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Fordson super dexta wooden model #30: Seat, chapter 22

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Blog entry by Dutchy posted 07-31-2017 09:09 PM 1626 reads 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 29: Dash, chapter 21 Part 30 of Fordson super dexta wooden model series Part 31: PTO, chapter 23 »

Pictures below are from the making of the seat of the Fordson Dexta.

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Thanks for watching

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/



11 comments so far

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

1274 posts in 636 days


#1 posted 07-31-2017 09:41 PM

WoW! Even if I say that backwards, it’s still just as good…

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View crowie's profile

crowie

1991 posts in 1766 days


#2 posted 07-31-2017 09:51 PM

Dutchy, to say you do a good tutorial is an understatement, thank you for the photos & notes…

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

View bj383ss's profile

bj383ss

187 posts in 2177 days


#3 posted 08-01-2017 10:44 AM

Fantastic Dutchy. I did some wood bending similar to your seat for the front spring of my 32’ Ford. I was not able to get near as much bend though. Care to share any secrets such as how long do you boil it? One thing I notice is your wood strips are thinner than what I tried to use. Possibly the timber is a species that likes to be bent.

Bret

-- https://www.flickr.com/photos/27291602@N03/

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2518 posts in 1984 days


#4 posted 08-03-2017 06:49 AM



Fantastic Dutchy. I did some wood bending similar to your seat for the front spring of my 32 Ford. I was not able to get near as much bend though. Care to share any secrets such as how long do you boil it? One thing I notice is your wood strips are thinner than what I tried to use. Possibly the timber is a species that likes to be bent.

Bret

- bj383ss

When the water boiled the power was reduced and for 5 minutes the wood was in hot water (about 90 degree C ) The wood is ash and the strips where about 0.7 mm thick.

Maybe you like this article

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

1274 posts in 636 days


#5 posted 08-03-2017 10:32 AM



The wood is ash and the strips where about 0.7 mm thick.

- Dutchy


That is thin. How did you cut it… other than carefully?

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2518 posts in 1984 days


#6 posted 08-03-2017 11:17 AM


The wood is ash and the strips where about 0.7 mm thick.

- Dutchy

That is thin. How did you cut it… other than carefully?

- LittleBlackDuck

Started with about 2 a 3 mm thin. Than sanded it back to 0.7 on the drumsander. To do this I used a piece of plywood. With some carpet tape I sticked the ash to the plywood and pushed the plywood with the ash true the sander till I got a 0.7 mm thin ash.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View bj383ss's profile

bj383ss

187 posts in 2177 days


#7 posted 08-03-2017 12:53 PM

Thanks for the link Dutchy. I was surprised to see Pecan on their list for bending wood. That stuff is the hardest hardwood I have encountered. After a project all of your blades are dull from it. I built my father in laws built in study out of it and he in turn bought me a new tablesaw and lots of blades and bits. I will have to give it at try.

The wood I was attempting to bend was Hard Maple and it is at the very bottom of the list. That is my luck. HA

Bret

-- https://www.flickr.com/photos/27291602@N03/

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

1274 posts in 636 days


#8 posted 08-03-2017 01:01 PM



..... some carpet tape I sticked the ash to the plywood…..

- Dutchy


OK, I’ll accept that double Dutch explanation, but….. how did you get the veneer from the carpet tape? I will accept “with difficulty without breaking”.... maybe.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2518 posts in 1984 days


#9 posted 08-03-2017 03:33 PM

OK, I ll accept that double Dutch explanation, but….. how did you get the veneer from the carpet tape? I will accept “with difficulty without breaking”.... maybe.

- LittleBlackDuck

I have to be honest. I use a double sided tape with is less strong than carpet tape. I call it carpet tape because than most people know what I mean. And a lot of people don’t often know what I mean, simply because I don’t write it the way others will understand it. To avoid breaking the wood I use a stanley knife which is pushed between the plywood and the ash.

When I would do it with real carpet tape I would use small spots on different places.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

1274 posts in 636 days


#10 posted 08-04-2017 02:34 AM

Dutchy, sorry to be the devil’s advocate but I have another question.

While I do have a drum sander, I’m guessing there a many woodworkers without one. Is there a major reason why you used this bending method rather than scrolling it? Is it just a case of the grain in the bend being too fragile and is subjected to easy breakage?

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2518 posts in 1984 days


#11 posted 08-04-2017 06:16 AM

I’m always glad with questions! Even from an advocate.

Ducky if I didn’t have a drum sander I would have sanded this thin strips on a sanding drum on my drillpress. The way #4 does it.

And some woodworkers has the possibility to buy veneer.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

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