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The Studio Furniture Movement #2

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Blog entry by DocSavage45 posted 1326 days ago 1428 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Just found “Art for Everyday by Patricia Conway 1990. She has done an excellent job of exploring furniture as functional art.

Furniture has always served as functional. the Arts and Crafts movement had a big effect on putting the man/person back into the equation. architechs like Wright, designed furniture to be part of the art of his designs. Beautiful pieces that are not very comfortable to sit in. The Arts and Crafts movement ended in 1919. The Bau Haus inspired new ideas in furniture and design.

Wharton Esherick was a sculpor who made furniture with an organic form. In the 50’s and 60’s George Nakashima, Sam Maloof, and John Makepeace continued the movement. Then master Tage Fried taught furniture at the college level.

Others like Wendell Castle, and James Krenov emphasized the feeling that furniture and wood give us.

Castle has since progressed into forms other than wood but follows the “feelig” of furniture.

George Nakashima learned his woodworking skills from a Japanese master craftsman while interned in the “camps” He was trained as an architect and worked in Japan as well although an american citizen. The end of the war had Mr. Nakashima building functional furniture for people and later in extended to the natural organic form of the tree itself.

Most recently, I ran across Howard Werner Who sculpts furniture out of a solid block of wood. His tools are chain saws, power planers and grinders.

Later,

DoSavage45

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher



5 comments so far

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4361 posts in 1343 days


#1 posted 1326 days ago

MY mentors are out there, just have to find them.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View daltxguy's profile

daltxguy

1373 posts in 2415 days


#2 posted 1300 days ago

True legends Doc. Unfortunately this generation of woodworkers is passing. Who is going to take their place ( or who is taking their place)? Howard Werner is interesting but not in the same league or the same aesthetic ( sorry Howard).

-- If you can't joint it, bead it!

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4361 posts in 1343 days


#3 posted 1300 days ago

Steve, Many are called but few are choosen? As I Google studio furniture, I find many well made pieces. Check out my friend Charles Neil. He is a character with the drive of our heros. And there are a few people in the movement (Charles is not, more southern american antiques) who share a similar esthetic. Maybe a topic for my next blog? Right now I have had to do survival things like make money. :)
I reviewed your blog, where you are sounds like a great place to evolve? Don’t think I will ever touch the hand of god, but hey we can see it from here on the ground? I have found my asthetic.

Check out Pitney and Ames webb page. Sort of the past and current history of studio furniture. And You may already know what’s there but I want to share the ride. LOL

Thanks for your comment.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View daltxguy's profile

daltxguy

1373 posts in 2415 days


#4 posted 1296 days ago

Thomas, My own opinion of what has made these people great and what force binds them together was that each was doing his own thing, with a passion and grace and perhaps the touch of god which tapped into an aesthetic which is both enduring ( the connection of the material to the natural world) and which resonated with people at the time. Their talent went beyond their work but represented an outlook on life, a philosophy, their work and views coming from standing on the shoulders of giants before them and that always ultimately endures. They strike me as people who ‘get it’.

I don’t think these people were all following the same path or were followers of each other necessarily or were even aware that they would ever be put in the same sentence.

In some cases it was their unwavering passion which endured even when it went out of fashion but later came back into fashion. Esherick remained arts and crafts even when the space age 50’s was hailing modern materials and no one was interested in his work anymore.

A term I hear bantered around more these days is the “New Frugality”. This leaves me hopeful that a new generation will once again come to the fore who shares the same aesthetic and passion for the materials and the craftsmanship as these masters. We will come full circle again

I would put forward our very own LJ, Benji Reyes as an example of a person who expresses this aesthetic in our times.

-- If you can't joint it, bead it!

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4361 posts in 1343 days


#5 posted 1296 days ago

Checked it out. very creative. Talent and aesthetics are important, as well as drive. And of course someone to buy what we make? I know some pretty creative guys, who’s work I like, who are having difficulty staying afloat. Others are well established. But even these guys are not selling. Many of the people in the initial movement did know each other, just didn’t admit it. I agree they built on the shoulders of giants. But you know what I am only talking about as you are finding your way. I hope I can get on this path which is strewn with debree that I am cleaning up. LOL

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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