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Wooden toys wheel making #6: Rims part 2

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Blog entry by Dutchy posted 09-19-2015 07:46 PM 15499 reads 3 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 5: Rims part 1 Part 6 of Wooden toys wheel making series no next part

Below pictures of making the “circle” parts for the rims. Also pictures from how the nuts are made.

Thanks for watching

-- My englisch is bad but how is your dutch?



17 comments so far

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7472 posts in 1466 days


#1 posted 09-19-2015 08:06 PM

Geeze Dutchy … is there anything you CANT do???

Looks like real wheel/tires !

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2008 posts in 1628 days


#2 posted 09-19-2015 08:41 PM

Yes Joe a lot !!

Write in good english for example.

-- My englisch is bad but how is your dutch?

View Northwest29's profile

Northwest29

1494 posts in 1950 days


#3 posted 09-20-2015 12:00 PM

Really looking good. I’m amazed at how labor intensive this project is and wow, that’s an awful lot of holes and toothpicks. You are a very patient fellow.

-- Ron, Eugene, OR, "Curiosity is a terrible thing to waste."

View kiefer's profile

kiefer

4881 posts in 2126 days


#4 posted 09-20-2015 05:18 PM

That is turning out real nice .
Two questions
Why are you not using your sanding jig to shape the parts ?
What do you use for ebonizing the tires .

Klaus

-- Kiefer https://www.youtube.com/user/woodkiefer1/videos

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2794 days


#5 posted 09-20-2015 05:20 PM

You and I know that patience has nothing to do with Jan. It’s all about the fun of doing the work and getting a good result. I love modeling. I haven’t done much of it for a long time. Watching you make these masterpiece trucks, etc. makes me want to get into it again, but I am trying to resist the temptation so I can get better at other things I have recently learned. I should have started woodworking at an earlier age.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View George_SA's profile

George_SA

298 posts in 1673 days


#6 posted 09-20-2015 05:26 PM

This very good. Thanks for sharing.

-- There are some things that money can't buy - Manners, morals and integrity

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23113 posts in 2326 days


#7 posted 09-20-2015 06:08 PM

Dutchy, this is top notch work. They look so realistic.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2008 posts in 1628 days


#8 posted 09-20-2015 06:11 PM

Thank you guys.

Kiefer:
You have brought me an idea. To sand with the jig I only have to drill a hole in the circles. Only the “top” circle can’t be drilled but for the others it isn’t a problem. So: Thanks

The tires are ebonized with only a mix of steel wool and vinegar (two times). I would prefer beech for the wheels but the reason I don’t use it is that it has less ley in it than european oak.

Mike:
It’s up you to get into it again or trying to resist the temptation. But when you like I send you the drawings of the WWII Jeep. And I’m sure you can make it !!!!. You have already the tools you need. Bandsaw, jig saw (or Cevalet), drum sander. I don,t know you have a disksander.

-- My englisch is bad but how is your dutch?

View jim65's profile

jim65

805 posts in 1393 days


#9 posted 09-20-2015 07:36 PM

excellent. details and your patience is always amazing!

-- Jim, Marostica Italy

View Julian's profile

Julian

1033 posts in 2150 days


#10 posted 09-20-2015 11:55 PM

The wheels look great. Amazing detail. Great job.

-- Julian

View crowie's profile

crowie

1477 posts in 1410 days


#11 posted 09-23-2015 02:23 AM

The patience of a saint and the skills of a mater craftsman, have combined very well to produce a near prefect wheel, tyre & rim assembly….

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

View Roger's profile

Roger

19855 posts in 2264 days


#12 posted 09-24-2015 02:56 AM

WowZa! That is some super finely detailed building

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

580 posts in 280 days


#13 posted 02-26-2016 12:29 PM



Thank you guys.

Kiefer:
You have brought me an idea. To sand with the jig I only have to drill a hole in the circles. Only the “top” circle can t be drilled but for the others it isn t a problem. So: Thanks

I am impressed on your freehand sanding, however, for and depending on the diameter of the “top” circle, you could turn a dowel (if not available) and cut slices using a Japanese saw or similar. If you have one you’ll know what I mean and if you haven’t, you can cut wafer thin slices and the finish off the tool is practically sanded quality (just a light sand on perimeters may be required for perfection). Alex.

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2008 posts in 1628 days


#14 posted 02-26-2016 12:54 PM

That,s possible Alex. But with dowels you would see the endgrain. And for me it is easy to make thin wood on my drumsander.

-- My englisch is bad but how is your dutch?

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

580 posts in 280 days


#15 posted 02-26-2016 01:27 PM

You could laminate 1” squares on long grain and rout or turn against grain with a very sharp chisel. I like the way you do it, however, I’m guessing my disc sanding is not too good and I have lost many layers of skin sanding small pieces (even with a jig) yet you do it without. Furthermore they are small.

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD

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