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Cutting Board Learning #2: Making Progress

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Blog entry by Davidramsey03 posted 2218 days ago 810 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: First Steps Part 2 of Cutting Board Learning series no next part

BEFORE I START, IF YOU READ THIS, AND CAN OFFER ADVICE, I’D LOVE TO HEAR IT. THANKS IN ADVANCE!!!!!

Ok, after collecting information from a couple key people, and looking carefully at my pieces, I’ve moved on to Sample #2.


First things first. NEW CLAMPS!!!!! Not the best, but all I could get for now.


On to business. More blanks, 10 this time.


For these, I used a sanding block and norton 3x sandpaper. This was slow, but quiet as it was about 9:00PM when I started, and I’m in my apartment. So, i made about 50-60 passes on each side with 60 grit, adding more to clear up deeper scratches, etc… then moved on to about 30 passes per side with 150, then onto about 15 with 220. They look nice and smooth on top. I spent about 10 minutes total per piece. Then I spent about 5-10 minutes carefully placing them side by side, seeing which fit the tightest together, and which looked good side-by-side. One ended up loking bad, so I did an extra one I had to make up for it.


Time for GLU!!! Titebond II, using a makeshift glue-brush (my index finger) spread the glue between each piece.


Then I clamped it down for about an hour.


Finally, unclamped, resanded top and sides at 60, 150, and 220 again, probably 10 passes each grit.

THE REST OF THE PICTURES ARE THE FINISHED PIECE WITH ONE COAT OF MINERAL OIL.
I let it soak for about an hour in mineral oil, then wiped it off for pictures. The first 4 below I used a flash so it would highlight all the colors in the grains. The last image is how it looks when you’re holding it.





The FINISHED (for now) piece!!! Took from 9:00AM-1:00AM, including going back and forth to this blog…

Please feel free to comment!! Thanks and I hope others are picking up things from my mistakes and learning difficulties. Enjoy!



9 comments so far

View moshel's profile

moshel

864 posts in 2309 days


#1 posted 2217 days ago

good job! you will greatly benefit from having pipe clamps (Pony). they are 10-15$ each and will last you a lifetime (you need two and some 3/4” pipes). they give you the best baseline for your cutting board (the pipes) and have very accurate pressure. if I were you, that would be my next purchase.

keep making them!

-- The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep...

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11644 posts in 2313 days


#2 posted 2217 days ago

Well now , isn’t that special : ) You’re going to be putting me out of business in no time at all : ) Great job considering your tool selection at the moment . Any luck with the bandsaw at work thoughts ? How much have the pen blanks cost you so far ?

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2273 days


#3 posted 2217 days ago

looking good.

let me start with the clamps – I think those are terrific clamps ! and not some sub-par quality clamps… I have the same and I love those, they are actually heavier duty then other clamps in the same range!

2 things:
1. I would recommend (hand/power) planing the pieces prior to glue up – this will give you a better looking joint, and a better/stronger joint
2. I would recommend (hand/power) planing the surfaces of the glued-up panel before you sand it – it’ll clean up those joint lines, and give you a more uniformed “single piece” look to the board, and reduce any gaps in between the pieces that make up for it.

keep up the good work ! and thanx for sharing.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Terry's profile

Terry

172 posts in 2258 days


#4 posted 2217 days ago

I agree with planing after glueup. If you are worried about snipe then glue sacrificial boards to the two outboard sides of your board. The sacrificial pieces must be longer than your board. Run this assembly through your planner. Any snipe will be in the longer sacrificial pieces. Cut them away on the table saw when you are done. I do this when I make end grain boards for smooth results.

View Davidramsey03's profile

Davidramsey03

8 posts in 2220 days


#5 posted 2217 days ago

Hey guys. Thanks for the tips…however, as of now, I don’t have a planer (hand or power) and I don’t have a table saw, or a band saw, or anything big as I’m working in an apartment. I have a jigsaw, circular saw, router, sheet sander, miter saw, and a drill. That’s about it….Call it “Powered Traditional woodworking”.... It looks like I may be in the market for a hand planer, huh?

View moshel's profile

moshel

864 posts in 2309 days


#6 posted 2217 days ago

you can use the router as a planer with a jig. however, this is not trivial. I still think that with pipe clamps, assuming that the blanks are all 100% alike, you will get much better results as you can get very level gluing.
decent #5 plane will also work wonders, but this is also a skill that has to be learned. the big bonus is that hand planes are quite and make no sawdust, which is very important in apartments. dont forget to lap and hone whatever plane you get, otherwise you will be discouraged by the result.

-- The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep...

View jeanmarc's profile

jeanmarc

1886 posts in 2341 days


#7 posted 2216 days ago

good job!

-- jeanmarc manosque france

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11644 posts in 2313 days


#8 posted 2210 days ago

Yo Bro , any progress to date ?

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View Davidramsey03's profile

Davidramsey03

8 posts in 2220 days


#9 posted 2209 days ago

@Dusty56: Waiting on permission to begin my #5 hand plane mission. Hopefully next week I can go look for one. Will definitely keep updating here when I’ve made progress. Thanks for checking!

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