LumberJocks

Diy rip tenon saw

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Daniel Solowiej posted 04-06-2017 10:55 PM 943 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Exclusively with hand tools, I made this rip tenon saw, using the blade of a cheap back saw, but that had a good steel.

It took me about 5 hours to make the slot in the brass by hand, but it was worth the effort.
Using the turning saw for the handle was a real pleasure, that kind of saw is wonderful and very fast.

If you can, make one, you will enjoy it like me!. I use it with a band saw blade cutout. You can see the two videos I did about it :)

Cutting the steel with the proper scissors is really easy and possible. No residue, no heating and no noise. The surplus of that cut, will be blades for a scratch stock.
In the video, I’m also sharing with you, an old, inexpensive and very efficient method to temporarily hold “difficult” or “fragile” wood, for the purpose of carving or filing. I have learned it from master carvers dedicated to ornaments for churches, and consists of gluing at least two sheets of paper using common but very watery white glue. It provides a solid temporary fixture to work, and easily peels off. Obviously care must be taken when levering the piece off !

Here the specifications of my saw:

Rip Tenon Saw
12” x 4” x 0.25” blade
¾” x ¼” solid brass back
3-1/4”” depth of cut
10 tpi – 11 ppi
Progresive rake configuration
0º fleam (90º to blade)
0º slope (90º to blade)
1.10 pounds
The wooden handle is of hard “Anchico” (Parapiptadenia rigida)
(The same wood that I use in the videos of my shop stool)

Maybe you want to see the video that shows how I did it:
https://youtu.be/afB9G1zArpM

Hope you like it ! Cheers

-- Daniel Solowiej, Argentina, https://www.youtube.com/user/danielsolowiej



8 comments so far

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2467 posts in 1941 days


#1 posted 04-06-2017 11:52 PM

Nice work, great looking saw. How did you get the back to fit tight on the blade, it looked a little loose in the video?
Great hacksaw work on the brass stock too, straight down the middle. My hacksaw cutting would have made the entire brass bar scrap.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Daniel Solowiej's profile

Daniel Solowiej

78 posts in 190 days


#2 posted 04-07-2017 11:21 AM



Nice work, great looking saw. How did you get the back to fit tight on the blade, it looked a little loose in the video?
Great hacksaw work on the brass stock too, straight down the middle. My hacksaw cutting would have made the entire brass bar scrap.

- Oldtool


Thanks so much !
Sure, the brass back came loose on the blade, but not too much, because before I had crushed the saw’s teeth. This was known in advance. The possible solutions were: hammering the brass, pressing with the vise the brass, or filling the excess space after inserting the blade.
I decided to opt for the last option. For this, I first sprinkle some baking soda into the space (with the blade in position and aligned) and then put cyanoacrylate glue. Both components on contact, react immediately, forming a very strong bond.
The work of the saw over the brass was difficult and lasted about five hours. I cut the ends first, to secure the center and the 90 ° using the hack saw. Then I made a cut up to join them. Finally I changed to the back saw, for which I had disarmed, and worked with the flattened teeth using oil and removing the chips constantly. It is easier to maintain this second saw aligned, using the cuts of the ends, and thanks to the measurement of its blade. But it is also harder to cut with it.
Thank you very much for commenting and interested in asking.

-- Daniel Solowiej, Argentina, https://www.youtube.com/user/danielsolowiej

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1523 posts in 398 days


#3 posted 04-07-2017 11:56 AM

Great looking saw. Good job! Did you use the existing holes to attach the handle, or did you bore new holes. If so what bit(s) did you use? I am having a great deal of trouble boring holes in a saw plate!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Daniel Solowiej's profile

Daniel Solowiej

78 posts in 190 days


#4 posted 04-07-2017 12:13 PM



Great looking saw. Good job! Did you use the existing holes to attach the handle, or did you bore new holes. If so what bit(s) did you use? I am having a great deal of trouble boring holes in a saw plate!

- Ron Aylor


Thank you for your comment and question! I used the same holes to avoid that problem, and I adapted the design of the handle to use them. I know there are special bits for hard metals. I have also been told that the secret to drilling, using common bits, is to use very low speed and more pushing force, although it will have to be sharpened repeatedly. I hope it has helped you in something. Thank you so much!

-- Daniel Solowiej, Argentina, https://www.youtube.com/user/danielsolowiej

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1523 posts in 398 days


#5 posted 04-07-2017 12:17 PM

Thanks for you reply, Daniel. I’ll keep trying!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Daniel Solowiej's profile

Daniel Solowiej

78 posts in 190 days


#6 posted 04-07-2017 12:40 PM



Thanks for you reply, Daniel. I ll keep trying!

- Ron Aylor


Thanks to you!

-- Daniel Solowiej, Argentina, https://www.youtube.com/user/danielsolowiej

View r33tc0w's profile

r33tc0w

140 posts in 235 days


#7 posted 04-10-2017 03:09 AM

Very well done! What brand saw files did you use?

-- Matthew 13:53-58

View Daniel Solowiej's profile

Daniel Solowiej

78 posts in 190 days


#8 posted 04-10-2017 11:05 AM



Very well done! What brand saw files did you use?

- r33tc0w


Thanks so much !
I ignore it, because I buy them at a flea market and they are not sealed.

-- Daniel Solowiej, Argentina, https://www.youtube.com/user/danielsolowiej

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com