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Video Journey - Oak Dovetailed Blanket Chest

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Blog entry by John Nixon posted 2364 days ago 2373 reads 3 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I recently finished a dovetailed blanket chest as a wedding gift for my good friend. I think it came out pretty nice.

I was able to get it into his house while he was away on his honeymoon. He and his new bride really loved it! It’s a great feeling knowing that they will have this gift and cherish it forever.

I made a video about the entire process.
Here’s a link to the video. Check it out, and leave a comment telling me what you think:
http://www.eaglelakewoodworking.com/post/Oak-Blanket-Chest.aspx

Oak Blanket Chest

Oak Blanket Chest 2

Oak Blanket Chest 3

Thanks for loookin!
John Nixon
www.EagleLakeWoodworking.com

-- John Nixon - Buffalo, NY - http://www.EagleLakeWoodworking.com



13 comments so far

View Karson's profile

Karson

34797 posts in 2902 days


#1 posted 2364 days ago

Great looking chest John. A very nice surprise.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2538 days


#2 posted 2364 days ago

Nice chest, John. I’m sure it was a great surprise!

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Brad_Nailor's profile

Brad_Nailor

2527 posts in 2459 days


#3 posted 2364 days ago

Wow..that is very nice. Quality joinery…simple and elegant. That is an heirloom piece for sure!

-- http://www.facebook.com/pages/DSO-Designs/297237806954248

View David's profile

David

1970 posts in 2640 days


#4 posted 2364 days ago

John -

Awesome chest! I always enjoy your posts and video links.

David

-- http://foldingrule.blogspot.com

View John Nixon's profile

John Nixon

189 posts in 2565 days


#5 posted 2363 days ago

Thank you kindly friends – I appreciate your compliments and feedback!

-- John Nixon - Buffalo, NY - http://www.EagleLakeWoodworking.com

View Mark Mazzo's profile

Mark Mazzo

352 posts in 2414 days


#6 posted 2362 days ago

John,

Great video! Both the woodworking and production were excellent. I’m sure that your friend will be very happy with the result.

By the way, we are neighbors…I live in Webster, NY – suburb of Rochester!

-- Mark, Webster New York, Visit my website at http://thecraftsmanspath.com

View Chip's profile

Chip

1904 posts in 2594 days


#7 posted 2362 days ago

Beautiful work, great video. Thanks John.

-- Better to say nothing and be thought the fool... then to speak and erase all doubt!

View furnitologist's profile

furnitologist

198 posts in 2515 days


#8 posted 2362 days ago

Hi John:

That’s an excellent video.

I liked the double bearing on the straight pattern bit, good idea…..better than a LumberJock climb cut.

QUESTION: You had a tough choice when deciding on the machining operation for the full mortice for the lock. I see the dilemna of the amount of exposed bit. What was your thought process in using your motorized router??? What other approach were you thinking there if any.

Nicely done, John….....Neil

View John Nixon's profile

John Nixon

189 posts in 2565 days


#9 posted 2362 days ago

Thanks Neil. I appreciate your compliments – it means a lot coming from you.

The stock for the front of the blanket chest is 3/4 inch thick and the mortise for the lockset needed to be a heavy 1/2” wide and just under 2 inches deep. That leaves less than an 1/8” wall remaining after I’m done cutting the mortise. Believe me, I thought about this one long and hard.
Here’s some of the methods I considered
1.) Get out the chisel and chop it out by hand.
2.) Build a simple jig that would guide my plunge router handheld.
3.) Use a Forstner bit in the drill press. I have an old Shopsmith, and I think I have the clearance could get the carcass underneath the bit.
4.) Mortise it on the router table employing the motorized lift.

Here’s why I didn’t go with #1 – 3:
1.) I’m not really keen on chiseling mortises. Some of my apprehension is my chisels and the rest is my lack of experience in this technique. I also find it time consuming (probably because I’m not that good at it).
2.) I didn’t like the idea of that much bit sticking out of my handheld router. I also didn’t like the idea of building a jig.
3.) The material remaining in the wall of the chest was too thin to risk doing it with a Forstner bit because sometimes they wander.

I went with #4 because I have successfully done deep mortises with this method before. This situation was unique in the fact that the piece was rather large. The concept was the same – to know the boundaries of the mortise and move the piece within those boundaries while advancing the bit upwards. I did this by marking the center of the mortise on the blanket chest and positioning the chest on the router table aligned with the center of the bit. Then I marked that piece of masking tape you see in the video with the left and right boundaries of the mortise. After that, I just need to keep the chest against the fence and move it left to right within the lines on the masking tape.

I am open to alternative suggestions and techniques for this. I was at my limit with the size of this piece, where I wouldn’t want to use this method if the piece was any larger.

-- John Nixon - Buffalo, NY - http://www.EagleLakeWoodworking.com

View John Nixon's profile

John Nixon

189 posts in 2565 days


#10 posted 2362 days ago

Thanks Chip and Mark for your kind words.
Mark, very cool that we’re in the same general area. I stopped by your site and read your review on Kelly Mehler’s lecture from your woodworking club. Very nice indeed. I wish I was a little closer and less busy, I’d join the club.

While I was at your site http://thecraftsmanspath.com, I took at a look at your work and I was excited and impressed. You have done some great work in the Arts and Crafts style. Your finish looks awesome (I love the tone). Your latest table with the Asian influence is a great design.

Thanks again for commenting on the video.

John

-- John Nixon - Buffalo, NY - http://www.EagleLakeWoodworking.com

View Mark Mazzo's profile

Mark Mazzo

352 posts in 2414 days


#11 posted 2362 days ago

John,

I noticed this in the video as well. Though your router lift works well, it did look awkward moving that large chest over the bit.

I would have probably marked out the mortise location and roughed it out with a hand drill with a slightly undersized drill bit. Then I would have cleaned up the mortise with a chisel. I think that even with modrtate chiseling skills this would be very doable. I can see where with the 1/8” walls chopping out the mortise could have caused problems when levering out the waste.

-- Mark, Webster New York, Visit my website at http://thecraftsmanspath.com

View furnitologist's profile

furnitologist

198 posts in 2515 days


#12 posted 2361 days ago

Hi John:

Excellent answer for us all. That was a tough call…I was thinking hand-held router, but hedged on the exposed bit, drilling and chiseling….oh that wall is thin…...Then I thought rout before assembly, but the width of the board means another re-worked fence for just one piece…............you know your tools; nice call you made.

I enjoy watching you work….....Neil

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2663 days


#13 posted 2361 days ago

Nice chest John. I liked the video too. Great job.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

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