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Woodworking, Carpentery, Remodeling, et all...Lessons learned... How not to... #1: Humbling lessons, Mistakes made...

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Blog entry by Dusty posted 11-18-2007 03:23 PM 6584 reads 0 times favorited 59 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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Fellow Lumberjocks,

I figured I have made about every mistake and several blunders that are possible when it comes to woodworking, remodeling and while practicing other various crafts.

I have pulled off just about ever bone headed mistake any one human being could possibly make.

While writing my current blog series “This Old Mold House” I began thinking that it might be helpful to share some of my experiences in order that others may learn from them and perhaps benefit from my mistakes.

I am hoping others will add to this list and share there mishaps, lesson learned , all in the spirit of sharing and helping others to learn and practice the various trades and crafts not just limited to woodworking.

Many of these experiences are related to woodworking.

One such example could be safety items or tool uses.

I am going to try keep my “lessons learned” brief and see where this goes.

I invite others to share.

-- Dusty



59 comments so far

View Dusty's profile

Dusty

785 posts in 2822 days


#1 posted 11-18-2007 03:26 PM

Screw drivers are not chisels and chisels are not screw drivers.

-- Dusty

View Dusty's profile

Dusty

785 posts in 2822 days


#2 posted 11-18-2007 03:27 PM

When installing windows be sure the right side is up. This makes it much easier to close the window and it also keeps it from falling out.

-- Dusty

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 2903 days


#3 posted 11-18-2007 03:31 PM

Well, Dusty, that’s pretty profound there, but as I’ve learned in the past 2 years, is that this here learning curve never ends, and as much as I’d like I cannot tell another how the movie ends. And although great advice is helpful, as soon as you mention the chisel/screwdriver issue, somebody is sure to try one in place of the other.

View Dusty's profile

Dusty

785 posts in 2822 days


#4 posted 11-18-2007 03:32 PM

never clean your glasses, safety goggles or any other lens with a dry cloth.

they scratch the lens

Duh…

after replacing my second set of 300 dollar bi focals you would think I would learn this one.

-- Dusty

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4435 posts in 2628 days


#5 posted 11-18-2007 03:34 PM

When you install underlayment on the floor be sure that the furniture(cupboard) will fit under the ceiling when the new floor is in. I wound up with only 1/2 inch above Carleen’s cupboard when we put in the new floor.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View Dusty's profile

Dusty

785 posts in 2822 days


#6 posted 11-18-2007 03:37 PM

Obi ,

You are are so right.

I never stop learning, but I doubt I will or could live long enough to make all the mistakes so perhaps I can learn from others and have some fun along the way.

By the way, great to hear from you again. Its been a while. I”m sure you have been busy like myself.

With all the growth of this web site it is impossible to keep up with all the posts.

That is a good thing however.

:)

-- Dusty

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

2914 posts in 2562 days


#7 posted 11-18-2007 04:21 PM

I’ve learned that the old adage of “just get a bigger hammer” if something is not going to fit/work is really not the best thing. Things break using this method and then are you are back to square one.

I’ve learned that those who try to sell women “women’s tools” that are pink (!) really don’t understand woman who work with their hands. (I better get off this one or I could be here all day.)

I’ve learned to laugh when late at night a friend calls and says the toilet that the plumber installed is not working properly and came I come take a look. So I go, after all what are friends for? I get there and find out that not only did he replace the toilet that was cracked but the supply line as well. It turns out the “problem” was the water was not turned back on – he must have been a hurry and figured she’d know how to turn it on. Well after chuckling and rolling my eyes—- I bent down and turned on the supply line and in came the water. End of story right? WRONG! No leaks, the bowls was well seated, etc. I quickly found why the plumber did not want to turn on the water. He knew that the original plumber who built this house, and I can’t imagine how he did it, but he plumbed HOT water to the toilet tank. So I guess even professionals make bone-headed mistakes from time to time. She ended up living with the hot water for a day or two until we could get the original builder to come look and decide that he owed her a few hours of re-plumbing.

From this story I’ve learned to look over the shoulders of any workman I have at my house doing something that I know how to do, but cannot do for one reason or another. The job will be done right before they leave.

-- Like a bad penny, I keep coming back!

View rookster's profile

rookster

67 posts in 2816 days


#8 posted 11-18-2007 04:26 PM

1. Planning is not a substitute for mistakes, but it does help minimize them.

2. Rushing will almost always yield mistakes (like when I milled the groove for a run of box sides 1/4” lower than planned).

3. There’s always time to think things through before doing them, but there is not always time (or money) to redo things if you haven’t thought them through. (Can you say: Christmas projects never completed?). I’m trying to learn the “think twice” mentality: figure it out, then pause and think about how you might have gotten it wrong. It’s a tough habit to form.

-- Rookster, (http://www.robertkarl.org/woodworkingblog/)

View Karson's profile

Karson

34878 posts in 3066 days


#9 posted 11-18-2007 04:53 PM

When cutting stile and rail cuts on your door sides. make sure that the correct side is up. On router tables the back side should be up.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Karson's profile

Karson

34878 posts in 3066 days


#10 posted 11-18-2007 04:54 PM

When doing veneering. There is the condition of having too much glue.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

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Karson

34878 posts in 3066 days


#11 posted 11-18-2007 04:56 PM

When putting Tenons into mortises there is the condition of having too much glue.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

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Karson

34878 posts in 3066 days


#12 posted 11-18-2007 04:58 PM

When putting dowels into dowel holes there is the condition of having too much glue.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Dusty's profile

Dusty

785 posts in 2822 days


#13 posted 11-18-2007 05:24 PM

The flip side is not enough glue or glue that is beyond its expiration date or improper for the application your using it for.

-- Dusty

View Dadoo's profile

Dadoo

1767 posts in 2656 days


#14 posted 11-18-2007 05:33 PM

You cannot reuse dried glue by adding a little spit.

-- Bob Vila would be so proud of you!

View Dadoo's profile

Dadoo

1767 posts in 2656 days


#15 posted 11-18-2007 05:33 PM

Murphy’s Law applies to woodworking as well.

-- Bob Vila would be so proud of you!

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