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Cribbage Board Techniques #1: Vacation's Over

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Blog entry by Doodler posted 08-22-2007 02:29 PM 2920 reads 2 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Cribbage Board Techniques series Part 2: Finishing the Inlets »

Well I haven’t been here in a while. Summer is usually slow for cribbage board business and I actually spent two months doing no woodworking at all. First break I’ve had since I started making boards about 4 years ago. I did spend some time improving my shop and putting in a dust-collection system. I’ll update the pictures of it soon.

Anyway I was contacted by a potential customer who liked my newest board design (the paua rosa with maple burl board in my projects page). But he wanted it in gabon ebony with amboyna burl inlay. Wow. This would require a piece of ebony 6 1/4” x 20”. It’s rare to find good ebony beyond 5” wide. After several days of calling just about every wood supplier I could find on the internet I was about ready to give up. I decided to make a run over to Owl Hardwood in Des Plaines, though they seldom have decent ebony.

Well to my surprise I found the perfect piece of wood in fantastic condition. Almost exactly the right size… for $100. Good thing money is no object for this customer.

I fired up my miter saw, table saw and planer for the first time in months and that beautiful piece of ebony is now sitting on my worktable waiting for me to draw the pattern on it. This is going to be my best board yet.

-- Jeff, www.doodler.com



5 comments so far

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 3626 days


#1 posted 08-23-2007 01:29 PM

where’s the pix??

you know, before, during, after stages???

can’t wait to see the finished project. After your holiday from woodworking you must be really eager to create again! :) How exciting

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Doodler's profile

Doodler

22 posts in 3535 days


#2 posted 08-23-2007 04:21 PM

Here’s your picture. I just finished drafting the pattern onto the board. The tools I used are shown as well.

Drafted Ebony Board

When I first started making boards I tried several methods of creating patterns to transfer to the board, but I quickly found out that hand drafting the pattern each time is the only way to ensure perfection.

Next step: routing out the inlets with my Dremel…

-- Jeff, www.doodler.com

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 3626 days


#3 posted 08-24-2007 02:14 AM

that’s fascinating… I didn’t realize the layout would be so complex.
Looking forward to pix of the next step!

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Doodler's profile

Doodler

22 posts in 3535 days


#4 posted 08-25-2007 07:37 PM

Finally a nice day here in the Chicago area. We were without power almost all yesterday and our internet was knocked out for over a day. I have not had a chance in this chaos to do more work on the board, but I’ll get to it in the next day or two.

-- Jeff, www.doodler.com

View Doodler's profile

Doodler

22 posts in 3535 days


#5 posted 09-11-2007 10:24 PM

OK, after numerous delays the past week I finally got back to it. The next step is to route out the inlets. I use a Dremel rotary tool mounted in a router base with a 1/8” fishtail router bit to do all this work. With a fence attachment I cut the horizontal lines. I do a first pass with the router bit about 1/32 from the final edge, then a second pass after slightly adjusting the fence to get the cut right to the lines.

Routing the horizontal lines

I have to keep my mind alert and double check every move to make sure I don’t go over the vertical lines (which I did a couple times early on).

Next I do the vertical lines. I remove the fence attachment and use a clamping tool guide to guide the router base along the lines. The tool guide is clamped to the table on my left on top of a scrap piece of wood the same thickness as the ebony. Again I do it in two passes, but without a fence to make small adjustments with I use a small piece of 1/16” wood on which I scribed lines that show exactly where the top and bottom edges of the router bit will cut.

Routing the vertical lines

Yes, that is the amboyna burl which will be the inlay above the ebony.

After I cut all the horizontal and vertical lines I will carefully cut the curved segments by eyeball, keeping the bit to about 1/16” from the lines. I’ll post another entry when I’ve completed these steps in a couple of days.

-- Jeff, www.doodler.com

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