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19 foot Offshore Power Dory Build #4: Installing Plywood Planking on Sides

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Blog entry by English posted 01-27-2015 11:34 PM 3573 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Fairing the Frame Part 4 of 19 foot Offshore Power Dory Build series Part 5: Installing Bottom Plywood Planking »

I now have 105 hours in the build and the boat weight is 622 lb. I have been weighing each piece as it is installed.

I know I said at the end of the last blog segment that I was done with the frame, but I have decided to install a under deck fuel tank. So before I can install the plywood I need to add a little structural support for the tank. I used a router and made several recesses in two of the frames to hold a section of 2” x 4”. I put in 4 of these.

Finished frame recess for fuel tank support.

Finished frame recess for fuel tank support.

Four fuel tank supports installed with epoxy.

Now we can get on with the plywood planking. I started with the transom with the plywood installation.

Plywood is sized about 1 ” bigger than the transom. I put epoxy on both the plywood and the transom frame. Then clamped it in place and screwed it with #8×1 1/2” Stainless Steel deck screws.

Transom Plywood is 5/8” Douglas Fir installed with epoxy and SS deck screws and trimmed to fit with a Router using a flush trim bit. The top in the picture was planed with a block plan to the angle needed to match the bottom of the boat.

This is the router and bit used to trim the transom.

Next I clamped a sheet of 1/2” Douglass Fir Marine Plywood to the frame Starting at the bow.

same sheet from another angle..

While the sheet was on the frame I got inside the frame and marked all of the frame members touching the sheet of plywood. I used a compass and marked the edge 1/2” larger than the frame and I cut the sheet by the outer lines.

When I installed the cut sheet of plywood to the frame and started clamping down tight. The face veneer started splintering, cracking and popping. I almost panicked. I PM’ed Paul (Shipwright) We discussed several solutions. When I went back to the shop, I did some investigating, After investigating I found that a 8” section of one of the frames exactly where the splintering was occurring was not faired correctly. This picture shows the issue. The ruler is the plane the plywood will be in.

Here the first sheet is put back on the frame to test fit after the fairing is corrected.

This is the same panel, the two 2” x 4” x 8’ board are used to flatten the sheet of plywood, it was bowed due to the compound bends.

The starboard side of the boat with all three sheets of plywood test fitted and ready for epoxy and screws.

The first side with the plywood epoxied and screwed in place.

First sheet installed on the port side of the boat. The wet looking spot on the plywood is epoxy. I had a problem on this side too with splintering and cracking of the face veneer. I checked the fairing on this side before I started it was good. There appears to be a little more bend at frame 10 on this side. Looks like the chine log was weak at this frame and bent different than the one on the starboard side. The wet epoxy stopped the splintering immediately and once it cures it will strengthen the fiber of the wood so there will not be a problem.

I want to thank Paul (shipwright) for all his support on this project. It is so great that this community provides access to so much support for it’s member by the members. Thanks again Paul.

A close up picture of the face veneer damage.

Here is a look at the beginning of a butt joint for splicing two sheets of plywood together. The backer plywood is the same thickness and 6” wide. It is epoxied and screwed in place.

I noticed after I had finished installing the plywood on the starboard side of the boat that I had inadvertently pulled the frame out of level while installing the plywood. The front of the boat from frame 9 forward twisted and was about 1” out of level. When I installed the first sheet of plywood on the port side I used three pipe clamps and pulled the frame back to level and the first sheet of plywood is holding it there.

Second and third sheet of plywood installed on the port side.

A look from the front with all side plywood installed. Now I have to trim these sheets and get ready to put the bottom on the boat. You may have noticed that the sides of this boat are very tall. They average 40”. This boat is designed to handle surf launches and recoveries. The high sides will keep the surf out. The boat will also have a self bailing deck.

On the next segment I will be fairing the side plywood even with the top of the chine logs to get eady for bottom planking and installing the bottom plywood planking.

Thanks for looking.

-- John, Suffolk Virgina



4 comments so far

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2853 posts in 2696 days


#1 posted 01-27-2015 11:40 PM

I really like your project, but I gotta tell ya this…You need a bigger bote! :-)

I have been offshore out of Galveston and Freeport, Tx a few times. Some days, even a thirty footer will get ya beat up. :-(

Not too bad if you can pick your days and stay close. I did take my 21 footer out 20 miles or so, but we had a buddy boat and the day was slick as glass. And hot as all get outs! :-(

Good luck with your build.
Mike

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View English's profile

English

517 posts in 942 days


#2 posted 01-28-2015 12:15 AM

Thanks Mike,

I don’t plan to ever take it out past the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel. I may travel down the inter-coastal waterway to Nags Head, But that will be it. I chose a boat with the high sides because of the big ship traffic in Hampton Roads Harbor.

-- John, Suffolk Virgina

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shipwright

7173 posts in 2263 days


#3 posted 01-28-2015 12:46 AM

Nice work.
I’m always happy to help anyone building a boat. You’re very welcome.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2853 posts in 2696 days


#4 posted 01-28-2015 12:47 AM



Thanks Mike, I don t plan to ever take it out past the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel. I may travel down the inter-coastal waterway to Nags Head, But that will be it. I chose a boat with the high sides because of the big ship traffic in Hampton Roads Harbor.

- English

Thanks John. Looking forward to following your build.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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