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Shop Notes #7: What do you do with rust?

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Blog entry by DocSavage45 posted 63 days ago 694 reads 0 times favorited 22 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 6: Using water bourn (based) stains (HELP!) Part 7 of Shop Notes series Part 8: Murphy's telling me to do this! Screwed up again! »

Working in the shop today. Haven’t done a glue up in awhile. Putting the bar clamps away I noticed pits and rust developing. The Harbor Freight are copies of The Jorgenson bar clamps, but they paint the ratchet bar. Guess what “lots of rust.” Even the Jorgensons are pitted.

I probably have not cleaned scrubbed some of them since I got them 13 years ago.

My Hammers and hand planes also have developed rust spots or a whole hammer full!

Took most of my shop time and cleaned all of my clamps. I haven’t even used some that had rust on them!

The summer here is pretty humid. When it’s hot my concrete floor is old and moisture comes through. Set up my old window ac but it’s not efficient and it is not running when I’m not there but my furnace is always puttin out at least 55 degrees. I add humidity in the winter.

I have purchased some blow shield, but just used steel wool, 220 sandpaper, and WD40.

What do other LJ’s do was my thought. So I’m asking What do you do?

Thanks

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher



22 comments so far

View Greg The Cajun Box Sculptor's profile

Greg The Cajun Box Sculptor

4739 posts in 1810 days


#1 posted 63 days ago

hey Tom…have you thought about giving everything a good coat of paste wax? I always keep the table tops of all tools waxed to help when pushing wood across them. It will also help in rust prevention. If you have rust problems ongoing maintenance is a necessity. WD40 will be good to clean the rust up but will make the tools oily and can stain wood.
There are many rust cleanup and prevention products you can buy also

-- Every step of each project is considered my masterpiece because I want the finished product to reflect the quality of my work. http://www.FineArtBoxes.com

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6467 posts in 1805 days


#2 posted 63 days ago

RUST…yuck..my shop has no concrete , its all wood and that must be a factor, my tools pretty much dont have to big of a problem, but sometimes i do…so i do basicly the same as you, wd40, steel wool or some 400 grit sand paper…and i think the biggest key is staying on it, if you dont , you get accumulation…and then its a real pain to get rid of, it pits…i mostly have surface rust, so stay on it, dont let it pit…thats all i know doc…

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4368 posts in 1344 days


#3 posted 63 days ago

Greg,

Have some Navel jelly. Oh yeah I hve the parts to do hydrolisis, but I’m still working on those two furniture rehab projects.

Yep I did a coat of paste wax. Guess I didn’t put that in the story. LOL!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4368 posts in 1344 days


#4 posted 63 days ago

Grizz, Thanks.

I had bought the wood to lay down a floor, but I had caused a problem when I jacked the wall of the shop and reframed it. The wall was about a 1/16th of an inch too big and when I rains hard I get seepage. We;ve had draught the past two years. Wood floors are easy on the legs.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View balidoug's profile

balidoug

363 posts in 980 days


#5 posted 63 days ago

In my old, outdoor shop in Bali I fought a running battle with corrosion. Humidity was high, even in the “dry” season, and with the sea less than a mile away ….

I put sachets of desiccant (that stuff you find in the bottom of chips bags that says “do not eat”) in the drawers of my tool cabinet to keep the humidity down, and that helped a lot. Problem is, you have to “recharge” it periodically by cooking it in the oven. The greater the humidity, the more often the need to recharge.

I used, with some success, a product called Corrosion X on planes, chisels, and saws. It seemed to work, as long as I was meticulous about applying it at the end of every work session. Forget once, and uh oh. Too, the product was a little pricey, and I have nothing to compare results to.

FWW did a piece a year or two ago comparing several products and interestingly WD-40 won.

For the occasions when time, climate, and/or indolence got the best of me, I found evapo-rust did a good job of cleaning things up.

-- From such crooked wood as that which man is made of, nothing straight can be fashioned. Immanuel Kant

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4368 posts in 1344 days


#6 posted 63 days ago

Ballidog,

My problems are small compared rto what you had to deal with, There is a downside to living in paradise. LOL!

Thanks!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Greg The Cajun Box Sculptor's profile

Greg The Cajun Box Sculptor

4739 posts in 1810 days


#7 posted 62 days ago

Tom…you could also get a dehumidifier. They really do a great job. My shop is insulated with spray foam and never has a rust problem…but I also have a 12×20 shed that I use for storage and lumber that is not insulated. I run a dehumidifier in the shed and it is kept rust free and dry.

-- Every step of each project is considered my masterpiece because I want the finished product to reflect the quality of my work. http://www.FineArtBoxes.com

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4368 posts in 1344 days


#8 posted 62 days ago

Greg,

Have a couple in my basement. One goes to a drain the other shuts off when full. I hope to get a more efficient Window AC to match the volume of my shop space.

Thanks for the suggestion.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

109336 posts in 2079 days


#9 posted 62 days ago

I think I agree with most of the suggestions except how you clean your machineries tops, I would never use steel wool because your leaving little metal particles all over your shop,plus contaminating your finishes (particularly water base finishes) I use and old Random orbital sander with some scotch bright pads underneath and some automotive rubbing compound. This takes off even heavy rust ,after the bulk of the rust is off I use a soft rage under the ROS and clean of the excess,then after all of the rubbing compound is off and the soft rags cannot pick up any more rust or dirt,then I use a soft rag and ROS to apply automotive wax.This makes for a long lasting slick surface for all of your machinery

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View PhilBello's profile

PhilBello

65 posts in 469 days


#10 posted 62 days ago

Hi Tom,
I give every metal tool however small, a light coat of WD40 every year, and I have had no problems!

-- If you want the rainbow, you got to put up with the rain - Steven Wright

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4368 posts in 1344 days


#11 posted 62 days ago

Jim,

Thanks again. I’m pretty regular about my cabinet saw and my old craftsman. The “but statement” is I set a cleaner bottle on my band saw and I hadn’t been in the shop due to my other paying job, and humidity had formed under the bottle ! I used Emory sand paper, I’d also used a 330 grit on my oscillating sander. Then rubbing compound. After getting the oxidation off I put a coat of Johnson’s paste wax on it.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4368 posts in 1344 days


#12 posted 62 days ago

Phil,

I wonder how your new shop will affect your tools. I wish I had more time, energy, or some interested nieghbor kids, as I think I need to seal my OLD concrete?

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Benji Reyes's profile

Benji Reyes

290 posts in 1580 days


#13 posted 62 days ago

Hi Tom,
Some of the carving tools that I use I get from Baligog’s paradise. They are some of the best blades but rust fast when they get in contact with water. I store them in a wooden box during the monsoon season after every use and give them a coat of WD40. It all works for me. Did you know that the main ingredient for WD40 is fish oil? I wonder if Grizzman ever used it for some of his mean cooking. LOL

-- Benji Reyes, Antipolo, Philippines, http://www.facebook.com/pages/Benji-Reyes/88321902103?ref=ts

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4368 posts in 1344 days


#14 posted 62 days ago

Benji,

So maybe my shop cats are causing the rust? LOL! didn’t know that about WD40!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6467 posts in 1805 days


#15 posted 62 days ago

a big fat can sits between my salt and pepper

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

showing 1 through 15 of 22 comments

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