LumberJocks

Dave's Workshop #14: T-Wrench Handle

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Dave Rutan posted 01-25-2016 01:31 AM 704 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 13: I'm Getting a Scroll Saw! Part 14 of Dave's Workshop series Part 15: I improved my tapering jig »

“Necessity is the mother of invention” as the old saw goes. When I was researching the scroll saw that I got, I found that the special T-wrench was missing. So I looked it up and found that it is metric and 3.5mm. 3.5mm is not really a standard size as I found. They aren’t included in sets of hex wrenches and to buy a T-wrench of that kind would cost more than I’m willing to spend.

Then I just looked online for a normal Allen key that was 3.5mm and found that while not pricey were still a bit more than ones found in sets.

Today I was just about to click the ‘buy’ button on one of these on eBay because the description said it was about 4 inches long (And thus could put it in my own handle if I wished.) It occurred to me that I should look in my jar of miscellaneous hex wrenches first.

I had not one, but two 3.5mm hex wrenches and they were longer than normal, 4 inches. I double checked that they fit the required screw on my scroll saw and they were perfect.

So I grabbed a scrap chunk of oak from my hardwood scrap bin. (Yes I have one of those now!) Then I cut it to approximate size on the table saw, drilled a hole on the center and used the drill press to do most of the work of creating a mortise for the L part of the wrench. I had to clean it up with a small chisel.

Then I ran that part of the handle over the Table saw to create a dado big enough to accept a piece of bamboo skewer. I inserted the wrench, glued in the skewer piece and let the glue dry.

It’s possible I should have used epoxy because the wrench rocks a bit, but I don’t mind.

After the glue set up, I planed the skewer flush with the top of the handle and narrowed and shaped the handle. Then I sanded it and coated it with boiled linseed oil.

Much cheaper than buying one and it has fancy bamboo inlay!

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!



7 comments so far

View TheWoodRaccoon's profile

TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 391 days


#1 posted 01-25-2016 01:42 AM

That’s clever! Nice work!

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4211 posts in 1660 days


#2 posted 01-25-2016 05:47 AM

What saw you got Dave? I had the same problem when I purchased mine… it was missing the wrench, the clamp lock pin as well as the throat plate – so I made my own.

I did a similar design – drill the hole and then used a dremel to cut out the slot for the wrench tail to fit in… after inserting the wrench, I just filled the slot up with epoxy which then got sanded smooth after curing and then the whole thing got wrapped with some tape to make it a bit easier on the hands. The picture shows my second version. The first version was the same design, but I used glue instead of epoxy, which didn’t hold up well and eventually worked it’s way loose. It takes quite a bit of torque with use, so it needs to be held in pretty snug. The lock pin I made was just an appropriate sized chop stick glued into a hardwood block, and the throat plate was made using recycled laundry detergent bottles (HDPE).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

1430 posts in 1650 days


#3 posted 01-25-2016 11:14 AM

It’s a Dremel 1672. I had to locate and buy the pinless blade adapters for it. I don’t yet have any pinless blades, but I figure I will some day. The only other thing I might look for is the quick change adapter.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

8738 posts in 1301 days


#4 posted 01-25-2016 01:15 PM

Nicely made tool, Dave!

-- God bless, Candy

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2373 posts in 1652 days


#5 posted 01-25-2016 01:40 PM

The making of this tool is a prime example of why woodworking is no popular, it provides the opportunity to be creative while exercising our problem solving skills.
This example also proves you really do need to hoard all those projects cutoffs, because you’ll never know when one will come in handy, no matter how small.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View TheWoodRaccoon's profile

TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 391 days


#6 posted 01-25-2016 02:04 PM



The making of this tool is a prime example of why woodworking is no popular….

- Oldtool

Don’t you mean “So” popular? :p

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

View TheWoodRaccoon's profile

TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 391 days


#7 posted 01-25-2016 02:07 PM



What saw you got Dave? I had the same problem when I purchased mine… it was missing the wrench, the clamp lock pin as well as the throat plate – so I made my own.

I did a similar design – drill the hole and then used a dremel to cut out the slot for the wrench tail to fit in… after inserting the wrench, I just filled the slot up with epoxy which then got sanded smooth after curing and then the whole thing got wrapped with some tape to make it a bit easier on the hands. The picture shows my second version. The first version was the same design, but I used glue instead of epoxy, which didn t hold up well and eventually worked it s way loose. It takes quite a bit of torque with use, so it needs to be held in pretty snug. The lock pin I made was just an appropriate sized chop stick glued into a hardwood block, and the throat plate was made using recycled laundry detergent bottles (HDPE).

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

That’s interesting! I’ve dabbled in HDPE melting, but only for making slingshots. I make plates as thick as 1 inch. How thick is that insert plate? I would think it has to be at least 1/4 inch to prevent deflection.

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com