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Project - Lever-Action Boxes #3: Carcase Assembly

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Blog entry by Dekker posted 2455 days ago 1135 reads 1 time favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Milling the lumber Part 3 of Project - Lever-Action Boxes series Part 4: Starting the Finishing »

Wow. I’ve had a busy weekend, but unfortunately I was not able to finish as much as I wanted.

Since I knew I was going to be using my router, I first fixed the problem I had with it.

I cut my stock to width and length, and I regret having cut the carcase pieces it to length. This made the next step, running it through the router, much trickier, since I had to use my push-pad to control a 3-1/2” long piece as it was getting a rabbet cut on it! It wanted to pull itself into the blade when it was not being supported by the fence. I guess I do need a zero-clearance insert on my fence.. (apologies to Snowdog).

This is the output from my routing. Things went OK, except I had some tearout on one of my short carcase ends.

Was that cut twice and measure once, or was it the other way around? This is what happens when you don’t read your own plans, and forget to deduct 1/4” for floating panels.

Carcase with top off, and on. – NO GLUE yet

Generous amount of glue, before being spread with toothbrush.

Here’s where my judgement lapsed… I forgot the “tape the joints together” trick, and so relied on clamps to assemble the carcase. I did not achieve the nice tight joints that my mitered ends deserved. Perhaps next time!

Repairing the tearout at the top (visible edge!) of a carcase end.

Carcases fully assembled, with one lid on, and the other lid upside down. Douglas Bordner and Cajunpen, the lever action is due to the rabbet along the end of the lid, as can be seen on the lid that is upside down. I forgot to take a photo of the lid in action, but when you press down on either end, the opposite end tilts up so you can remove the lid.

I wanted to put some miter keys into the joints, so I needed to fashion myself a sled to hold my box. This is my sled during the glue-up phase.

Though I have no pics from the end of the day, I left my project with birch (?) keys inserted and drying.

Now all that remains is to trim and sand the keys flush, sand the entire exterior (interior was done pre-assembly), and apply a finish. Does anyone have experience with finishing lacewood? Any suggestions, or is Danish Oil a good option? I’m looking for something that will give some depth to the lacewood’s natural figure.

-- Dekker - http://www.WoodworkDetails.com/



8 comments so far

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18614 posts in 2746 days


#1 posted 2455 days ago

excellent blog!
nice to see the steps involved

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Dekker's profile

Dekker

147 posts in 2466 days


#2 posted 2455 days ago

Thanks, MsDebbieP. Its also a good way to immortalize your mistakes for all to see ;P But at least this way the shame can be burned into my subconscious, and I won’t repeat the mistakes.

-- Dekker - http://www.WoodworkDetails.com/

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18614 posts in 2746 days


#3 posted 2455 days ago

AND it will help the rest of us – when we make the same mistake we can say “oh yah, Dekker told us about that” :)

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Blake's profile

Blake

3434 posts in 2460 days


#4 posted 2455 days ago

I have made boxes with lacewood. I find that Danish oil adds yellow or amber color to lighter woods, and tends to darken woods like lacewood. It also seems to take take out some of the contrast between the colors in the “lace.”

I like using boiled linseed oil much more. It as similar properties as the Danish, but it is clear. Just wipe on. One coat or more if you wish. It dries quickly if you want to wipe on another coat. It leaves the surface of the wood feeling and looking very natural, but will protect your work and give it a nice subtle shine. Wipe the two side by side on a few test scraps to see the difference.

I use boiled linseed oil for almost all of my projects when I want to leave the wood as natural as possible. I only use heavier varnishes when I need a high gloss. To give certain high-figure woods a glossy “wow factor” I love using General Finishes (green can). It is an excellent high quality finish which is very thin. This allows me to layer it on until it is just right. The “thin-ness” also makes it go on very smoothly, so no bubbles or drips in the final coat. I had a lot of frustration with other finishes before I found this stuff.

Have you made the keyed miters yet? I don’t know how big your box is, but for smaller boxes I think very thin keys looks elegant. Consider using one of these slot hinge blades...

Your box is coming along nicely.

-- Happy woodworking! http://www.openarmsphotography.com

View Dekker's profile

Dekker

147 posts in 2466 days


#5 posted 2455 days ago

Actually, I have three scraps on the go: Tung Oil, satin poly, and gloss poly. I will have to look into the General finish. Elsewhere, I found the following finishing schedule for lacewood: 3 coats General Finishes (clear), then 3 coats TopFin, with 0000 rubdown between each.

I already made the keys/miters. 1/8” slots, since I didn’t have that nifty router bit. I may have to do some shopping if I keep this up.

-- Dekker - http://www.WoodworkDetails.com/

View Blake's profile

Blake

3434 posts in 2460 days


#6 posted 2455 days ago

1/8” slots will look fine.

-- Happy woodworking! http://www.openarmsphotography.com

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2622 days


#7 posted 2452 days ago

This is a good blog, Dek. I like descriptions that involve mistakes and pitfalls. It’s the way the rest of us learn! Nice series.

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Dekker's profile

Dekker

147 posts in 2466 days


#8 posted 2452 days ago

Thanks Tom

If you like descriptions of mistakes and pitfalls, you’ve come to the right blog… I always find they are the best way to prevent repeats of past mistakes.

-- Dekker - http://www.WoodworkDetails.com/

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