LumberJocks

Bandsaw upgrades #1: How to rewire a Grizzly G0555 Bandsaw

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Elizabeth posted 07-31-2011 05:20 AM 3572 reads 2 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Bandsaw upgrades series Part 2: Dust collection challenge, part 1 »

This weekend I successfully completed the task of rewiring my Grizzly 14” G0555 bandsaw from 110v to 220v. I had a lot of questions before I started, so I thought it might be nice to write a blog tutorial for others who might be interested in doing this.

Background: I am a mechanical engineer by training with very little electrical experience – only what they forced us to take in college, which was mostly theory and over ten years ago now. Before starting this project I asked for advice on the LJ forums and got a lot of good suggestions. In particular, I would like to thank Jim Bertelson and Grandpa for their patience in answering multiple questions!

NOTE: This tutorial does NOT cover installation of a 220v outlet for your bandsaw to plug into. If you do not already have a properly installed and wired 220v plug for your bandsaw and you are not an electrician, hire an electrician to put it in for you. And if you’re having an electrician round anyway, it might be worth having him or her do the saw!

There’s a long way to do this rewiring and a short way. It depends on whether or not you want to keep using the existing 16 gauge wire that is on your saw. If you do, then this will be a 15 minute job. I couldn’t, because the cord would not have reached to the location of the 200v plug. Upon advice from some knowledgeable people here on LJ I opted to use 14 gauge cord in this project. This required a lot more work, but I got there in the end. I do not know whether it is safe to run a bandsaw on 220v using 16 gauge cord. Check with an expert before doing this.

Here are the instructions for the “short way” – keeping the existing 16 gauge cord.

Materials required:

Phillips Head Screwdriver
Electrical Tape
Wire Cutter/stripper
15 Amp 220v plug which matches your socket shape
Permanent Marker that will show on black tape

Before starting any of this, make sure your bandsaw is UNPLUGGED. Shouldn’t have to say it, but I will anyway.

We’ll start with attaching the 200v plug to your cord. Cut the old 110v plug off of your cord. Strip the outer casing of your cord back about two inches. You’ve got three wires inside – probably green, black and white. Green is ground. Your 220v plug has three attachment points where you can screw down a wire between two metal plates. One of these screws is green. That’s where the green wire goes. The black and white wires go in each of the other two spots – it doesn’t matter which.

First, thread the whole cord through the hole in the bottom half of the plug assembly. On each wire, strip back the insulation a few millimeters. You are aiming to have the insulation butt up against the screw plates without being actually inside them. If you misjudge the length, it’s OK, just cut the copper wires and/or insulation and try again.

Insert each set of wires into a screw-plate and screw them down. It’s easiest to insert them all at once and then carefully screw down one at a time without moving the others. Once you’ve done all three, reassemble the plug casing. You want to aim to have the outer insulation be the only thing visible when you’ve completed the plug assembly. If you’ve cut it back too far, as I did on my first try, you’ll want to disassemble everything, cut the three wires a bit shorter, and try again.

Once you’ve completed this step, you’re halfway done! Next, we need to change the orientation of the four wires coming from the motor. These are labelled 1, 2, 3 and 4, which you will see when you remove the screw from the motor box and open it up.

There are also three wires coming from your cord – white, black, and green. Green is ground and is attached to the back of the wire box – you don’t have to worry about this one. When it’s wired as 110v, the 1 and 2 motor wires are connected to the black cord wire, and the 3 and 4 motor wires are connected to the white cord wire. Start by removing the electrical tape and prying off the two orange caps. It’s better to pull them straight rather than twist them, though it does take a bit of force. I used a plastic bottle cap for some leverage. Once they are off, you can see that the wires were twisted together inside the caps.

Take wires 2 and 3, twist them lightly together so all of the ends are as close together as you can arrange them, then take the spare orange cap that was taped inside the wire box and put it on top of the wires. Twist the cap clockwise and the wires will slowly twist together and jam inside the cap.

Put some electrical tape on the outside. Then do the same with wire 1 and the black cord wire, and finally with wire 4 and the white cord wire. You should now have three sets of wires, all capped and taped. Double check your results against the wiring diagram inside the wire box.

Close up the box, and cover the “110” label on the outside with electrical tape. Write “220” on it instead.

Congratulations, you’re done! Make sure your on/off switch is still off (in case you jostled it), then plug in your bandsaw, and carefully turn it on to test it. Happy sawing!

—————————————————————————————————————————

Here are the instructions for the “long way” – replacing the cord with 14 gauge

Materials required:

Phillips Head Screwdriver
Flathead Screwdriver
Electrical Tape (cost under $1)
Wire Cutter/stripper
Needlenose pliers
15 Amp 220v plug which matches your socket shape (cost about $6)
Permanent Marker that will show on black tape
Wire Crimper (cost about $10)
Minimum of three 14 gauge Ring Terminals (22 pack cost about $2)
Minimum of four 14 gauge Spade Terminals (20 pack cost about $2)
Plastic 14 gauge wire guide to replace the 16 gauge one on the back of your saw (cost 21 cents)
14 gauge wire, 3 foot length (cost $3)
14 gauge wire, minimum 8 foot length, size to reach your wall plug location. I used 11 feet. (Cost about $11)
Dremel-type tool with a bit that will grind away plastic
A great deal of patience

The materials that I needed to purchase are shown with prices above. I spent about $35 on materials. An electrician quoted me $135 to do the job, materials included. I also spent about four hours doing this and had to go to hardware stores three times – would have been once if I’d known everything I needed at the start and if the first one had had the 14 gauge cord I wanted, though. If you have never done a project like this and your time and gas is worth more than $100 to you, I recommend that you hire an electrician to do it. But if you are up for a challenge and want to learn more about wiring, go for it!

Before starting any of this, make sure your bandsaw is UNPLUGGED. Shouldn’t have to say it, but I will anyway.

We’ll start with the easy part – attaching the 200v plug to your cord. First, thread the whole cord through the hole in the bottom half of the plug assembly. Strip the outer insulation of your 14 gauge cord back about two inches. You’ve got three wires inside – probably green, black and white. Green is ground. Your 220v plug has three attachment points where you can screw down a wire between two metal plates. One of these screws is green. That’s where the green wire goes. The black and white wires go in each of the other two spots – it doesn’t matter which.

On each wire, strip back the insulation a few millimeters. You are aiming to have the insulation butt up against the screw plates without being actually inside them. If you misjudge the length, it’s OK, just cut the copper wires and try again.

Insert each set of wires into a screw-plate and screw them down. It’s easiest to insert them all at once, then carefully screw down one at a time without moving the others. Once you’ve done all three, reassemble the plug casing. You want to aim to have the outer insulation the only thing visible when you’ve completed the plug. If you’ve cut it back too far, as I did on my first try, you’ll want to disassemble everything, cut the three wires a bit shorter, and try again.

Since we’re replacing the entire cord, we next need to remove the on/off switch box from the side of the saw. Make note of the three screws – the one on the top right is a ground.

Remove these three screws to release the entire box, then remove the front of the on/off switch via the two black screws. (In the photos, I did those two steps in the opposite order.) Take a look at that tangle of wires in there – you’re going to become very familiar with the inside of this box today.

Make note of which wire is going where – two greens to grounding points, two whites to the ON switch and two blacks to the OFF switch. Disconnect all of these wires. There are two large black strain relief set screws at the bottom of this box. Use your flathead screwdriver to remove them.

You don’t need to cut off all those wire ends if you don’t want to. Remove the clear plastic insulation pieces and the wires should be able to slide out of the box intact. Slide one end of each of your two pieces of 14 gauge cord into the box in their place. Feed extra cord through for now so you have space to work.

You will spend a lot of time working on this box. It’s difficult to get the larger 14 gauge wire to fit underneath the switch properly. However, it can be done. This is where your patience will be most needed. It’s the first, and harder, of the two “hardest parts” of this project.

Strip back each wire’s outer cord insulation about three or four inches. Also strip the insulation on each individual wire (you’ve got six) a couple of millimeters. Like on the wall plug, you don’t want to go too far. Crimp ring terminals onto the two green wires, and spade terminals onto each of the white and black wires – a total of four spade terminals.

Reconnect your ground wires to the back of the box, which is metal.

Connect the two white wires to either side of the ON switch and the two black wires to either side of the OFF switch. Remember that the OFF side is closer to the bottom of the box, where the black wires stick out. I forgot that that end was the bottom, and started to wire it up backward (shown in the picture above, unfortunately).

This is where things get irritating. Your wires are all a little bit thicker than the ones you replaced. It’s tough to get them positioned in such a way that everything will fit back together nicely. Do your best – it is possible. Try not to bend the wires too many times (they might break), and remember to connect the two green ground wires to the back of the box! You may find you need to strip back some more outer insulation to get things to bend properly. I stripped it back as far as I could without going past the strain relief screws. I also covered all of the screw points with electrical tape to prevent accidental cross circuiting in close quarters. If you break a wire, it’s no big deal, just strip your insulation back a bit more to reveal fresh ends.

Get everything positioned in place, and screw the box shut. Make sure you have not accidentally reversed the on and off buttons when you assembled the inside – ON matches with START and OFF matches with STOP!

Note above, the OFF button is nearer to the end with the black cords coming out.

That was the hardest part! Congratulations. Treat yourself to a soda or ice water before continuing. :)

Next, we need to change the orientation of the four wires coming from the motor. These are labelled 1, 2, 3 and 4. Then you have three wires coming from your original 16 gauge cord – white, black, and green. Green is ground and is attached to the back of the wire box. When it’s wired as 110v, the 1 and 2 motor wires are connected to the black cord wire, and the 3 and 4 motor wires are connected to the white cord wire.

Start by removing the electrical tape and prying off the two orange caps. It’s better to pull them straight rather than twist them, though it does take a bit of force. I used a plastic bottle cap for some leverage. Once they are off, you can see that they were twisted together inside the caps.

Separate all of the wires, and unscrew the green ground wire from the back of the box. The 16 gauge cord is held in place by a plastic strain relief device. It’s really hard to get out, and you may need to borrow some muscle to do it. You need to squeeze the two sides of the top half together enough so they can fit down through the hole. I used needlenose pliers for this.

You’ll run into a slight problem here. The 14 gauge wire won’t fit through this 16 gauge strain relief, but all of the 14 gauge strain relief pieces at my hardware stores required a larger hole to put them in, and I can’t cut a larger hole in the metal of this box. I ended up using a dremel tool to sand/cut away enough plastic to make this piece work. Trimming the insulation helps too – just make sure you don’t trim too much. You don’t want individual wires visible from outside the box. This part will be the other “hardest part” of this project.

Once you’ve got the strain relief resized, you’re golden. Strip off about two or three inches of insulation on the cord and, as before, strip away a few millimeters on the top of each of the three wires. (You may want to take a look at how much cord length you have between the switch box and the motor box, and cut off any excess. It’s up to you, but don’t cut it too short! My three feet only gave a couple of spare inches in the end, easily tucked out of the way.) You’ll need to attach another ring terminal to the green wire.

Put your strain relief around your cord from the outside of the box. Insert the cord and the relief into the hole together, and push until it snaps into place. Be aware that it will be VERY difficult to get out again, so be sure you’re ready to do this!

Screw the green grounding wire into the back of the box. Take motor wires 2 and 3, twist them lightly together, then take the spare orange cap that was taped inside the wire box and put it on top of the wires. Twist the cap clockwise and the wires will slowly twist together and jam inside the cap.

Put some electrical tape on the outside. Then do the same with wire 1 and the black cord wire, and finally with wire 4 and the white cord wire. You should now have three sets of wires, all capped and taped. Double check your results against the wiring diagram inside the wire box.

That’s all of the wiring done! Now for cleanup – close up the motor box and cover the “110” label on the outside with electrical tape. Write “220” on it instead.

Connect your shorter length of cord (coming from the motor box) to that plastic wire guide that screws into the back of your bandsaw. Screw the ON/OFF switch box back to the saw’s side if you haven’t already. Don’t forget the grounding screw!

Congratulations, you’re done! Make sure your on/off switch is still off (in case you jostled it), then plug in your bandsaw, and carefully turn it on to test it. Happy sawing!



5 comments so far

View lew's profile

lew

10027 posts in 2407 days


#1 posted 07-31-2011 06:32 AM

Nice tutorial, Thanks!!

Don’t see any burns, punctures or cuts on your hands. You must have done everything right ;^)

Lew

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14742 posts in 2327 days


#2 posted 07-31-2011 09:17 AM

Congrats!! That wasn’t so hard was it ;-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4981 posts in 1494 days


#3 posted 07-31-2011 07:32 PM

Thanks for sharing the journey and realities of the journey.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Paul's profile

Paul

345 posts in 2241 days


#4 posted 08-01-2011 09:08 PM

I knew you could do it!

-- If you say 'It's good enough', it probably isn't.

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3657 posts in 1816 days


#5 posted 08-02-2011 02:56 AM

That a way to go. And now you have a new skill, as well.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase