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Curly Fries Anyone?? My Dads Company. A Story.

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Blog entry by Delta356 posted 04-23-2013 06:10 PM 1281 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Hi all. This is really not woodworking related, but I thought I would share with you guys the Frey History.. Well maybe in Curly Fry Technology.. Anyways I have created my father a youtube page for his company and what services he provides. Now that I’m older he is letting me have more freedom with his company, and letting me bring the future to his company. Those baby boomers can’t let go of the past…LOL… Your a freaking Hippie DAD : ) He’s always saying I’m a better business man then he is. I don’t think so, he’s been doing 100,000’s jobs. since 1985. Me NOOOO. Not let anyways. Anyways my Dad and Grandad started FREY TURBODYNAMICS LTD. in 1985. Portland, OR. USA. My Grandfather was a mechanical /design Engineer, rest his soul. He passed away on Sept 11 2012. My father is a mechanical Engineer. With both those brains they were on a constant high to invent and create. Food processing got into the picture.. Still don’t know how that happened. Anyways in 1990 they were contacted by a company called….. Classified… At the time about 6 companies were competing to create the mass production curly fry machine. My dad told me how secretive it was. He told me all drawings had to be sent in a classified envelope with break seal. Not once could my father contact through the phone. All inquires and talks had to be person to person… My father said the last time he dealt with such a secret project, was when he was in the Army Core of Engineers and was working on a nuclear sub somewhere in the Navade desert. Anyways after 2 years passed the product was done. The Water Turbine Curly Fry machine was born, and my fathers machines were serving the public curly fires. CHINA DON’T YOU THINK ABOUT TAKING THIS IDEA. THIS BABY WILL ALWAYS BE AMERICAN MADE…! The curly fries you get at ARBY’S and HARDIES, and even curly fries in England and Down Under AU are made by his machines. Anyways if you got a second check out the link to the youtube page. Also theres a video attached about FREY TURBODYNAMICS LTD.

Why have I made woodworking a profession?

http://www.youtube.com/channel/UC11kO7QqEnj4N2nHXSZz-IQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAM61YBWh4c (video)

Thanks, Michael Frey
Portland, OR



8 comments so far

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

15959 posts in 1553 days


#1 posted 04-23-2013 06:31 PM

Wonderful story, Michael. Long live the good old (and knew :) ) American ingenuity. I went to engineering school in Mechanical Engineering and have built a few machines from scratch along the way. I really love it as well as machine work and metal fabrication. However, I never invented anything that I can remember – maybe I solved a few problems along the way. To invent a machine like they did is quite an accomplishment – especially a commercially successful machine like your father and grandfather did. My hat is off to them for their accomplishments and I do hope they received all that was due to them because of their engineering ventures.

As you may remember I learned of your relationship with your Grandfather through Lumberjocks and I remember how much you respected and admired him and how much he helped you. I’m truly sorry for yours and your father’s loss.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1854 posts in 2247 days


#2 posted 04-23-2013 07:05 PM

Way cool. Always have admired the men who can make stuff like that.

-- Joe

View Delta356's profile

Delta356

463 posts in 1540 days


#3 posted 04-23-2013 07:12 PM

Helluvawreck, thank you for the kind words. It sucked he passed, but showed me a lot, metal wise… I learned to use the milling machine at the age of 6, and the lathe at 10.. I always remember when he said to me. If you hurt yourself on these machines, it would be your fault. Mom did not like that.. The Liberty 13 by 28 still runs great and the SELECT Milling machine runs great too… Don’t really use them to much, Woodworking does not call for it to much. Me and papas are discussing adding small machine services to FREY TURBODYNAMICS LTD. The Small machine shops died out here about 5 years ago. But it seems there are need for them again. Out here anyways…
Have a great week..

Thanks, Michael Frey
Portland, OR

View Delta356's profile

Delta356

463 posts in 1540 days


#4 posted 04-23-2013 07:14 PM

Thanks ajosephg…

Thanks, Michael Frey
Portland, OR

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

15959 posts in 1553 days


#5 posted 04-23-2013 07:28 PM

I built my machine shop in the plant up over 30 years but I lost it along with all of my mechanical stuff that I had collected for over 40 years. It was all in our molding plant that burned to the ground last August. I loved that shop and spent a many a fine hours in it but you can’t live in the past. You have to find strength in what remains behind or you will wither and grow old and die before your time. Reach for the stars, Michael. I’m sure that you will do both your grandfather and father proud. Your just a young man and have your whole life ahead of you. :)

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Delta356's profile

Delta356

463 posts in 1540 days


#6 posted 04-23-2013 07:32 PM

Thanks, sorry to hear about your shop.. I don’t know what I would do if my woodshop burned down…Just thinking of it gives me chillssssss… Your never to old to start collecting the machines and things again.

Thanks, Michael Frey
Portland, OR

View clieb91's profile

clieb91

3292 posts in 2621 days


#7 posted 04-23-2013 08:40 PM

Michael, It is great to see a thriving Machine Shop in the US. They do seem to be so far and few between these days.Machine shop is something all should be aware of, and yet I am a graduate of vocational school and even the school has cut it curriculum in that field. My grandfather is a retired master machinist and worked for many years on the waterfront in Philadelphia. He will be 92 this year and still works daily on making dollhouses and other miniature buildings.He uses his machinist tools and other power tools to get tight tolerances. He taught me a lot over the years and I owe my interest in woodworking to him. Quite sorry to hear about the loss of you grandfather, sounds like he has left some great things behind though in physical items and in your knowledge.
Thanks for sharing. The video looks great btw.

CtL

-- Chris L. "Don't Dream it, Be it."- PortablePastimes.com (Purveyors of Portable Fun and Fidgets)

View Toolz's profile

Toolz

1003 posts in 2429 days


#8 posted 04-23-2013 09:14 PM

My grandfather and grand uncle ran a machine shop in the mid ‘40s through the late’50s. They milled military grade ball bearings etc. for the War during WWII. Thanks for the links very interesting. Larry
P.S. My mom made self-sealing gas tanks for Navy dive bombers as a high school kid after school. ;-)

-- Larry "Work like a Captain but Play like a Pirate!"

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