LumberJocks

“Roman” saw

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Dave Rutan posted 08-10-2018 08:44 PM 793 reads 0 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I started making this about a year ago, but just finished it this week. It is my version of a Roman Empire era hand saw. I made the blade from flat steel from the hardware store and cut the teeth with a triangular file. The handle is maple treated with flame and the ferrule is copper with a brass rivet. I finished it with linseed oil.

I’m amazed at how well it cuts. It’s very aggressive.

I rusted the blade to give it an ancient artifact look.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!



15 comments so far

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

3656 posts in 734 days


#1 posted 08-10-2018 09:17 PM

That’s very cool, Dave. You should stamp something like 57 BC on it and see how many people you can trick.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

164 posts in 1437 days


#2 posted 08-10-2018 09:24 PM

Looks like a fun project. Do you know how the Romans cut the teeth in their saws?

-- James E McIntyre

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

1733 posts in 2333 days


#3 posted 08-10-2018 10:22 PM



That s very cool, Dave. You should stamp something like 57 BC on it and see how many people you can trick.

- Rich

Ha! Even better. I could stamp it in Roman numerals to boot! (LVII B.C.)

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

1733 posts in 2333 days


#4 posted 08-10-2018 10:27 PM


Looks like a fun project. Do you know how the Romans cut the teeth in their saws?

- James E McIntyre

Apparently the Romans had files, as did the Egyptians (though made of bronze instead of iron) I can’t imagine how the ‘first’ file came about though.

It’s interesting that up until the Industrial Revolution carpenter’s tools stayed pretty much the same except for the quality of metal.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12369 posts in 2525 days


#5 posted 08-10-2018 11:45 PM

Build a Roman work bench and build a Roman seat. Cool project Dave.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View sval229's profile

sval229

78 posts in 3687 days


#6 posted 08-11-2018 12:26 AM

Can’t stamp 57 BC because BC is “before Christ”. How would they know he was coming? Wonder what the date was called then?

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

3656 posts in 734 days


#7 posted 08-11-2018 12:34 AM


Can t stamp 57 BC because BC is “before Christ”. How would they know he was coming? Wonder what the date was called then?

- sval229

That was the joke. It’s an old brain teaser I remember from fifth grade. An archeologist says he found a coin stamped 57 BC. How do you know he’s lying?

What did they call the years then? I’m pretty sure it was like 3000 A.T. which would be anno tuttum, or in the year of King Tut.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

1733 posts in 2333 days


#8 posted 08-11-2018 12:57 AM



Build a Roman work bench and build a Roman seat. Cool project Dave.

- Woodknack

I don’t know about the workbench, but I may try making an Iron Age plane at some point.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View NormG's profile

NormG

6252 posts in 3148 days


#9 posted 08-11-2018 12:58 AM

Great tool, thank yo for sharing

-- Norman - I never never make a mistake, I just change the design.

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

1733 posts in 2333 days


#10 posted 08-11-2018 12:59 AM



Can t stamp 57 BC because BC is “before Christ”. How would they know he was coming? Wonder what the date was called then?

- sval229

Can’t say for sure, but I think the Romans just put the image of the current emperor on their coins. Not sure about anyone else at the moment.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

1733 posts in 2333 days


#11 posted 08-11-2018 02:14 AM



Looks like a fun project. Do you know how the Romans cut the teeth in their saws?

- James E McIntyre

I think that when I cut the teeth, I started with a cold chisel. This seems to have widened the kerf at the teeth. I’ve cut a few small pieces of wood with this saw today and it hasn’t gotten bound up. Not ready to trade out my table saw yet.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View JADobson's profile

JADobson

1205 posts in 2256 days


#12 posted 08-14-2018 02:50 PM

Can t stamp 57 BC because BC is “before Christ”. How would they know he was coming? Wonder what the date was called then?

- sval229

Can t say for sure, but I think the Romans just put the image of the current emperor on their coins. Not sure about anyone else at the moment.

- Dave Rutan

I knew that history degree would come in handy one day. Roman’s mostly just used months and the years of an emperor’s reign but they did have the AUC system -Ab Urbe Condita meaning ‘from the founding of the city’ i.e. Rome. 1 AD = 754 AUC. But that wouldn’t be stamped on a coin.

Oh yeah, cool saw. Love projects like this. There is a cradle found at Herculaneum (destroyed by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius) that I would really like to reproduce.

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

1733 posts in 2333 days


#13 posted 08-14-2018 03:28 PM


Can t stamp 57 BC because BC is “before Christ”. How would they know he was coming? Wonder what the date was called then?

- sval229

Can t say for sure, but I think the Romans just put the image of the current emperor on their coins. Not sure about anyone else at the moment.

- Dave Rutan

I knew that history degree would come in handy one day. Roman s mostly just used months and the years of an emperor s reign but they did have the AUC system -Ab Urbe Condita meaning from the founding of the city i.e. Rome. 1 AD = 754 AUC. But that wouldn t be stamped on a coin.

Oh yeah, cool saw. Love projects like this. There is a cradle found at Herculaneum (destroyed by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius) that I would really like to reproduce.

- JADobson

The distaster in Pompeii and Herculaneum did historians a great service, basically freezing two Roman towns in time. In a Doctor Who episode, he rescues one family from the eruption and tells them that they will never be forgotten (at least not permanently.)

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View JADobson's profile

JADobson

1205 posts in 2256 days


#14 posted 08-14-2018 03:37 PM

Allons-y Alonso!

(different episode, maybe even a different Dr., but my favourite Dr Who-ism)

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

1733 posts in 2333 days


#15 posted 08-14-2018 04:15 PM



Allons-y Alonso!

(different episode, maybe even a different Dr., but my favourite Dr Who-ism)

- JADobson

Correct Doctor, but he definitely doesn’t say that in the ep. I recommend looking the ep up. Fires of Pompeii. It’s one of the first eps with Donna, and it’s great!

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com