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Shop Notes #5: Finishing it?

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Blog entry by DocSavage45 posted 02-05-2014 02:21 AM 1102 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Finally A GoodDay in the Shop and outside of the shop! How was your day? Part 5 of Shop Notes series Part 6: Using water bourn (based) stains (HELP!) »

Out in the shop today working on my desk chair which is a found item from a resale shop many years ago. Thought it had some character. It’s been sitting gathering dust and cat hair for a few years now.

Just decided to refurbish it for my reopened office. Thought it was mahogany but it turns out it is 1/3rd mahogany.

I was going to rub down the finish with four ought (o#0000) steel wool and put a coat of stain and poly on it. When I go started it needed to be taken apart as most of the fluted dowel pins were dried out.

Then I decided to remove the finish. Sanded to 220 grit, but that took awhile. Found that there are various species under the finish.

the woods have different densities and some small knots.

Not the best for a fluted leg chair in an Art Deco style? Today I put on a seal coat, and bought chestnut stain.

There is a lot of time in this chair (sanding the fluted parts and the routed groves in the arms.) It will be stronger and it will last a while longer. But boy how they made cheap furniture way back when.

I was wondering what would other people do?

What would be your method for doing this?

If it were all mahogany I’d just go with natural finish.

But I am learning as I make my mistakes. LOL!

What would be your go to finish? and why?

Thanks

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher



12 comments so far

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7192 posts in 2057 days


#1 posted 02-05-2014 02:28 AM

i would go with a semi gloss lacquer, one its a hard finish and two it wont yello , inless you use the water base poly, but i like lacquer, it dries fast also…thats my go to ..

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5376 posts in 1596 days


#2 posted 02-05-2014 02:48 AM

Thanks Bob,

haven’t used it. Have had a few people really like it for its quick results.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112937 posts in 2330 days


#3 posted 02-05-2014 03:05 AM

Hi Tom
A photo might help. If all of the woods are different in color a stain might not get it all to look a like,if they are alike you might be able to get it to work with a gel stain. Before you try anything I would wipe it down a couple times with some naphtha to make sure you have a 100% clear of contaminants . Another way to go might be to use some dye to blend the unlike woods color together.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5376 posts in 1596 days


#4 posted 02-05-2014 03:08 AM

Thanks,

You sound like someone we know. LOL! Local ace does not have much. And it’s between 34 and 44 miles to get to a store like Lowes.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Radu's profile

Radu

305 posts in 1797 days


#5 posted 02-05-2014 03:22 AM

Not an expert advice, and not knowing how the chair looks but here is what I would do: a seal coat of shellac followed by a light sanding. Then a coat of say colonial pine and then a darker stain – walnut – heavier closer to the joints and lighter in between. Then a few coats of lacquer or shellac. It’ll be kind of rustic look.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112937 posts in 2330 days


#6 posted 02-05-2014 03:40 AM

Ha Ha There’s this crazy thing called the internet you go to,you send them money and the send you stuff :)

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5376 posts in 1596 days


#7 posted 02-05-2014 05:19 AM

Jim, Your right about the net! Use it all the time. Checked my bank statement today. Got to stop eBay and Amazon one-click. Oh yeah I have to file my insurance billing or I may have to “let me go.” LOL!

Radu, that’s what I’ve got in the shop. my walnut stain is water bourne. I have gotten some chestnut oil stain cause that was available. Sealed it today as I have to move forward.

Thanks for the ideas.! And methods of attack! It’s appreciated.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Dave's profile

Dave

11205 posts in 1593 days


#8 posted 02-06-2014 01:29 PM

I would get the different woods to near the same color.
Then start rubbing it down with a poly rub and steel wool. Over and over and over.
Poly Rub
1 part Polyurathane
1 part Boiled Linseed oil

Finish the last few coats with a lint free cloth.
IMHO

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5376 posts in 1596 days


#9 posted 02-06-2014 06:26 PM

Dave,

I have been gathering some great information here. I think the Poly Rub is an off shoot of the mix Sam Maloof used?

Thanks!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Dave's profile

Dave

11205 posts in 1593 days


#10 posted 02-06-2014 07:42 PM

Yes you are correct.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View Benji Reyes's profile

Benji Reyes

297 posts in 1832 days


#11 posted 02-07-2014 02:31 AM

I almost missed out on this Tom> Without a photo, I can only imagine the fluted legs and the routed arm rests with only its raised parts sanded to #360 and finished in oil and bees wax. It will give the grooves more depth and character…Overall the chair. But then again your the best person who knows how my imagination goes. Lol. Have fun with it!

-- Benji Reyes, Antipolo, Philippines, http://www.facebook.com/pages/Benji-Reyes/88321902103?ref=ts

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5376 posts in 1596 days


#12 posted 02-07-2014 05:40 AM

Benji.

Thanks for sharing. Found the chair back is wracked. My wife asked about the legs when I showed her the results of 8 hors of sanding. “Is there something wrong with the legs?” It was a cheap production piece. With character. Why I took the time. Did a seal coat and sanded, then oil based stain. 36 hrs still not dry! Only 55 in my shop, when it’s 39 below outside.

It has shape and design potential for better quality wood. Bought it long ago before I became more wood smart!

Thanks for your input!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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