LumberJocks

Extremely Average #120: Really? 4 hours and I am not done yet.

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Ecocandle posted 1543 days ago 793 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 119: Progress on the Jig Part 120 of Extremely Average series Part 121: More sharpening today...and I love it. »

Hello LJ folks,

Today I bought some marble tiles, spray glue, wet dry sand paper and made sharpening slabs. I have seen many people suggest that this is a good precursor to the wet stone. So I started on the 180 grit. Now 4 hours later the back of the spokeshave blade is still not done, and I have swapped out the 180 for another piece. In the videos it always looks like they get it done rather quickly. Perhaps it is me.

So that is what I blogged about tonight. If you are curious to see what 4 hours of 180 grit will do to an antique spokeshave blade, feel free to check out the photos.

http://digg.com/d31Q0W9

ok, back to the blade. I will finish it eventually.

Brian

-- Brian Meeks, http://extremelyaverage.com



5 comments so far

View Tim Lawson's profile

Tim Lawson

17 posts in 1548 days


#1 posted 1543 days ago

Hi Brian,
When lapping the back of a blade or restoring a bevel you need to go to the coarsest grit that will get the job done. If there is stiill a low spot on the back of blade after a couple of minutes go coarser by one grit (150). If after a minute at 150 there is still a low spot go to 120. You may need to go as low as 80 grit to get if flat (you’ll have been really unlucky with the blade). Once you’ve got the coarest grit that flattens the back you can then back up the grits really quickly. Don’t forget to change angle at whcih you lap the blade between grits. When you’ve removed the 45 degree striae with a 90 degree rub you’re done at that grit.

This is a situation is when sticky back sandpaper is your friend. I use the Norton Champagne paper and it works well. It’s spendy (around $40 a roll) but a roll will last a long time. If you live near a marine chandlery (I do) you can buy it by the foot.

Rather than a tile I’d suggest looking for some 1/4 plate glass (not tempered) and get several pieces – 12”x6” and a 12”x12”. I’d use the first as a lapping plane and the second as a honing plate. Being able to stick down multiple grits at once can save a lot of time.

Good luck

Tim

-- Tim Lawson http://www.ptwoodschool.com http://www.timlawson.net

View Ecocandle's profile

Ecocandle

1013 posts in 1663 days


#2 posted 1543 days ago

What is the difference between a piece of 12” x 12” glass and 12” x 12” Marble? I am sorry I don’t understand.

-- Brian Meeks, http://extremelyaverage.com

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2419 days


#3 posted 1543 days ago

Brian, the marble will work just as well as the plate glass. Basically you just need a flat substrate to attach the sandpaper. Marble, granite, plate glass will all work just fine.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View Tim Lawson's profile

Tim Lawson

17 posts in 1548 days


#4 posted 1543 days ago

Tile to me is bathroom tile, Marble is good. Sorry for the confusion.

Tim

-- Tim Lawson http://www.ptwoodschool.com http://www.timlawson.net

View Ecocandle's profile

Ecocandle

1013 posts in 1663 days


#5 posted 1543 days ago

Cool, thanks. It had seemed to be working fine, but I am still new enough that I don’t take anything for granted.

-- Brian Meeks, http://extremelyaverage.com

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase