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It's a Learning Process #1: My first dutchman

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Blog entry by Dave Rutan posted 10-19-2016 03:50 PM 1029 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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I got it in my head to try and make one of those bow tie shaped inlays which are sometimes called a dutchmen. Put simply, I have some learning to do.

[Above] I cut a bow tie from a piece of spalted, sanded it, and traced it’s outline onto a scrap piece of pine. One possible mistake is that I traced it with a scribe instead of a knife or pencil.

[Above] Then I clamped the piece to the bench and chiseled around the perimeter and chiseled around inside the lines to break up the wood. I removed the splinters and did my best to level out the cavity.

[Above] You can see the result is not exactly spectacular.

[Above] Doing the trick with glue and saw dust doesn’t work well in this instance either.

[Above] I tried with a piece of homegrown walnut on the flip side of the board. It may be a bit better, but not what I’d call up to snuff. I also found a video after this try that suggested very slightly tapering the edges of the bowtie so that as you insert the piece it wedges itself against the edges. I’ve yet to try that.

[Fun Fact:] The term for ‘Dutchman’ in Esperanto is ’lignoflikańĶo.’ (wood patch)

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!



8 comments so far

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2659 posts in 2241 days


#1 posted 10-19-2016 04:31 PM

Well, without trying this, you’d never know what your mistakes would be, so as to eliminate them. As the saying goes: practice, practice, practice.
Since you have the first try using glue and sawdust, stain the board to see if the boarder stands out unstained due to the glue.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

1715 posts in 2239 days


#2 posted 10-19-2016 05:09 PM



Well, without trying this, you d never know what your mistakes would be, so as to eliminate them. As the saying goes: practice, practice, practice.
Since you have the first try using glue and sawdust, stain the board to see if the boarder stands out unstained due to the glue.

- Oldtool

I’m very sure it would stand out, based on my past experiences. I suppose painting it would still be an option, though that’s a waste of the spalted and walnut patches.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

2419 posts in 949 days


#3 posted 10-19-2016 05:19 PM

Hey Dave,
Next time chisel the border about a 1/16th shy of your lines. Then hog out the center, then come back and chisel that last 1/16 off. It’s much easier to clean up to your lines without all the meat in the center.

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

1715 posts in 2239 days


#4 posted 10-19-2016 05:39 PM



Hey Dave,
Next time chisel the border about a 1/16th shy of your lines. Then hog out the center, then come back and chisel that last 1/16 off. It s much easier to clean up to your lines without all the meat in the center.

- jbay

I’ll have to remember that. Not many guys seem to do this without a router.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

5141 posts in 2254 days


#5 posted 10-19-2016 08:56 PM

Dave Good work on your first Dutchman.

and as a reward and encouragement I offer the following:-

I had a look at what you have been doing.
I then had a couple of reads as to what you where supposed to be doing so I could comment constructively.

So here we go, and I may have still gotten your intent wrong.

Dutchmen or Butterfly or bow ties are used in two possible senarios to my knowledge
Some are inlay as you have done and some can be as thick as the parent timber.

The big Boys
Are the Dutchmen, these are the guys or guy that poked their finger in a small hole in the dyke and saved the world so to speak.
they are the big boys and usually have the role of saving timber with a crack or check defect from getting wider. Crack and checks always get wider or bigger otherwise if it was the opposite they would close up and disappear forever, and we would have to do nothing at all. (then we would all be bored and not experiment like you)
They are usually fitted at 90 degrees to the grain and can be constrasting material to make them a feature.

The little Guys
Butterflies, petite as the name apples, or Bowties, (a small tie worn by shifty people) or doctors (read as anoither form of shiify people)

These have the role of again repairing defects but this time are usually grain and pattern matched to be almost invisible and are as you have made, only a minimal thickness. For example repairing veneer.
They do not have to be a fixed pattern either the edge can be a randon curved shape. I dont have the tool but there is a punch made especially for this work.

The punch.
Its the reverse cut of a conventional wad punch and has a random edge (like a biscuit cutter) which ensures a perfect fit for the veneer and parent material under repair.

I am betting Stefang, Shipwright or the Brit Box Guy has one in their tool collection.
Stefang or Mike is currently feeling a bit poorly so you may not hear from him just yet, but I tiping other LJs will spot your post and add some more correct competency based info for you to read and then go do more practice on.

The only way you are going to reach perfection in your work is practice (Oldtool) there is no real short cut apart from a little brass inlay tool but is for use with a router.

Plus as you have discovered there is no sawduct and glue repairs they are a definate no no it only highlights the error, (redo the work again is the only craftsman fix)

Enough waffle.

-- Regards Rob

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

6657 posts in 3198 days


#6 posted 10-19-2016 10:42 PM

Looks like you’re off to a good start!

Here are a few things I’ve learned along the way:

Trace around the Dutchman with a marking knife.

Use a trim router to hog out most of the waste, getting very close to the line without touching it.

Use a chisel to remove the remaining waste—but starting away from the line, and working your way up to it. (If you start on the scribe line, you’ll bruise the wood fibers on the backside of the chisel, and push them away from the scribe line. Working your way up to the line avoids this—and avoids a loose-fitting Dutchman.)

Fine Woodworking Magazine (Oct. ‘16, #256, Pg. 24,) has a nice article about this process. You should be able to check it out from your local library.

-- Dean -- "Don't give up the ship -- fight her 'till she sinks!" Capt James Lawrence USN

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

1715 posts in 2239 days


#7 posted 10-20-2016 12:53 AM



Dave Good work on your first Dutchman.

and as a reward and encouragement I offer the following:-

I had a look at what you have been doing.
I then had a couple of reads as to what you where supposed to be doing so I could comment constructively.

So here we go, and I may have still gotten your intent wrong.

Dutchmen or Butterfly or bow ties are used in two possible senarios to my knowledge
Some are inlay as you have done and some can be as thick as the parent timber.

The big Boys
Are the Dutchmen, these are the guys or guy that poked their finger in a small hole in the dyke and saved the world so to speak.
they are the big boys and usually have the role of saving timber with a crack or check defect from getting wider. Crack and checks always get wider or bigger otherwise if it was the opposite they would close up and disappear forever, and we would have to do nothing at all. (then we would all be bored and not experiment like you)
They are usually fitted at 90 degrees to the grain and can be constrasting material to make them a feature.

The little Guys
Butterflies, petite as the name apples, or Bowties, (a small tie worn by shifty people) or doctors (read as anoither form of shiify people)

These have the role of again repairing defects but this time are usually grain and pattern matched to be almost invisible and are as you have made, only a minimal thickness. For example repairing veneer.
They do not have to be a fixed pattern either the edge can be a randon curved shape. I dont have the tool but there is a punch made especially for this work.

The punch.
Its the reverse cut of a conventional wad punch and has a random edge (like a biscuit cutter) which ensures a perfect fit for the veneer and parent material under repair.

I am betting Stefang, Shipwright or the Brit Box Guy has one in their tool collection.
Stefang or Mike is currently feeling a bit poorly so you may not hear from him just yet, but I tiping other LJs will spot your post and add some more correct competency based info for you to read and then go do more practice on.

The only way you are going to reach perfection in your work is practice (Oldtool) there is no real short cut apart from a little brass inlay tool but is for use with a router.

Plus as you have discovered there is no sawduct and glue repairs they are a definate no no it only highlights the error, (redo the work again is the only craftsman fix)

Enough waffle.

- robscastle

Wow! A lot of info there. I’ll take this to heart. On the ‘little guys’ as long as it wasn’t a line of nail holes or something similar, I bet a Forstner bit and matching plug cutter would work okay.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

1715 posts in 2239 days


#8 posted 10-20-2016 12:54 AM



Looks like you re off to a good start!

Here are a few things I ve learned along the way:

Trace around the Dutchman with a marking knife.

Use a trim router to hog out most of the waste, getting very close to the line without touching it.

Use a chisel to remove the remaining waste—but starting away from the line, and working your way up to it. (If you start on the scribe line, you ll bruise the wood fibers on the backside of the chisel, and push them away from the scribe line. Working your way up to the line avoids this—and avoids a loose-fitting Dutchman.)

Fine Woodworking Magazine (Oct. 16, #256, Pg. 24,) has a nice article about this process. You should be able to check it out from your local library.

- Mean_Dean

I’ll see about looking up that article. Thanks!

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

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