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Bath Stool #4: How to...

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Blog entry by Diego Cassels posted 04-10-2018 12:51 PM 479 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Sketch in 3D and dimentions Part 4 of Bath Stool series Part 5: Angled Tenon and Mortise »

Well there is not one way to do things, so here we go with the thinking HOW to do it!

I´ve decided that the legs should have a 12° angled slope, so I have to figure out how to make the mortise under the seat with a 12° incline. Any ideas, sugestions are very welcome.

I’ve also decided to create a saddle look to the seat, so I rememberd that a lumberjock “woodshaver Tony C” had suggested me to look at his way of doing it, jig to cut saddles in the stool seat’s

I like his approch so I’ll give it a try, I will try a smaller version of this jig.

Here is the rough cuts of the stool, I like this wood!
Here is a small text taken from wikipedia
Quebracho (also known as Luciano malo) is a common name in Spanish to describe very hard (density 1.15 – 1.35) wood tree species. The etymology of the name derived from quiebrahacha, or quebrar hacha, meaning “axe-breaker”.
These species provide tannin and a very hard, durable timber.

-- Diego Cassels



5 comments so far

View sras's profile

sras

4805 posts in 3151 days


#1 posted 04-10-2018 03:01 PM

For the angled joint, I’d suggest cutting the tenon at an angle and have the mortise be strgaight in.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View Diego Cassels's profile

Diego Cassels

79 posts in 104 days


#2 posted 04-10-2018 03:11 PM



For the angled joint, I d suggest cutting the tenon at an angle and have the mortise be strgaight in.

- sras


Sras, I hadn´t thought of it this way. Thanks. Do you have any example to look at?

-- Diego Cassels

View Diego Cassels's profile

Diego Cassels

79 posts in 104 days


#3 posted 04-10-2018 03:23 PM

Is this what you suggest?
Mortise and Tenon - Angled Components

-- Diego Cassels

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1600 posts in 3580 days


#4 posted 04-10-2018 04:03 PM

I would do a large set of loose tenons if possible. That way you can focus on your intersecting angle on the main parts and make the mortises square to the mating surfaces. This is the way I do it whenever I have splayed legs of any kind. Much easier than any kind of integral tenons at an angle.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View Diego Cassels's profile

Diego Cassels

79 posts in 104 days


#5 posted 04-10-2018 06:06 PM

Thanks CaptainSkully.
Greene & Greene Knife Block that you made is very intresting!


I would do a large set of loose tenons if possible. That way you can focus on your intersecting angle on the main parts and make the mortises square to the mating surfaces. This is the way I do it whenever I have splayed legs of any kind. Much easier than any kind of integral tenons at an angle.

- CaptainSkully


-- Diego Cassels

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