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(Workbench) Chevalet #7: A cautious start

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Blog entry by Dutchy posted 12-01-2015 09:15 PM 863 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 6: Saw blades Part 7 of (Workbench) Chevalet series no next part

I started with making a intarisa raccoon and tried some different saw blades.

The first blade I tried was the most expensive.

As you can see this blades are called maketerie, the dutch word for marqueterie. The blades are very coarse. And it is hard to make curves with it.
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The second blade I tried is the second most expensive.

It is very easy to make curves with this blades, almost to easy but the saw cut is very rough.
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The cheapest I used I liked the most.

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Below a few more pictures:
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I probably saw the sharp corners still in the wrong way and have to do more practice. Do you think I can use saw blades skip 3 or maybe 2 for 8-10mm thick wood?

Thanks for watching and…..................you can make me happy with all sorts of comments.

-- My englisch is bad but how is your dutch?



7 comments so far

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

7703 posts in 2306 days


#1 posted 12-01-2015 09:49 PM

Great start! I’d definitely need a magnifier. LOL!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2797 days


#2 posted 12-01-2015 10:31 PM

It looks like you are making good progress Jan. A ‘bad’ cut on an artistic line is no problem except that the piece that is glued to it has to match that area where you strayed from the line. You can just alter the line on the next piece using the ‘bad’ on as a template. I hope some of that makes sense.

The ‘button has only one purpose. That is to hold it against your shoulder to steady the frame while changing blades or for refastening the blade after inserting it through a hole.

How do you like cutting with your new marquetry saw?

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2015 posts in 1632 days


#3 posted 12-01-2015 10:42 PM

Thanks Thomas and Mike.

I’m not yet enthusiastic Mike, but it is still too early to really judge/deem.

-- My englisch is bad but how is your dutch?

View kiefer's profile

kiefer

4881 posts in 2130 days


#4 posted 12-02-2015 02:07 AM

Just remind yourself that practise makes perfect .
Interesting never the less to watch you .

Klaus

-- Kiefer https://www.youtube.com/user/woodkiefer1/videos

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7168 posts in 2261 days


#5 posted 12-02-2015 03:11 AM

Good start Jan. You are breaking new ground here. The saw was meant for veneer but you seem to be doing very well with thicker stock. Just shows how clever those parisien ebenistes were way back when they came up with these things. Line following is a matter of practice. You will get better. :-)

BTW I recognize that chevalet.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2015 posts in 1632 days


#6 posted 12-02-2015 07:59 AM

Thanks Klaus and Paul.

Paul Sawing thicker pieces isn’t a problem. Even 3/4” is possible. However clamping is a issue. There has to be always wood between the clamps. This is what Mike wrote in a PM:

The only way you could use a chevalet is for workpieces to be big enough to hold in your one hand as you turn it in the clamp while working the saw with your other hand.

This means that you will have to cut each individual piece from a larger piece. The cuts will have to be internal cuts as you must preserve the outer edges of the workpiece so you can still hold onto it and at the same time turn it in the clamp. Also, the workpiece must remain flat in order for it to turn smoothly in the clamp.

A possible disadvantage would be when you are using different wood species for different parts and you still need large enough workpieces (for the reasons given above) to cut out small parts.

And indeed this is making the chevalet less appropriate for intarsia or other jigsaw work than for example a jigsaw. However a good working jigsaw is expencive and the few work I will do on it doesn’t warrants the purchase of a good jigsaw machine. And in the future there is always the possibility to try marqueterie.

BTW It’s your chevalet. I knew that it was yours when I saw the bearings. (The bearings on mine are also fine! They are gliding very smooth and very easy).

I do not know how to pronounce chevalet in English, but when you do it the French way the rhyme is top-notch with BTW.

-- My englisch is bad but how is your dutch?

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7168 posts in 2261 days


#7 posted 12-02-2015 05:36 PM

I’m Canadian Jan. I pronounce French words in French, so if you mean “by the way, chevalet”, yes it does make a nice rhyme. :-)

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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