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Large Dinning Table 6' Round-8' with leaf. #1: Looking for plans for an oak 6' round that extend to 8'. Was wanting to if plans were available.

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Blog entry by DennisD posted 03-17-2012 01:33 AM 2142 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Large Dinning Table 6' Round-8' with leaf. series Part 2: Staining Red Oak »

Perhaph the project is too complicated and I should tell my son that he need to go to a furniture store, but I wanted to make a 6” round 1.5” thick Oak dinning table with a leaf that extended it to 8’. The top is probably the easy part the legs and support is where I’m stuck. I have done some searches on the web and found plenty at 48-60”. Need it bigger with proper support. Help?
Thanks

-- Dennis,Houston,



6 comments so far

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BigTiny

1676 posts in 2356 days


#1 posted 03-17-2012 02:19 AM

With some extenders it isn’t the total finished size but the ammount of extension that counts. There are several that can handle the 24 inches you want.

You can also make your own from hardwood if you want. I’d go with a double pedastle model myself, but four solid legs would work too.

Paul

-- The nicer the nice, the higher the price!

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BigTiny

1676 posts in 2356 days


#2 posted 03-17-2012 02:51 AM

I just checked Lee Valley’s web site and they carry the extenders that go up to either 26” or 46” depending on the model you choose. Costs are under $40 for the smaller one and under $60 for the larger.

Look on their site under hardware: table hardware: extenders.

Hope this helps.

Paul

-- The nicer the nice, the higher the price!

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DennisD

28 posts in 2774 days


#3 posted 03-17-2012 11:50 AM

Thanks… I will look at the extenders. Have you seen any plans?

-- Dennis,Houston,

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BigTiny

1676 posts in 2356 days


#4 posted 03-18-2012 03:14 AM

What I would do is to lay out your semi-circular parts and cut them out and do whatever jointing you’ve decided on to keep the boards together. If you’re using a 1.5 inch thick wood, you may want to thin the edges down to one inch for a lighter, more delicate look, then rout the edge profile you’ve chosen. Next, lay out and cut the insert board(s) and thin them and edge rout them the same as the rounded parts.

Now for the supports. For a round extension table I’d use a hexagonal support system with a point at the edge of the circle 90 degrees from the middle cut so you have support for that part of the circle that is the most fragile, the arc hanging over the edge with the grain running across the table. This leaves you with two sides of the hexagon cut in half at the center of the table to insert the exyensions. Now you lay out the location of the extenders, fitting them as far apart as possible inside the hex supports. (the points of the hexagon should be set back from the table edge an inch and a half)

Alternately, you can go with a curved skirt board set back about 3 inches from the edge. You would attach a skirt to the extension pieces too. This leaves more room to fit the extenders and supports the edges better and looks better too, but is harder to do as you have to make the curved skirt boards and attach the legs to them with rabbet and tenon joinery.

To make the skirts, your best bet is laminating them from thin layers of the same wood as the table. They give you an opportunity for some great decoration using inlay.

If you want, I can try to do some SketchUp diagrams to make this clearer, but that’ll take a while…

By the way, the most impressive table like this I’ve seen from a design point of view was a single pedastal one where the pedastal split in two to extend it. A very massive pedastal indeed. The main part was over a foot in diameter and the base it sat on was about four feet across.

Paul

-- The nicer the nice, the higher the price!

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DennisD

28 posts in 2774 days


#5 posted 03-19-2012 02:25 AM

Thanks… I think that I can do the top like you sugested. The base is the issue. I have looked a furniture stores web sites and found a few with the split single pedastal table. It looks like a project in itself to make. I have scheth on my computer but have not taken any classes to get to know how to use it Any help you can offer is appreciated.

-- Dennis,Houston,

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BigTiny

1676 posts in 2356 days


#6 posted 03-21-2012 12:53 PM

SketchUp has a number of video lessons for beginners on their web site. They’re quite well done and are easy to follow.

As for the table, the easiest way to go is four sturdy legs and a good, substantial skirt set into the legs. The hardest part of that is laminating the skirt boards. They provide most of the stability to the legs so they have to be solidly made. A vacuum press is the best way to make them, but a form and a bunch of clamps works okay too if you can;t get your hands on a vacuum press.

Good luck with the build. Take your time, plan ahead and take it one step at a time. You’ll be surprised how much you’re capable of if you take it in steps.

Paul

-- The nicer the nice, the higher the price!

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