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Myrtle Anniversary Shaker Table #11: The Legs (Thanks for the Tip DenverDave)

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Blog entry by DoctorDan posted 08-10-2010 01:39 PM 911 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 10: Shaker Bench Design Part 11 of Myrtle Anniversary Shaker Table series Part 12: Ebony on my Curvy Legs... »

The legs. I’ve debated the leg long and hard. Thought of steam bending, bent lamination, straight grain timber, and combinations of the above. In the end I decided to join two pieces to maximize long grain strength… which of course means a joint in the middle.

After making a template, rough cutting and machining the piece, I then used a jigsaw to cut a closer but still rough outline of the leg.

Using a chisel, a marking knife and some patients I outlined my cuts.





And then started making some cuts…


Which made me a tail…

...and some pins…

With a bit of glue I got a rather nice joint.

Though, like all wood workers I’m my own worse critic. There are some gabs in the joint and between the two pieces. Some will need filling, some may need to be made a ‘feature’ of to correct. (Eg. one side as a 1-2mm gap on the face side, this may be replaced with a strip of timber mrytle or perhaps ebony.)

For those wondering about how the vertical leg piece will attach. I plan to use two small wedged m&t joints either side of the sliding dovetail.

-- Daniel - http://theloveofwood.blogspot.com/



4 comments so far

View dub560's profile

dub560

606 posts in 1609 days


#1 posted 08-10-2010 06:40 PM

that’s some badass hand skills you got there man. keep them pictures coming

-- Life is enjoyable especially when you borrow from people

View Cozmo35's profile

Cozmo35

2198 posts in 1732 days


#2 posted 08-10-2010 10:11 PM

Daniel, great job on the legs! I do inlay from time to time and there are almost always imperfections that need to be dealt with. I use the dust from my belt sander that accumulates when sanding the same type of wood that needs the gaps filled. I mix some wood glue to make a paste. Fill the gaps and sand it. Keep repeating this process and the gaps will fill to where they are undetectable by even the “worse critic”...aka – You.

-- If you don't work, you don't eat!.....Garland, TX

View DenverDave's profile

DenverDave

41 posts in 1546 days


#3 posted 08-11-2010 05:03 PM

Nice craftsmanship!

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112363 posts in 2273 days


#4 posted 08-11-2010 05:12 PM

Cool

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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