LumberJocks

Extremely Average #229: Shattered Jig or I Need Your Help

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Blog entry by Ecocandle posted 08-21-2010 05:16 AM 4335 reads 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 228: Thanks to Tom and Ralph Part 229 of Extremely Average series Part 230: Valley of Mediocrity »

Hello All,

I had a brief disaster in the shop today, and as such, exploded my spline cutting jig. Sometimes that happens. On another not, my herd of boxes is nearly finished…I hope…though the finishing stages do seem to be dragging on…but I digress.

A couple of people have expressed interest in my tiny boxes. I had not planned on selling any of them, but now I think I might be willing to part with a few of them. Which presents a bit of a quandary, how much should I charge for a tiny box? To be honest, I am not entirely sure I want to part with any of them, but when I am done with the current batch of 12, and I have 14 boxes roaming around the house, looking all cute and everything, I might be willing to let a few go to new homes.

So if you wish to give your opinion, feel free to check out the boxes which are nearly done. And give your two cents worth. I should mention that all of the boxes will have splines which match the lid, but of course, I need to fix the jig with was spectacularly destroyed today.

http://su.pr/2jfLqM

Thanks,

Brian

-- Brian Meeks, http://extremelyaverage.com



10 comments so far

View Gregn's profile

Gregn

1642 posts in 1737 days


#1 posted 08-21-2010 06:12 AM

Not sure what to tell you. Although there was a pricing survey results here a short time ago you might get an idea how to come up with a price.
http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com/LumberJocksPricingSurvey.htm
This will help parting with them a little easier. LOL

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

View Ecocandle's profile

Ecocandle

1013 posts in 1819 days


#2 posted 08-21-2010 09:49 AM

I really just wanted people’s opinion. There isn’t a right or wrong answer.

That was an interesting study. Thanks for the link.

-- Brian Meeks, http://extremelyaverage.com

View Gregn's profile

Gregn

1642 posts in 1737 days


#3 posted 08-21-2010 01:28 PM

It wasn’t meant to be an answer but things to think about in pricing your work. I to would have a difficult time pricing my own work if I were to sell any of it myself. I guess being a woodworker you naturally think of price as something you can do cheaper, or like stuff in the store you think I can make it better. Its like you said its hard to part with something your attached to. If money isn’t the main objective you could have fun with it and have an mini auction with those interested and start at the lowest amount you feel comfortable with and see how much they would be willing to bid on them. You might be surprised at how much they think your boxes are worth.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

View BobG's profile

BobG

172 posts in 1715 days


#4 posted 08-21-2010 01:33 PM

That’s a tough question! If you sold them for enough to cover time and materials plus know how, you would have to charge at least $75.00 each. I think it would be hard to do unless you had an outlet in a very affluent area. During these times that is hard to come by.

-- BobG, Lowell, Arkansas--------My goal in life is to be the kind of person my dog thinks I am! Make more saw dust!!

View Bearpie's profile

Bearpie

2592 posts in 1771 days


#5 posted 08-21-2010 03:09 PM

To be perfectly frank, “Time” means nothing unless you are doing this for a living. “Materials” means nothing unless you are rich and can afford to give it away. “Profit” means nothing unless you are greedy. Now you have to juggle and find the happy medium with which you can work with. The values you set for yourself may not apply to me and the set values I apply to myself may be way more than you can afford or maybe not! It is one thing to sell to strangers and completely another to sell to family. You will give to family what you would not give to strangers. Really, no one can give you a set price to put on your projects, only suggestions of variables that may apply to each different situations. You may charge family one price for an object and strangers another. You may charge a price today that tomorrow you would double for the same thing. What it boils down to is, “What do you really want for this piece or what do you must have?”.

Erwin, Jacksonville, FL

-- Erwin, Jacksonville, FL

View Ecocandle's profile

Ecocandle

1013 posts in 1819 days


#6 posted 08-22-2010 05:00 AM

Bearpie,

Your question, “What do you really want for this piece?” is one I know the answer to. I didn’t want to mention that in the post, as I didn’t want to skew the results. Everyone’s response has been helpful. I was curious if the answers would be greater or less than the number I had in my mind.

As for your other points, I agree on ‘Time’ and ‘Materials’. That is very much how a TOC person thinks about pricing. If one is trying to run a business, they should focus on througput. :-)

Brian

-- Brian Meeks, http://extremelyaverage.com

View Ecocandle's profile

Ecocandle

1013 posts in 1819 days


#7 posted 08-22-2010 05:02 AM

Gregan,

I think you are right on the mark, about how woodworkers think about things when they see them. Or at the very least, that is how I think about it. I really do appreciate the link you sent, it was helpful.

Brian

-- Brian Meeks, http://extremelyaverage.com

View Ecocandle's profile

Ecocandle

1013 posts in 1819 days


#8 posted 08-22-2010 05:02 AM

Bob,

Thanks for giving an answer. All of the answers, both here and on my blog, have been incredibly helpful.

Brian

-- Brian Meeks, http://extremelyaverage.com

View Ecocandle's profile

Ecocandle

1013 posts in 1819 days


#9 posted 08-23-2010 09:12 AM

Jorge,

I am not offended in the least by your number. I am not making the tiny boxes, because I am hoping to create a product which I will sell. I am making them because I am hope to become better at woodworking. When I get done with them though, there are a few people who have expressed an interest in them. My query was to help me get an idea of their perceived value, which is exactly the answer you gave me. :-)

I completely agree with you about the comparison of photography to woodworking. I sell most of my photos for just a few dollars. I make almost nothing over the course of a year. But it is still a thrill when someone buys one.

Brian

-- Brian Meeks, http://extremelyaverage.com

View Ecocandle's profile

Ecocandle

1013 posts in 1819 days


#10 posted 08-23-2010 09:21 AM

JorgeG,

I liked your portfolio, especially the doorway shots. I have always been fascinated with doors and doorways, though I am not sure why. Perhaps it is the excitement over what might be behind the next door? I don’t know.

Brian

-- Brian Meeks, http://extremelyaverage.com

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