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Shop Notes #6: Using water bourn (based) stains (HELP!)

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Blog entry by DocSavage45 posted 66 days ago 612 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 5: Finishing it? Part 6 of Shop Notes series Part 7: What do you do with rust? »

Picked up some Minwax (water based stain) at my local box store. I’m used to oil based as I have a lot of it. Can’t remember if I did it intentionally LOL! Have used it when I did my refurbishing of my office sofa. That was over a 4 ought steel wool rub down of the sofa frame pieces.

Working on my last two furniture pieces I’m refurbishing for the office. Will post the pieces per requests from fellow LJ’s

Keeping this topic narrowed to the stain, I’m wondering if any of you have used it? Did you use and apply according to directions?

In one place it says leave stain on 3 to 5 minutes before wiping, and in another place in directions it says “do not leave stain on for more than three minutes” Really?

Ok, to apply oil based stains I usually do a seal coat then work the stain.

In this case the directions do not ask for this step.

OK….. I sanded the top down on my little desk. It has alternating walnut and I’m guessing maple boards? But it was an opaque stained or painted top that had an even dark brown coat, but scratched, scraped and blotched. Now sanded to 220 grit. Looking to make the surface match the desk design; Art Deco features.

Want to even out the surface tone wise. Don’t understand use of light and dark woods . Maybe what was available, but not part of the design.

Looking for experienced advice! Thanks

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher



9 comments so far

View andyboy's profile

andyboy

474 posts in 1773 days


#1 posted 66 days ago

Tom.
I hate water based stain with a passion.
I bought 5 cans about 10 yr ago and took them all back. I just couldn’t get an even finish. I even asked the supplier to demonstrate and he selected a new off the shelf brush and spent 45 minutes unsuccessfully trying to prove me wrong.
I made a student strip his work 3 times before returning to the oil. To make it worse for the poor guy, he had a lot of lattice work.
Oil or spirit unless things have changed.
Tiny areas are easy, but detailed areas a nightmare!!!!

-- Andy Halewoodworker. You can't finish if you don't finish. So finish it, because finish is everything.

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4360 posts in 1342 days


#2 posted 66 days ago

Andy,

Looking to produce an even color although the wood is light and dark. Wold you not use a seal coat and just work on light areas?

Like I said the design is Art Deco. ( Oh yeah, it’s bad construction as well. Want to get through it, vs. making a beautiful piece. This thing appears to be EARLY IKEA!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4360 posts in 1342 days


#3 posted 66 days ago

Would it be simpler to use contact cement and cut a top from veneer?

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

109270 posts in 2077 days


#4 posted 66 days ago

Water borne dyes and stains are totally different than what they were ten years ago, in time that’s all that will be available.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4360 posts in 1342 days


#5 posted 66 days ago

Have you run into this? Any suggestions? Thanks!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6462 posts in 1803 days


#6 posted 66 days ago

i dont have any experience so i wont comment, but i will say something….i rarely..ever use stain..wish i could help…hope it all turns out

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4360 posts in 1342 days


#7 posted 66 days ago

Thanks Bob,

Trial and a lot of error? LOL!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

109270 posts in 2077 days


#8 posted 66 days ago

Tom
I’ve been using waterborne topcoats for years and the last few years I’ve been using water base dye stain.The advantage of dye is that every time you put you put another coat on it your wood gets darker,so this way you have a lot more control of the color your putting on. Most stains seal the wood after the first or second coat making it impossible to get your wood any darker. This is why I would select a dye over stain. If you want a quick and dirty fix just paint it a wood color and clear coat it.

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2020491/22648/General-Finishes-Water-Based-Dye-Cinnamon-Pint.aspx?keyword=brandGeneral_Finishes_and_adwords_labelsWater_Based&refcode=10INGOPB&device=c&network=g&matchtype=&gclid=CKOMr8Gjw7wCFVJcfgodMlgA_w

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4360 posts in 1342 days


#9 posted 66 days ago

Thanks!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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