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19 foot Offshore Power Dory Build #3: Fairing the Frame

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Blog entry by English posted 01-16-2015 09:27 PM 3308 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Continuing with the boat frame Part 3 of 19 foot Offshore Power Dory Build series Part 4: Installing Plywood Planking on Sides »

Now I have both Sheer Clamps installed and epoxied into the frame. That’s the last frame member.

Frame is now complete!! All Frame pieces installed!! Frame Eleven is still a little off, I will have to fair it out.

Along the way I made a few bad cuts. Here I cut too deep and at the wrong angle, So I made a shim 8” long and epoxied it in to correct the problem I made the shim 8” long and epoxied it to both the chine log and the frame. At 8” it won’t split when the mounting screws goes through.

Shim from another angle..

Still another angle on the shim..

After I installed the first Sheer Clamp I opened the garage door stepped outside and noticed that the stem had been pulled to the starboard side by 2”. So I used a pipe clamp and pulled it back. Then as I was installing the other Sheer Clamp I noticed that the first frame from the stem was collapsing under the pressure of the two Sheer Clamps. So I added a temporary brace to hold it out. I will have to put something permanent here when the boat is turned over to hold it out. the new brace will be part of the cabin framing.

Now on to the fairing process.

This will have to be faired off level with the keelson.

This also..

All of the side frames will be faired to match the angle the chine and sheer have as they pass the frame.

Fairing the side frames.

Fairing the keelson This board had a slight twist. I bought this board in one piece 24’ and cut it to the 17’ needed.

I added a 2” x 4” board to the side of the stem to give me more area to attach the plywood to at the stem. Most of this board was faired away.

A look at the stem with the new thickening boards from the front.

Fairing the side frames, I used several planes and sanders for this job.

Picture of a well faired side frame. The face of the frame matches the angle of the sheer clamp.

Another picture showing the side frame fairing.

Fairing is complete. I plan to go back now and add some thickened epoxy to fill in some of the bad cuts below the water line…

I mixed some thickened epoxy and went back and filled the bad cuts below the water line. This seals this end grain so if water gets in it will not soak it up so fast.

Thickened epoxy fills bad cuts. I used the saw dust in my shop vac separator from the fairing sanding to make the thickened epoxy.

I also filled the gaps on the new stem thickening boards with the thickened epoxy.

Frame Fairing is complete.. Next is plywood installation…

Here is a Video of the completed frame. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=quFSCvMspCg

I went and got my 1/2” Douglas fir Marine Plywood today for the sides and the transom. I had to order the 5/8” Marine plywood needed for the bottom. It will be in next week.

I am working by myself so installing the plywood should present a few challenges. I am at 84 hours now.

Thanks for looking!!

-- John, Suffolk Virgina



8 comments so far

View changeoffocus's profile

changeoffocus

457 posts in 1082 days


#1 posted 01-17-2015 12:40 AM

John,
This is a neat project, I just happened to find it. I’ll follow this through, this is quite the undertaking.
Keep up the good work.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7173 posts in 2263 days


#2 posted 01-17-2015 12:44 AM

Looking good John.
Will you be scarfing the plywood or using backing doublers under butt joints?
You will have a fine vessel here and it will give you a great feeling to know that you built her with your own hands.
Good work.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View English's profile

English

517 posts in 942 days


#3 posted 01-17-2015 12:58 AM

Paul,

I plan to use backing doublers on the side planking and the side to side joints on the bottom planking. There will be one joint down the 16’ of the length of the boat over the keelson. Using the keelson for the joint backer. I plant to use 6” fiberglass over each joint, then two layers of 6oz cloth over the entire hull.

Thanks

-- John, Suffolk Virgina

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7173 posts in 2263 days


#4 posted 01-17-2015 01:29 AM

An 8:1 scarf with epoxy will be as strong as the rest of the plywood and need no backer at all but, even if you do use a backer a simple scarf, something like 4:1 maybe, will stop the joint from telegraphing to the surface. A plain butt will telegraph. It will have the structural strength alright, just thinking of the appearance. I never use backers in plywood, just 8:1 scarfs.
This blog post might help show it.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View English's profile

English

517 posts in 942 days


#5 posted 01-17-2015 01:41 AM

Paul,

I would love to do scarf joints down the sides where it would show, but I am building this boat by my self. No help. I don’t think that I can handle a 21’ by 42” piece of 1/2” plywood. Can you fit up and glue the scarfs on the boat one piece at a time?

-- John, Suffolk Virgina

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7173 posts in 2263 days


#6 posted 01-17-2015 02:09 AM

Yes, when I built the Harbour Ferries the top sides were one piece of continuous plywood from port bow to stbd bow with a round stern. I installed the sides first and then scarfed in the curved stern in place to complete the continuous piece.
Seems I have a blog for everything. This one covers that job.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View canoecraig's profile

canoecraig

10 posts in 1241 days


#7 posted 01-23-2015 01:50 AM

Looks like you have a great project going, how are the Spira plans? I have been looking at the sailing sharpie plans, and don’t want to waste money.

View English's profile

English

517 posts in 942 days


#8 posted 01-23-2015 02:09 AM

Canoecraig, The plans give you all of the dimensions for each frame and the spacing for all the parts. On the Spira International site, Jeff Spira has a page called reports. Here he has put building guides for both plywood on frame boats and Stitch and Glue boats. Between the guides and the plans you have all the information you need to build the boat. I have been getting a lot of advice from Paul (shipwright) from this site. I also have emailed questions to Jeff Spira and he answers in a day or two. If you look thru the reports section you will find other post about things like how to build a scarf joint. So it’s all there you just have to look.

-- John, Suffolk Virgina

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