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Fordson super dexta wooden model #25: Rear wheels, Chapter 17, part 3, Tyre and rim "marriage"

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Blog entry by Dutchy posted 07-24-2017 07:31 PM 6354 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 24: Rear wheels, Chapter 17, part 2, rims Part 25 of Fordson super dexta wooden model series Part 26: Rear axle, chapter 18. »

Pictures below are from the “marriage” of the rear tyres and rims of the Fordson Dexta.

Thanks for watching.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/



14 comments so far

View sras's profile

sras

4685 posts in 3000 days


#1 posted 07-24-2017 11:36 PM

A very good blog series – I’m enjoying every post!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View htl's profile (online now)

htl

3467 posts in 1030 days


#2 posted 07-25-2017 12:54 AM

Just so beautiful !!!!!!!!!
Love them there wheels so much!

-- Learn More About Making Wooden Models. An Index Of My Model making Blogs. http://lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/116729

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

1530 posts in 692 days


#3 posted 07-25-2017 11:57 AM

Awesome Dutchy!

However, this may be a dumb question, but why the dowels when they cannot be seen?

Try as I might, I just can’t get my ”ebony” as black as yours with an extra coating of tannin… maybe it’s the timber I’m using?

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View htl's profile (online now)

htl

3467 posts in 1030 days


#4 posted 07-25-2017 02:00 PM

Ducky could it be down under it turns white instead of black?
Just trying to keep track how things work down there.

I’m just thinking the dowels would mean less need for the glue that can put the ugly to one super nice and much worked on wheel.

-- Learn More About Making Wooden Models. An Index Of My Model making Blogs. http://lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/116729

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

1530 posts in 692 days


#5 posted 07-25-2017 02:34 PM


I’m just thinking the dowels would mean less need for the glue that can put the ugly to one super nice and much worked on wheel.

- htl


That makes sense to even me… I can live with that…

...Just trying to keep track how things….

- htl


You keep talking about it.

Sorry Dutchy, I’m polluting an innocent blog again with my one track obsession.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2683 posts in 2039 days


#6 posted 07-25-2017 03:13 PM


Awesome Dutchy!

However, this may be a dumb question, but why the dowels when they cannot be seen?

Try as I might, I just can t get my ”ebony” as black as yours with an extra coating of tannin… maybe it s the timber I m using?

- LittleBlackDuck

The dowels are for reinforcement of holding the inner rim in position. You can see it as a tenon and hole construction.

About the “Ebony” It took some time before I did this ebonizing thing the way it worked for me. This are my “rules”.

I use household viniegar,
And some steel wool super fine.
Put it in a jar.
Don’t close the jar.
Let it stay outside for more than at least 6 weeks.
Than I filter it with a nylon stocking
Ready for use.

I only use it on european oak (Quercus robur), a wood with a lot of tannin.
The vinegar and the stocking are from my wife, the wood from me.

Tomorrow I will try it on Cherry and make a picture from it.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View htl's profile (online now)

htl

3467 posts in 1030 days


#7 posted 07-25-2017 09:31 PM

Walnut and cherry seem to turn out the best for me but do love the way the oak isn’t as dark but shows it’s grain, but of course my woods are a little different than what you get Dutchy and what little ducks come wadding in with who can tell.
O I will also mention the I like the way the cherry cuts doesn’t seem to splinter as bad.

-- Learn More About Making Wooden Models. An Index Of My Model making Blogs. http://lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/116729

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

1530 posts in 692 days


#8 posted 07-26-2017 01:28 AM



..... the stocking are from my wife, .....

- Dutchy


Glad you added that!

I will admit, I use maple as our oak (Tasmanian oak.. though I believe a lot sell eucalyptus as oak) is a dog to wotk with. I found that maple does not ebonise too well, however, after adding tannin I am getting better results. Not perfect but better. Maybe that may be a blessing as my next project is the half-track and I am thinking of ebonising the whole truck (with light maple (“raw”) tyres for contrast).

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

11473 posts in 2738 days


#9 posted 07-26-2017 06:27 PM

Wow, that was some awesome journey thru all three wheels making blogs.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2683 posts in 2039 days


#10 posted 07-26-2017 08:07 PM



Awesome Dutchy!

Try as I might, I just can t get my ”ebony” as black as yours with an extra coating of tannin… maybe it s the timber I m using?

- LittleBlackDuck

Pictures below from ebonizing Oak, Cherry and Maple. All without a tannin coat.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View htl's profile (online now)

htl

3467 posts in 1030 days


#11 posted 07-26-2017 10:31 PM

I had been wondering what maple would look like but I should have know cause the store bought wheels are maple I think.
The maple not only doesn’t get dark but looks like it gets blotchy or doesn’t go no evenly.
I guess it would work for a cheap brown stain but needs something to help stop the blotchys.
Thanks for the test.

-- Learn More About Making Wooden Models. An Index Of My Model making Blogs. http://lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/116729

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

1530 posts in 692 days


#12 posted 07-27-2017 03:40 AM



I had been wondering what maple would look like …

- htl


Thanks for the time and effort Dutchy for the display and feedback.

Unfortunately, here in downtown Churchill we have about 1/10 the number timber merchants than Interstellar Space Stations. I go to Melbourne to buy my timber and the main “quality” timber I buy is maple (and walnut for contrast). That’s why all my models are maple.

As #4 attested and you have observed/demonstrated, maple does not take ebonizing too well on it’s own. Our local oak ebonises well but it’s far too grainy to use for fine intricate parts.

Back to working with maple. Black tea helps a tad but I’ve found (after much UGH! reading) that tannin powder dissolved in some water works a treat.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

1530 posts in 692 days


#13 posted 07-27-2017 03:58 AM



I had been wondering what maple would look like but I should have know cause the store bought wheels are maple I think.

- htl


100% correct #4 in your summation (and if you learn how to build tracks you would have been 110% correct). That is why I painted my “Logger” wheels. Ebonizing just crapped out. However, I did find that tung oil and black stain gave a neat “bronzish” hue on those pre-fabbed wheels.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View crowie's profile

crowie

2170 posts in 1822 days


#14 posted 07-31-2017 10:02 PM

Such beautiful realistic wheels & tyres….

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

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