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Restoring Hand Planes.. My methods #5: Tip on replacing Stanley Bailey plane parts

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Blog entry by Dan posted 02-13-2011 05:49 PM 9730 reads 1 time favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Sanding and Polishing the body and metal parts Part 5 of Restoring Hand Planes.. My methods series Part 6: Stanley Bailey #6 complete restore w pics! »

This is just a quick blog with a tip for other guys like me who like restoring old planes.

Sometimes you will run into a plane where you have a missing a small part such as a screw or bolt. You may also run into one where the part is stripped or damaged beyond repair. I see that there are a lot of people who sell these parts on ebay and sometimes the bidding price for the part is more then you paid for the plane.

I recently won an auction on ebay for a Wards Master plane. My bid winning bid was 0.99 cents. With shipping I only paid 11 dollars for the pnd lane. I was the only bidder and I assume its because its a Wards Master and not a Stanley. I got the plane and cleaned it up a bit and was surprised to see that it was almost an exact copy of the Stanley Bailey planes. The tote and knob bolts as well as the adjustment screw were both solid brass, identical to the brass hardware on the Stanley’s. The frog was the same type as the later Stanley models and was an identical match to my Stanley frog when I compared them.

I actually needed some of these small parts so I cleaned them up and put them on my Stanley planes. I checked ebay again and found another Wards Master plane again with a very very low price. I bid on it and won that one also. That one also had solid brass hardware and was a clone of the Stanley planes.

I could turn around and sell just the brass parts on ebay and get more for those then what I paid for the planes.

I thought I would share this. Rather then buying just the parts you need, it may be cheaper to buy a whole plane like this and then you can have all the parts. Or even just fix the plane up and use it. Its no different the the Bailey planes and would make a great user for a fraction of the price.

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"



7 comments so far

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

1831 posts in 1655 days


#1 posted 02-13-2011 07:13 PM

That a great concept , BUT, every time I found one for parts, I would think this just needs a knob or screw, so I would set it aside and look for another, then another ,then ?,well now I have many planes, some are complete and some are waiting for that “special piece”.lol

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1773 days


#2 posted 02-14-2011 12:27 AM

thankĀ“s for the tip Dan :-)

take care
Dennis

View Dave's profile

Dave

11168 posts in 1498 days


#3 posted 02-14-2011 04:12 AM

Great tip thx

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View Joe Watson's profile

Joe Watson

315 posts in 2204 days


#4 posted 02-14-2011 05:05 PM

there is a reason the plane looks like a copy of the stanley most likely it is a stanley. stanley made planes for wards sears and older hardware chains that no longer exist like keen kutter branded planes from EC Simmons. Really only 4 major brands that existed after 1900 Union, Stanley, Millers Falls, and Sargent. Stanley eventually bought Sargent and Union so sometimes a plane that resembles a union or sargent of a later date will be a stanley made plane. Millers Falls made economy planes for hardware chains as well. the brand Dunlop in most cases are Millers Falls planes. planes are addictive, I started just getting planes for use and wound up getting addicted to history of them.

-- Got Wood?

View swirt's profile

swirt

1945 posts in 1630 days


#5 posted 02-14-2011 05:21 PM

Great tip Dan, and thanks for the extra info Joe.

Canadian Chips is right on, I bought an old wooden fore plane that was busted out on the side and at the time I considered it unrepairable. I only paid $4 for it and I got ot for my son (1 yr old at the time) to play with as a toy. It was too big for my son so I cut the nose off it to make it lighter and get rid of the sharp protruding wood spears. Now I can’t tell you how many times I look at that plane think ohh all it needs is a little bit of…..X Y and Z and I could get it back up and running. It nags at me because it has the most comfortable tote of any plane I’ve held. I bought a saw once just for the saw nuts, and now I can’t bring myself to sacrifice it.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1351 days


#6 posted 02-14-2011 05:42 PM

You can also cut the off-brand blades down for molding plane blades, etc. There’s always something good in an old plane.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Brad's profile

Brad

860 posts in 1398 days


#7 posted 07-06-2012 04:44 PM

I’ve had good luck sourcing replacement Stanley plane parts from http://www.stjamesbaytoolco.com/. Home>Tools>stanley Reproduction Replacement Parts. I got a depth adjustment thumb screw to replace the crappy user-installed screw on my #78 among other parts.

I’m amazed by the selection of parts. And knowing that I can source a part helps me in bidding on Ebay. Gee, that plane would be great if it didn’t need X,Y and Z. But I could get those from St James for $x.00, so I should bid $y.00.

The advantage this approach has is that you don’t have a surplus of plane bodies littering the workshop. And best of all, you don’t feel guilty about canabalizing a vintage tool for parts.

-- "People's lives are their own rewards or punishments."

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