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Hints and Tips #14: KISS System Dust Collector

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Blog entry by Dave Rutan posted 10-02-2015 05:07 PM 1187 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 13: Spalted Log Breakdown Part 14 of Hints and Tips series Part 15: Another Way to Break Down a Log »

I don’t like the idea of breathing in dust while running my machinery any more than the next guy (er, woodworker.) A few years ago, when we finally stopped using our last box fan, I hid it away, having an idea to re-purpose it down the road. So a few weeks ago, I decided to take another step towards a safer shop. I dug out the fan and cleaned it up. After checking that it still ran OK, I went out and bought one of those filters for forced hot air heating systems and installed it on the ‘sucking’ side of the box fan. This particular filter, 20×20 inch in my case is disposable, but I plan on investing in one that can be cleaned and reused (up to ten years according to the product info!)

The filter is simply taped onto the frame of the fan with duct tape. When upgrade, I might make a proper wooden frame to ease the removal of the filter for cleaning. In any case, I have noticed a difference in the air quality of my shop after doing dust-making operations. I’ve also noticed less need to dust things off that aren’t even my tools.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!



6 comments so far

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2375 posts in 1658 days


#1 posted 10-02-2015 05:21 PM

Nice repurposing of the fan, should serve you well in the new application.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View CharlieK's profile

CharlieK

467 posts in 3261 days


#2 posted 10-02-2015 05:36 PM

Way to go, Dave. None of us want to have COPD later in life.

-- Adjustable Height Workbench Plans http://www.Jack-Bench.com

View NDakota's profile

NDakota

68 posts in 1014 days


#3 posted 10-02-2015 07:11 PM

I made one like that a few years ago. What i found was that a filter on the outflow side catches a lot of dust also.I offset the filters top and bottom about 3inches so the motor didnt have to work as hard, dont know if that is neccesary!? I also found that a old cheap filter works better than expensive one,I just vacume when dirty

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

1435 posts in 1656 days


#4 posted 10-02-2015 07:24 PM

I’ll say this, I was breaking down a few small logs this morning. I was wearing a dust mask because I’m getting cautious. When I took off the dust mask it was covered with dust. I’ll take any help I can g


I made one like that a few years ago. What i found was that a filter on the outflow side catches a lot of dust also.I offset the filters top and bottom about 3inches so the motor didnt have to work as hard, dont know if that is neccesary!? I also found that a old cheap filter works better than expensive one,I just vacume when dirty

- NDakota

I was going to try vacuuming the filter first. I’m glad that it should work. Low budget make us all inventive.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3393 posts in 1672 days


#5 posted 10-05-2015 06:14 AM

Hey Dave,

Dont vacuum the filter it will possibly then just block up the wifes vac, take it outside and gently tap it on a bin or the likes, as the dust will be very fine, it dosent all need to come out of the filter as its a filter and needs a certain amount of dust to work really well.

-- Regards Robert

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

1435 posts in 1656 days


#6 posted 10-05-2015 10:01 AM

I was figuring on that or just brushing it with my generous shop brush. I would think vacuuming mine would just suck the baffles out of the frame.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

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