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Video Woodworkers I Watch #19: Are there any left? (rant)

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Blog entry by Dave Rutan posted 03-21-2018 06:47 PM 3788 reads 5 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 18: Peter Brown Part 19 of Video Woodworkers I Watch series no next part

Lately I’ve been paring down the YouTube woodworks that I regularly watch. It seems that many of the ones I enjoyed have either decided to showcase their CNC’s, go into blacksmithing, go long format, or just vlog instead of build projects. Some have realized that you can’t get rich doing videos and have pretty much given up.

The few that I watch with any loyalty are Steve Ramsey (when he pits out a project video), Matthias Wandel and mostly John Heisz. I like John’s no-nonsense attitude, even when he vlogs. He reminds me of ‘scruffy’ Steve Ramsey in the early days.

-- Ni faru ion el ligno!



8 comments so far

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2718 posts in 2311 days


#1 posted 03-21-2018 07:26 PM

I agree with your assessment Dave, those I used to watch for knowledge in woodworking techniques now have moved on to other formats (vlogs as you mention) or completely stopped posting all together. Truth be known, there is only so much new material to be presented without repeating that which has been done. Maybe some have become tired of attempting to come up with new material on a regular basis.

I’ve noticed too that woodworking magazines are in a similar rut, and as a long time suscriber to many of these magazines, I’ve noticed the articles have been repeating prior material over and over again. In fact, some of them award prizes to subscribers that send in published “tips and tricks”, and I’ve found this awarded material in prior magazines from several years ago. Like I said, nothing new here. In an earlier post where I provide links to on-line free public domain woodworking books, you can find 18th, 19th, and early 20th century books with the same material.

Well, I suppose the novelty of being able to post videos on line has worn off too, just like anything new, once it has been experienced for a time, it becomes the same old – same old.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

1732 posts in 2309 days


#2 posted 03-21-2018 08:42 PM

When we first got in the house we subscribed to a gardening magazine for a few years, possibly 5 years. Same deal where they recycle the same (hardly updated) material each season. I guess there’s a point where we learned enough (except for finishes) and can just make something. Maybe the only place left is to go uber fancy, but that doesn’t interest me so much.


I agree with your assessment Dave, those I used to watch for knowledge in woodworking techniques now have moved on to other formats (vlogs as you mention) or completely stopped posting all together. Truth be known, there is only so much new material to be presented without repeating that which has been done. Maybe some have become tired of attempting to come up with new material on a regular basis.

I ve noticed too that woodworking magazines are in a similar rut, and as a long time suscriber to many of these magazines, I ve noticed the articles have been repeating prior material over and over again. In fact, some of them award prizes to subscribers that send in published “tips and tricks”, and I ve found this awarded material in prior magazines from several years ago. Like I said, nothing new here. In an earlier post where I provide links to on-line free public domain woodworking books, you can find 18th, 19th, and early 20th century books with the same material.

Well, I suppose the novelty of being able to post videos on line has worn off too, just like anything new, once it has been experienced for a time, it becomes the same old – same old.

- Oldtool


-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1250 posts in 1834 days


#3 posted 03-21-2018 09:41 PM

Guess that there is also a natural curve in peoples lives: Start a Youtube project, get to know it, grow it, feel a bit bored, move on to the next thing.
In my experience there are loads of great content being made in woodworking, especially if you look a bit beyond the US. My interest is mainly modern furniture and general making/designing/engineering. Here a list of my favorite ww’ers/makers, all doing high quality work, hope that you find something inspiring:

50point4 Squares
Adrian Preda
Andy Rawls
Ayd Design Co.
BearKat Wood (member here on LJ)
Bellevue Woodshop (Norway)
Ben Prowell
Blake Weber
Boris Beaulant (France)
Brian Oltrogge
Brian Robertson Woodworking
Cactus! workshop (Spain)
Chris Salomone
Clickspring (Au)
Cosmas Bauer (germany)
danbi work shop (Korea)
Dorian Bracht (Germany)
FinnCrafted (Finland)
foureyes
François Chalopin (Poland)
Geeks Wood Shop
Get Hands Dirty (Portugal)
GuysWoodshop
ISHITANI FURNITURE (Japan)
Jay Bates – Woodworking Videos
Jeremy Schmidt
Jurre Mattheeuwse (Nedelands)
Justin Depew
KingPost TimberWorks (Au)
Kirby Meets Audio
krtwood
Kyle Toth
Laura Kampf (Germany)
Marius Hornberger (Germany)
Matthew Helms
Matthias Burger (Germany)
Maurice Blok (Finland)
MBT Handmade
McCauley’s Design
Measured Workshop
Mike Farrington
Mr. Chickadee
Nick Accardi
Paoson WoodWorking (Spain)
Pask Makes (Au)
Paul Jenkins (Au)
Robin Lewis
RowanTaylor
Saltwood Designs
Samuel Mamias (France)
Shaun Boyd
Simon Heslop (Uk)
Steven Zhang (Au)
TAGwoodworking
The Minimalist Maker
TheArtisanWoodshop
Thomas Anton Geurts (Nederlands)
Thomas Johnson Antique Furniture Restoration
Timothy Wilmots (Nederlands)
Torbjörn Åhman (Sweden)
treebangham
Trevor’s Workshop
Vipul Fine Furniture
Wesley Treat, Maker of Things
Wintergatan (Sweden)
Wood U Make It
Woodworking Barcelona (Spain)
Works by Solo
김현규 (Korea)

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View Rich's profile

Rich

3549 posts in 710 days


#4 posted 03-21-2018 10:45 PM

I enjoy Thomas Johnson Antique Restoration videos. They might not be for everyone, but restoration and repair is an area I’m involved in, and he is a very talented guy and shows his work in a very clear fashion. He seems to be tapering off lately, but there are about 150 videos on youtube. I recommend starting with some of his earlier videos. His black lab is adorable as well.

A new one I’ve found is Philip Morley Furniture. He doesn’t have a huge library yet, but the videos that are there are generally informative and of good quality. His seven-part series on building Krenov style sawhorses is excellent. He’s a product of a London trade school and has apprenticed under two furniture makers and his workflow and attention to detail is very educational. Even if you already know how to do what he’s showing, you can learn something from watching him do it.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12341 posts in 2501 days


#5 posted 03-21-2018 11:09 PM

The adapocalypse opened many eyes that youtube was not such a sure thing. And then the most successful channels are kids vlogging, very low effort compared to project videos. YouTube woodworkers were high caliber when it came to editing, storyline, lighting, and sound; and they realized it wasn’t paying off. Then youtube demonetized the small guys. Most real furniture makers are too busy making furniture to make videos but you can find a lot of them on Instagram.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7139 posts in 3489 days


#6 posted 03-21-2018 11:34 PM

I agree with above and waiting for a new cycle of good videos if that ever comes!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Dave Rutan's profile

Dave Rutan

1732 posts in 2309 days


#7 posted 03-22-2018 12:42 AM

Why do you suppose Thomas Johnson has started saying ‘and… gor…met’ instead of ‘and gormet’?


I enjoy Thomas Johnson Antique Restoration videos. They might not be for everyone, but restoration and repair is an area I m involved in, and he is a very talented guy and shows his work in a very clear fashion. He seems to be tapering off lately, but there are about 150 videos on youtube. I recommend starting with some of his earlier videos. His black lab is adorable as well.

A new one I ve found is Philip Morley Furniture. He doesn t have a huge library yet, but the videos that are there are generally informative and of good quality. His seven-part series on building Krenov style sawhorses is excellent. He s a product of a London trade school and has apprenticed under two furniture makers and his workflow and attention to detail is very educational. Even if you already know how to do what he s showing, you can learn something from watching him do it.

- Rich


-- Ni faru ion el ligno!

View Rich's profile

Rich

3549 posts in 710 days


#8 posted 03-22-2018 01:19 AM


Why do you suppose Thomas Johnson has started saying and… gor…met instead of and gormet ?

- Dave Rutan

I haven’t noticed that. I’ll have to check it out. The main thing he’s well known for saying at the end of the videos is that the repair looks “pretty good.” In his latest where he repairs the harp, he says it looks really good, then catches himself and says pretty good.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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