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Used Mitre Saw Question

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Blog entry by David L posted 03-10-2010 03:46 AM 1011 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I just bought a used mitre saw (Delta 10” 36-075). Apparently it’s been sitting around for a while. When the blade arm goes up and down, it sounds like an old squeaky, creaky door. Also, when changing the mitre angle, it very, very hard to move. Any ideas on how to rememdy these? Thanks



8 comments so far

View dlmckirdy's profile

dlmckirdy

196 posts in 2593 days


#1 posted 03-10-2010 03:53 AM

WD40!

-- Doug, Bakersfield, CA - I measured twice, cut it twice, and it is still too short!

View cstrang's profile

cstrang

1829 posts in 2628 days


#2 posted 03-10-2010 04:04 AM

Don’t use WD40 on any tools, use a silicone lubricant. Dust will stick to WD40 and the problem will be worse than when it started.

-- A hammer dangling from a wall will bang and sound like work when the wind blows the right way.

View davidroberts's profile

davidroberts

1025 posts in 2946 days


#3 posted 03-10-2010 04:35 AM

if you use a silicone lube, be very careful not to get any on wood you want to finish, not paint, but finish. it will ruin your day. I’m not sure about teflon sprays. Frugal and surgical use of WD 40 is not a problem. A thin film of paste wax, where application is allowed, usually works well also.

-- Better woodworking through old hand tools.

View eccentrictinkerer's profile

eccentrictinkerer

38 posts in 2488 days


#4 posted 03-10-2010 05:20 AM

What ever you do, don’t use the saw untilit works perfectly!

My Makita 1220 12” a little slow on returning to the up position. I made a dumb move too fast and have a nice scar on the knuckles of my left hand.

A wonderful micro-surgeon re-attached some cut ligaments and i have full use of the hand.

I called Makita customer service and asked where the the adjustment was for the problem. I also told them about the accident. A supervisor got on the phone and told me to take the saw immediately to the service center.

When I got there, the manager came and made the adjustment himself. Talk about service! I probably could have received limo service if I’d asked!

View Abbott's profile

Abbott

2570 posts in 2763 days


#5 posted 03-10-2010 05:28 AM

I’ve been using WD40 on my tools (and firearms) for 30 years, it works great.

-- Ohh mann...pancakes and boobies...I'll bet that's what Heaven is like! ♣ ♣ ♣ ♣

View dlmckirdy's profile

dlmckirdy

196 posts in 2593 days


#6 posted 03-10-2010 07:44 AM

WD 40, used by flooding the stiff joint and working it, will float away the dust/corrosion that is causing the problem. After the joint is working properly, clean up the runnout with paint thinner. Don’t believe that the maunfacturer did not use some petroleum lubricant when the saw was new. If you want to disassemble the saw and clean all the parts thoroughly, then you might use a silicone or wax lubricant when you reassemble it. WD40 is actually blended to be a Water Dispersant. As such, it will protect the movable joint from moisture and future corrosion. As with any lubricant, keeping any runnout cleaned off the area surrounding the joint is critical to avoiding dust buildup.

When I was in the Army in Vietnam, my M-16 jammed and blew the receiver out in my face. I had been following the Army’s instruction about not using WD40, but rather using their issued lubricant, which attracted EVERYTHING. I used WD40 exclusively on the replacement weapon, and never had a problem with it.

-- Doug, Bakersfield, CA - I measured twice, cut it twice, and it is still too short!

View cstrang's profile

cstrang

1829 posts in 2628 days


#7 posted 03-10-2010 01:55 PM

Oops, I meant to say non-silicone lubricant, in some articles as well as at school and in industry they say what I said above; don’t use WD40 on woodworking tools, this is because WD40 is a great de-greaser but not a great long term lubricant, also it has been argued in numerous forum topics (here and abroad) that it is actually really bad to use WD40 because it attracts dust to what it has been coated with the product. We all have our personal opinions about the stuff, I am just speaking from my experience in my own shop as well as talking to some people in industry. Personally, I wouldn’t use it.

-- A hammer dangling from a wall will bang and sound like work when the wind blows the right way.

View Abbott's profile

Abbott

2570 posts in 2763 days


#8 posted 03-10-2010 05:06 PM

WD40 is not a long term lubricant but regular maintenance overcomes that limitation. It is not the only lubricant I use but it is the lubricant and cleaning agent I turn to most often. It is one of the best all around maintenance items a guy can have in the shop regardless of what the book or the Internet might say. I have never had a shop or garage that didn’t have a can or two.

WD-40 11 oz. @$4.99.

I also plan to give this product, T-9 a try for some applications.
4oz. @$8.49.

-- Ohh mann...pancakes and boobies...I'll bet that's what Heaven is like! ♣ ♣ ♣ ♣

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