done John. I wouldn’t have glassed any interior areas but having done so can’t hurt. You have put in a ton of work but when she “come to life” it will all be a memory and all that will remain will be your fine vessel and the knowledge that you built her with your own hands…..... there’so no better feeling.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1637 days


#5 posted 06-06-2015 02:06 AM

The boat is looking good.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View lightweightladylefty's profile

lightweightladylefty

3138 posts in 3177 days


#6 posted 06-06-2015 04:48 AM

John,

Your thoroughness is simply amazing. To have a finish so glossy, it has to be perfect, and yours looks perfect! You’re getting close now!

L/W

-- Jesus is the ONLY reason for ANY season.

View Daruc's profile

Daruc

459 posts in 597 days


#7 posted 06-06-2015 04:58 AM

The boat is absolutely amazing.
You can see by the finish that excellent skilled craftsmanship has gone into it.
What I want to know is where you do the work? You must be taking it out, and doing it somewhere else because I didn’t see a speck of sawdust on the floor in any of those pictures. :)

Well done Sir.

-- -

View English's profile

English

517 posts in 941 days


#8 posted 06-06-2015 09:58 AM

Woodust,

I do work on it in that small space, the boat is on furniture dollies. I have to move it from side to side to work around it. As for the floor, it is covered with epoxy, fiberglass, and paint from this project. I do vacuum up the dust after each wood working task. I try to keep the dust out of the finishes. It will take a week after the boat moves out to clean up that space.

-- John, Suffolk Virgina

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7798 posts in 2768 days


#9 posted 06-06-2015 04:47 PM

ive been waiting for this, wow, this is fantastic, i was wanting the paint to be on…still much to do, but its coming down to the wire, great job…

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View Daruc's profile

Daruc

459 posts in 597 days


#10 posted 06-06-2015 04:58 PM



Woodust,

I do work on it in that small space, the boat is on furniture dollies. I have to move it from side to side to work around it. As for the floor, it is covered with epoxy, fiberglass, and paint from this project. I do vacuum up the dust after each wood working task. I try to keep the dust out of the finishes. It will take a week after the boat moves out to clean up that space.

- English

Yes I thought so.
I’m not sure how it came across, but that was a compliment to your self discipline.
I admire and envy your organization to complete those tasks in such a small space.

-- -

View changeoffocus's profile

changeoffocus

457 posts in 1081 days


#11 posted 06-07-2015 02:30 PM

John,
Outstanding, your attention to detail is a solid 10. I’m most impressed in this chapter by your being able to Shanghai your wife to do fiberglass of all things.
Add me to the list of those waiting to see the launching chapter.
Bob

View Adam's profile

Adam

37 posts in 1693 days


#12 posted 06-10-2015 01:04 AM

John, very nice build. A boat is the top of my woodworking bucket list, so watching your build is hugely instructional. Thank you for sharing, and I hope you have many enjoyable hours in the water when it’s finished!

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

2327 posts in 1891 days


#13 posted 06-10-2015 01:06 AM

Only someone who has been involved in the building of a boat knows how many hours it takes to get it done and into the water. I give you every encouragement to keep going you are almost there…....

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7798 posts in 2768 days


#14 posted 06-10-2015 01:38 PM

hey john, if i remember your going to power this with a 75 horse, what type of engine is it, and do you have it ready, are there any pictures of the outboard yet…am i getting the horse before the cart….lol…this is so very exciting, i wish i could be there the day you launch it, just so i could see the smile on your face when you fire it up…now one more question, what is the name going to be, is it a her or him…or what…lol…

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View English's profile

English

517 posts in 941 days


#15 posted 06-10-2015 07:44 PM

Bob,

I purchased a 70 hp Yamaha 4 stroke a few months ago while a big promotion was going on. I haven’t picked it up yet. Once I get the boat onto the trailer I will take it to the Yamaha Dealer and he will install and test the motor and the wiring to the gauges.

As for the name, My brother was a US Navy Captain, He retired 10 years ago. Four years later he developed kidney cancer and passed away two years ago. He also was a big woodworker he had a 28×36 two story shop. I have inherited a lot of his tools. I always discussed my projects with him, he was my woodworking mentor. Every time I go out to my shop to work on my boat I feel his presence. He would have been so excited about this project. So I have named my boat ” Big Brother” in his honor. I know that he will be with me every time I take it out.

-- John, Suffolk Virgina

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