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Fordson super dexta wooden model #23: Rear wheels, Chapter 17, part 1, tyres.

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Blog entry by Dutchy posted 06-17-2017 05:06 PM 5356 reads 0 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 22: Front wheels, Chapter 16 Part 23 of Fordson super dexta wooden model series no next part

Pictures below are from the making process of the rear wheel tyres of the Fordson Dexta.

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Thanks for watching.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/



15 comments so far

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

26385 posts in 2532 days


#1 posted 06-17-2017 05:41 PM

You did a nice job on these wheels and thanks for posting all of these pictures.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View htl's profile

htl

2652 posts in 825 days


#2 posted 06-17-2017 08:59 PM

Super nice work!!!
These wheels are what could get me to build a tractor.
Wheels!!! Wheels!!! Wheels!!! Wheels!!!

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View bushmaster's profile

bushmaster

2061 posts in 1948 days


#3 posted 06-17-2017 09:32 PM

Great idea on making the tires, by adding the raised tread, will try that, never thought of doing that.

-- Brian - Hazelton, British Columbia

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

909 posts in 486 days


#4 posted 06-18-2017 02:10 AM

Thanks for the plug, Dutchy,

A bank cheque for 10 guilders will be in the mail… soon.

Now this is a brilliant tip… at least for an idiot like me,

In the past I would make a 15mm board big enough to make it’s use safe and find that the waste was just sawdust fodder as I may never use it again. This way I could use my standard 19mm (or 16mm if I had some) with just sanding and no waste… It may be obvious to most, but far to often my brain just decides to hibernate.

Is there a special reason for the guide?

In the past I have always just depended on the bearing for rounding over.
If there is a special reason (for all wheels), would a generic guide like this be usable for all sized wheels?

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD

View Pjonesy's profile

Pjonesy

170 posts in 492 days


#5 posted 06-18-2017 07:25 AM

Well done Dutchy. Can I offer you a hint as you don’t have a 4mm saw blade. You can put 2 saw blades together sometimes or you can put small shims between the saw blade and the backing washer to create a wobble in the the blade I prefer the latter method as it makes a very neat cut.
Keep up the good work.

-- Peter New Zealand

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2272 posts in 1834 days


#6 posted 06-18-2017 08:50 AM


Is there a special reason for the guide?

In the past I have always just depended on the bearing for rounding over.
If there is a special reason (for all wheels), would a generic guide like this be usable for all sized wheels?

- LittleBlackDuck

Yes there is a special reason for the guide. Normally you can depend on the bearing, and I would have done that. But because the grooves the bearing would not follow a nice round contour. So the reason for this guide is to have a 100% round contour profile.

If there is a special reason (for all wheels), would a generic guide like this be usable for all sized wheels?

- LittleBlackDuck

Now this is a brilliant tip… at least for an idiot like me. Sometimes my brain need a reset. Your solutions is much better, and it is stupid that I never have thought in this direction. Thanks! But one last question. Is it possible to use that guide for round wheels or is it only for square wheels?

Thanks for the plug,Dutchy,

- LittleBlackDuck

Your welcome, and I’m glad that nowedays there is bitcoin.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2272 posts in 1834 days


#7 posted 06-18-2017 08:58 AM



Well done Dutchy. Can I offer you a hint as you don t have a 4mm saw blade. You can put 2 saw blades together sometimes or you can put small shims between the saw blade and the backing washer to create a wobble in the the blade I prefer the latter method as it makes a very neat cut.
Keep up the good work.

- Pjonesy

Thanks for the TIP Peter. For using two blades the 4 mm is to small. I am not a proponent of woble sawblades. Only two teeth would do the outside cutting of the grooves and fine tuning is hard to do.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2272 posts in 1834 days


#8 posted 06-18-2017 09:00 AM



Great idea on making the tires, by adding the raised tread, will try that, never thought of doing that.

- bushmaster

Thanks for your comment but honestly the idea is from T and J.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

909 posts in 486 days


#9 posted 06-19-2017 04:42 AM


Yes there is a special reason for the guide. Normally you can depend on the bearing, and I would have done that. But because the grooves the bearing would not follow a nice round contour. So the reason for this guide is to have a 100% round contour profile.

- Dutchy


Now that makes sense and I fully understand, however, then that raises the question of why kerf first and round-over later?
I always round over first and then kerf… but then again I kerf on the saw. In all fairness if (or better still when) I get around to building it, I will probably deviate from your plans and make a 3.2mm kerf… after all my audience/viewers will never get out their callipers and measure the .8mm difference.
Actually the real reason is that I haven’t goy a 4mm router bit.

Is it possible to use that guide for round wheels or is it only for square wheels?

- Dutchy


I MUST emphasise, the wheels have to be a perfect square. A rectangle will not turn so freely.

Talking about turning freely, I could see some loss in ease of rotation with the 4mm kerf hitting the straight edge of my suggested design.
Hmm… maybe I should make the “V” a tad over 1 meter long??? ... and of course build two supports for the router table to accommodate the oversized jig…

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

909 posts in 486 days


#10 posted 06-19-2017 04:50 AM


... Can I offer you a hint as you don t have a 4mm saw blade…

- Pjonesy


Ah, you Kiwi’s with good eye sight.

I just take my glasses off and the 3.2mm kerf blurs into 4mm… QED… problem solved!


Thanks for your comment but honestly the idea is from T and J.

- Dutchy


So I am guessing you didn’t invent the wheel either…

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD

View crowie's profile

crowie

1789 posts in 1616 days


#11 posted 06-19-2017 05:13 AM

The wheels have turned of great Dutchy..very much like your jig for rounding the edges…Thank you..

-- Lifes good, Enjoy each new day...... Cheers from "On Top DownUnder" Crowie

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2272 posts in 1834 days


#12 posted 06-19-2017 06:14 AM

- Dutchy
why kerf first and round-over later?
I always round over first and then kerf… but then again I kerf on the saw. In all fairness if (or better still when) I get around to building it, I will probably deviate from your plans and make a 3.2mm kerf… after all my audience/viewers will never get out their callipers and measure the .8mm difference.
Actually the real reason is that I haven t goy a 4mm router bit.

- LittleBlackDuck

Yes rounding the edge after the kerf was made is because the tearout. I have to explain something you can not see on the pictures. Rounding the R6 edge is done in 2 steps and more important the routing direction of the wood is the same as the router bit direction. Normally you only can do this on machines with mechanical transit and NOT on hobby machines where the wood is held by hand!!! However a round over from 6 mm is so small that when you do this in two steps there is in my opinium no danger.

There is another reason to do it with a router. Most of my blades are cross cut sawblades. I have one type af blade which is flat but this blad is only 2.8mm. And the 2.8 is in my opinium to small. Even 4 mm is small for the size of the wheels.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

909 posts in 486 days


#13 posted 06-19-2017 07:21 AM


... Most of my blades are cross cut sawblades. I have one type af blade which is flat but this blad is only 2.8mm….

- Dutchy

Dutchy, please don’t use the 10 guilders (still on it’s way… if you haven’t already received it) for an overseas trip but feel free to buy all the flat blades you will ever need from 2mm to 13mm in 1mm increments.

PS. I appreciate making use of what is available.

PPS. Stop writing ”hobby” on your machines and etch ”ernstig” on it. It’s the operator and not the machine that makes the job.

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2272 posts in 1834 days


#14 posted 06-19-2017 07:31 AM


... Most of my blades are cross cut sawblades. I have one type af blade which is flat but this blad is only 2.8mm….

- Dutchy

Dutchy, please don t use the 10 guilders (still on it s way… if you haven t already received it) for an overseas trip but feel free to buy all the flat blades you will ever need from 2mm to 13mm in 1mm increments.

PS. I appreciate making use of what is available.

PPS. Stop writing ”hobby” on your machines and etch ”ernstig” on it. It s the operator and not the machine that makes the job.

- LittleBlackDuck

This must be better:

Normally you only can do this on machines with mechanical transit and NOT on machines where the wood is held by hand!!!

All the money is there to buy the range between 2-13. Problem is that almost all european saw machines don’t have a spindle for blades thicker than 5mm.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

909 posts in 486 days


#15 posted 06-19-2017 07:56 AM

... routing direction of the wood is the same as the router bit direction. Normally you only can do this on machines with mechanical transit…

- Dutchy


Not sure if I accidentally blundered on a “solution”, however, when I rout the round over, I use a free standing bit with a locator pin (or whatever it’s called) in the middle of the table… without a fence.

I then remove the pin after staring,

I then rotate the wheel in 360° around the bit while rotating the wheel in it’s 360°. I do get minor tear-out but that was easily removed with my flap sander.

PS. Pictures taken using hired woodworking models.

-- There's two ways to do things... My way or the right way.. LBD

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