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who makes a decent grinding stone?

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Blog entry by DocSavage45 posted 05-04-2012 09:57 PM 4217 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Have asked You LJ’s for yor opinions and they have been quite Helpful. Need to sharpen my chisels to do some turning on my new lathe. Richard Raffan suggests the white grinding stones on a bench grinder. so far so good.

Go to Amazon where I usually get to see reviews before buying.

Norton Premium White Bench and Pedestal Abrasive Wheel, Type 01 Straight, Aluminum Oxide, 1” Arbor, 6” Diameter x 3/4” Thickness, Grit Fine 100 (Pack of 1) which appears close to what is recomended is seriously lacking. recieves 2 stars? So I’m wondering what you turners might suggest.

Want to start with sharp tools so they will be less dangersous. LOL

Thanks for your input.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher



9 comments so far

View studie's profile

studie

618 posts in 1803 days


#1 posted 05-05-2012 03:31 AM

Im setting up my Ridgid oscillating drum sander to sharpen things, hope to get some finer sleeves than #220 then hone the rest. A simple fence square to the table and a few jigs for chisels and or angles has ben ok but I may make some steel jigs for more accuracy. I would also like to have a variable speed on this but otherwise it works great for a hollow ground edge.

-- $tudie

View JimDaddyO's profile

JimDaddyO

287 posts in 1735 days


#2 posted 05-05-2012 10:48 AM

I worked for 10 years grinding bearings for both the automotive and aerospace industries. Our company used Norton wheels exclusively.

-- I still have all my fingers

View JamesRJ's profile

JamesRJ

5 posts in 827 days


#3 posted 06-16-2012 07:58 PM

I have been turning wood since 1983. The stone I use is a 46 grit white Norton. I also use a grinding jig each time simply because it allows me to sharpen without grinding away my tool. I certainly can sharpen freehand, and did so for 20+ years, but I also bought more gouges than I needed to. In fact, now I simply let the grinder (3600 rpm, 8”) get up to speed, then turn it off and sharpen while it coasts down. Doing it this way, you learn to sharpen, not grind.

Now, 98% of woodturners will tell you that the 46 grit stone is way too coarse. That you need an 80 to 120 grit. But here is my theory: The coarse stone leaves a serrated edge on the tool, which cuts more like a saw than a razor. Meaning it severs the fibers of the wood easier, cooler, and actually cleaner than one sharpened on a finer stone. Also, if you plan to sand, do not hone the edge. I only know about 2 people that can actually turn a very smooth surface that does not need to be sanded.

Get (or make) a grinding jig, use a 46 grit white stone, and enjoy turning. Remember, the most common mistake in woodturning is not sharpening often enough.

JamesRJ

View BigYin's profile

BigYin

231 posts in 1072 days


#4 posted 06-16-2012 08:23 PM

I use both the ruby red 80 grit and blue ceramic 100 grit stones for sharpening.

http://www.toolpost.co.uk/pages/Grinding_Systems/O_Donnell/Grinding_Wheels/grinding_wheels.html

The old style Sil-Car wheels are relegated for rough work

-- ... Never Apologise For Being Right ...

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5006 posts in 1498 days


#5 posted 06-16-2012 09:39 PM

James, thx and you have 36 years lol of doing it. I was thinking 6 inch x 1 inch wheels,but recently told that might cause a problem? Have a bench grinder still in the box. thought about using a voltage regulator if I can to slow it down.

Big Yin looked at theweb page. LOL Costs are in Pond sterling not dollars paper. LOL!

Wow this post is 44 days old, :-)

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View JamesRJ's profile

JamesRJ

5 posts in 827 days


#6 posted 06-16-2012 11:26 PM

Doc Savage, I used a 6 inch grinder for 25 years, never had a problem. It just makes the grind a little more hollow than an 8” grinder. Some people use belt sanders for sharpening, but in my experience, you need the hollow grind. My reasoning is this: sooner or later you will hit a harder spot than average, and the tool will be lifted minutely from the wood. This leaves a tiny bump. If you have a hollow grind, the bump ends up in the hollow and it does not start a spiral ridge, like can happen with a flat grind. I am sure that if you have turned very much you have had these spiral ridges happen to you. Right?
JamesRJ

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5006 posts in 1498 days


#7 posted 06-17-2012 12:13 AM

James,

just read your home page info. You have the workingmans cave. LOL! I just purchased the Harbor Frieght 3/4 horse Lathe awhile back. Last turning was in High school woodshop! 40 years back.LOL The lathe is well thought of and seems prettywell constructed.

a dull tool is a dangerous tool is all I know. I bought some HSS chisels which were also pretty good. Bought it to turn a column for a table a friend asked me to build by his design. He found what he wanted at a gaage sale! LOL!

Dull tool, dangerous tool? So I have been sharpening my chisels. did thirty of them, ready to go. some cheapies but now sharp. I have been reading which is how I am learning and DVD’s Have Richard Raffan’s wood turning and going by what I see him do?

Don’t have a chuck as of yet. Have had some suggestions. So a complex answer to your simple qustion???

Haven’t done enough to know yet. LOL!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View JamesRJ's profile

JamesRJ

5 posts in 827 days


#8 posted 06-17-2012 01:02 AM

Tom, you could not do much better than Richard Raffan. He was a guest speaker/demonstrator at the Austin, TX woodturning club shortly after I was president of that club. Was invited to have dinner with him. A most interesting man, and a master at what he does which is turn and teach.

Most of the chucks available nowadays are good. I am not talking about the 3 jaw machinist chuck, but instead the 4 jaw woodturners chucks. I like the Stronghold brand, made in Canada by One Way Lathe co. I think you can order them directly from One Way via the internet.

The Harbor Freight lathe(s) are not the worst in the world. That distinction belongs to Sears, Roebuck. May I put in a plug for a Jet Mini? I have 2, my wife has another. Everyone I know who has one keeps it around for smaller items if it is not their only lathe. Only time a used one is available is upon the death of a turner!! Basically, ‘I’ll die before I get rid of my Jet Mini!’ Higher praise cannot be given.

Yeah, sharp tools always!! Bears repeating: most common mistake among woodturners is not sharpening often enough. You don’t sharpen because the tool is dull-you sharpen because it is not as sharp as it can be.

Go to woodturner.org This is the website of the American Association of Woodturners. See if there is a club nearby. If so, contact them, go to some meetings, meet some turners, go to their shops. Always happy to help a newbie out.

Best regards, James R. Johnson

View BigYin's profile

BigYin

231 posts in 1072 days


#9 posted 06-17-2012 06:34 AM

DocSavage45
The prices are in Sterling cuz I am in England.
Its upto interested parties to find them or their equivalent in their home country

Shorty

-- ... Never Apologise For Being Right ...

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