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The Super Sled #2: VIDEO - Mitering and Crosscut Sled

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Blog entry by John Nixon posted 1968 days ago 14562 reads 98 times favorited 21 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Shop Built Tenon Jig Part 2 of The Super Sled series Part 3: Mitering Fence »

To download a measured drawing or to see the full photo gallery, click here:
http://www.eaglelakewoodworking.com/post/Super-Sled-Crosscut-and-Miter-Sled.aspx

Project Description:

I just completed a two part video series on how I made my new table saw sled. I’ve named the new sled the “Super Sled”.

The Super Sled combines two of my best shop jigs!

I love my original crosscut sled, so when the voters at Eagle Lake asked me to make a video about how to make that sled, I started to think of ways to improve upon the existing design.

I regularly use two different sleds in my shop:
1. My crosscut sled which I use mainly for crosscutting, and cutting shoulder cuts on tenons.
2. Wood Magazines Universal Tablesaw Jig which I use exclusively for mitering.

While contemplating ways to improve on the design of my crosscut sled, I started to focus on the concept of combining the two sleds. I spent a lot of time modeling the new Super Sled in Google Sketchup and I feel I have come up with one of the most versatile crosscut / mitering sleds around. When you see the video for the construction of the sled, I think you’ll be surprised at how easy it is to build for yourself!

Features:

Crosscutting
The Super Sled has all the benefits of my original crosscut sled, including a t-track for adjustable stop blocks. The new sled uses a flip stop, so you can keep the stop in the same place, but flip it up out of the way to make other cuts in between.

With generous capacity to the left and right of the saw blade, the Super Sled can handle just about any crosscut. The main fence is extended out farther on the left side of the blade allowing you to use the flip stop for long cuts.
Super Sled

Mitering

I really love mitering with Wood Magazines Universal Tablesaw jig which is why I wanted to incorporate all the features of this jig into the Super Sled. The Universal Tablesaw jig needs to be switched from one side of the blade to the other when doing complementary miters. With an identical setup on both sides of the blade, you can easily miter on either side of the blade.

The fence used for mitering has a t-track for mounting a stop block or hold downs and can be positioned any where from 0 to about 70 degrees.
Super Sled

Versatility

I designed the Super Sled with versatility in mind. The four slots in the main board of the fence function the same as t-tracks, and allow for the inclusion of stop blocks, the miter fence, and other add-on jigs like a tenon or box joint jig.

The main board for the super sled is 1/2 inch plywood. I went with 1/2 inch plywood so I wouldn’t loose very much blade height capacity. The four slots in the main board are 3/8 inch wide from the top, and have a 3/4 inch wide shallow recess in the bottom and will accomodate a standard 5/16 inch t-bolt.
Super Sled

Pictures:
Super Sled

Smiley dude:
Super Sled

Setup for crosscutting
Super Sled

Setup for Mitering
Super Sled

Angling tenon jig:
Super Sled

-- John Nixon - Buffalo, NY - http://www.EagleLakeWoodworking.com



21 comments so far

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14604 posts in 2277 days


#1 posted 1968 days ago

Thanks. I need to build one of these ;~)

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View davidroberts's profile

davidroberts

1002 posts in 2087 days


#2 posted 1968 days ago

John, I just wanted to say I really like your work and your videos. I especially like that you get right down to business in the videos. They are full of helpful tips and are nicely produced. It seems some of the video’ers like to talk for 9 minutes then make a cut the last minute. I’ve even seen some that are just all talk. I appreciate that you stay focused and try to show as much actual work as possible. Keep up the good work!

-- God is great, wood is good. Let us thank Him for wood......and old hand tools.

View David's profile

David

1970 posts in 2740 days


#3 posted 1968 days ago

John -

Another outstanding presentation from Eagle Lake Woodworking! I alway enjoy your attention to detail. I especially like your tips and workflow in the shop. After watching both videos I believe my shop will be seeing another crosscut sled in the future! I’m a huge fan. Thanks for sharing!

David

-- http://foldingrule.blogspot.com

View John Nixon's profile

John Nixon

189 posts in 2664 days


#4 posted 1967 days ago

Thanks Guys! I appreciate you checking out the video and commenting here.

I wanted to show an easy method for two of the things that most people seem to question when building a crosscut sled:
1.) How to get the runners on there and operating smoothly.
2.) How to square the fence to the blade.

There will be a another video in this series about how to build the accessories and use the sled.

David Roberts – I know what you mean about showing the woodworking action. I try to focus on showing as much closeup woodworking action as possible.

-- John Nixon - Buffalo, NY - http://www.EagleLakeWoodworking.com

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

19319 posts in 2452 days


#5 posted 1967 days ago

Great blog John. Very professional explanation.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14604 posts in 2277 days


#6 posted 1967 days ago

John, I have watched your video a couple of times. The only question I have is how to best square up the back fence if you don’t have a planer and joiner?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View John Nixon's profile

John Nixon

189 posts in 2664 days


#7 posted 1967 days ago

TopamaxSurvivor – without a jointer and planer, I would probably make a torsion box fence. Are you familiar with constructing torsion boxes? Essentially, it’s a grid that skinned on both sides with sheet material (plywood, hardboard, or mdf).

The option would be a lamination of two pieces of 3/4 plywood. If you have some decent plywood that’s flat, this would provide a suitable fence because plywood has a consistant thickness.

Do either of these sound good to you?

-- John Nixon - Buffalo, NY - http://www.EagleLakeWoodworking.com

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14604 posts in 2277 days


#8 posted 1967 days ago

Thanks John, I’m not familiar with a torsion box fence. Going with the plywood option sounds easy enough.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14604 posts in 2277 days


#9 posted 1967 days ago

John, another question, if you don’t mind. What are the runners made of and where do you find those plastic strips? BTW, Fantastic website you have ;-)

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View John Nixon's profile

John Nixon

189 posts in 2664 days


#10 posted 1967 days ago

TopamaxSurvivor -

I’m glad you like my site…thanks.

I’ve been meaning to put a parts source for this project at my site that will show where to get the things I had to buy.

The runners are UHMV plastic and are available from PeachTree and other places:
http://www.ptreeusa.com/uhmw_list.htm

The 48 inch strip is what I used and cut it into 26 and 22 inch runners.

John

-- John Nixon - Buffalo, NY - http://www.EagleLakeWoodworking.com

View cabinetmaster's profile

cabinetmaster

10874 posts in 2159 days


#11 posted 1967 days ago

The best home made sled I’ve seen. I need to build me one after I get a new tablesaw….....LOL

-- Jerry--A man can never have enough tools or clamps

#12 posted 1966 days ago

I use sleds to make almost EVERY cross cut I make on the tablesaw. Congratulations on a well designed sled!

By the way, I noticed you used a ShopSmith in the drillpress mode. I’ve had a SS for about 27 years. It was my first serious woodworking tool. In my opinion (you know what they say about opinions!) the SS is hard to beat as a drillpress. I don’t have another drillpress and I don’t intend to. The SS has good quill length for deep holes and great speed control in a stepless range.

Thanks for the first video. Looking forward to the second.
d

-- Will trade wife's yarn for tools.

View John Nixon's profile

John Nixon

189 posts in 2664 days


#13 posted 1966 days ago

Thanks Jerry!

Thanks donbee.
RE: Shopsmith – you nailed it, it’s a great drill press. In fact, I took mine off it’s stand and made a small-footprint dedicated stand so that I have it in drill press mode all the time. The Shopsmith I have is a 1951 10ER that belonged to my grandfather. I cherish that machine for it’s sentimental value and I’ll keep it forever. It still runs almost like new with the original motor and bearings, although I bet I am about due to change the quill bearings.

The second video is actually accessible from that same viewer up above, it’s just sort of cut off. Check out the upper right hand side of the player, you can see part of the thumbnail for part 2.

Thanks for watching and commenting here, I appreciate it
John

-- John Nixon - Buffalo, NY - http://www.EagleLakeWoodworking.com

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13337 posts in 2274 days


#14 posted 1959 days ago

Nice video! I use a crosscut sled all the time on my table saw.

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View Mike's profile

Mike

247 posts in 1984 days


#15 posted 1766 days ago

Really nice, I like the sled idea. Thanks for the video.

-- Mike, VT

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