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Summer Breeze Sailboat #5: Maiden Voyage

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Blog entry by Dan Lyke posted 752 days ago 2216 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Rigging test fit Part 5 of Summer Breeze Sailboat series no next part

And at some point you take a deep breath and say “I’ve figured out everything I can on dry land”.

The sail needs a lot of reconfiguration. We eventually got something that worked better than in this picture, although it’s got quite a weather helm in that setup. I think we’ll end up going to a fairly traditional lateen rig shortly.

The sloped transom makes the rudder funky, I’ll probably build something to put the rudder gudgeons in a more vertical line, and I think I need a better rudder pintel system than ¼-20 bolts with nylon lockwasher’s on ‘em.

But as a way to spend a pleasant afternoon on a lake, watching the heron feed and the geese paddle around followed by their little ones? Yeah, kinda hard to beat.

Construction started: Memorial Day weekend. 4 weeks later we’re sailing. There’s lots I’ll do different next time, but I’m kinda pleased.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke



8 comments so far

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1276 posts in 1581 days


#1 posted 752 days ago

Take a look at Michael Storer's website. He has a lot of good information on rigging a lugsail.

You need a lot more downhaul.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View Dan Lyke's profile

Dan Lyke

1464 posts in 2708 days


#2 posted 751 days ago

Thanks! He’s got a lot of good stuff there! Yeah, after reading through some of that, if we stay with the lug sail I think I’m going to need mechanical advantage on the downhaul.

My personal blog entry on yesterday has an embedded map, or you can view the track on Google Maps, in which you can see that we had one burst of wind in which we were doing over 6 MPH, so apparently she planes fairly nicely. We thought that lake was going to be perfect size, but now I want to head up and explore Lake Sonoma, and probably Richardson Bay down off Sausalito, and maybe Tomales Bay…

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

View Dan Lyke's profile

Dan Lyke

1464 posts in 2708 days


#3 posted 751 days ago

Oh, also realized: Redwood spars may not be stiff enough to take the sort of downhaul pressure that the lugsail needs… I may have to move beyond redwood 2×2s.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1276 posts in 1581 days


#4 posted 751 days ago

How big is the sail?

You might could just beef it up with a bit of glass.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View jack1's profile

jack1

1907 posts in 2610 days


#5 posted 751 days ago

neat

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

View Dan Lyke's profile

Dan Lyke

1464 posts in 2708 days


#6 posted 751 days ago

The upper spar is about 11’ long, the boom is 8’, the overall mast height is 10’. Right now the mast is a 2×6 cut semi-diagonally, glued back together reversed, and then turned on the router lathe. This has the advantage of distributing the knots. The other spars are just 2×2 con heart redwood planed mostly round. If I took two pieces of 1-by and put a layer of epoxy and glass in between them, cut that resulting 2-by into 1×2 strips, and glassed those together, I’d have knots well distributed with a cross of fiberglass in the center, which would get me a relatively cheap light wood that looks awesome with a glass core.

Or I could break down and buy ash or spruce or somesuch, or just spring for some aluminum or fiberglass structural tubing, but what fun is that?

Rigging-wise, I think I need to do a few things: Shorten the sail by about a foot. In the configuration that finally worked the top spar was pulled down so that it almost became a mast extension. The shorter sail will let me move the suspension point for the top spar forward, which will let me reduce the tension on the front of the top spar, which will reduce the flexing, aaaand… Have multiple attachment points for the boom (rather than just the ends now), which means that a downhaul on the boom will mean that not only is the sail pulled tight at the luff, it’ll be pulled tight along the foot and not just at the clew.

I’m starting to think that there’ll be another sailboat in my woodworking future, the question is: will it be bigger, and if so will it be large enough to get outside of the continental shelf so we can go whale watching in it? But I suspect that decision will wait for a year or two of sailing this around before we either get totally excited by the idea of building a cruiser (and the logistics of getting that out of our back yard would have to be addressed…), or build another day play boat. Either way, next time we build it out of something harder than redwood (still okay with cheap luan plywood as the hull skin material), because the gunwales are already showing wear.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1276 posts in 1581 days


#7 posted 751 days ago

Waste of time. You don’t want glass at the core. That is not where it will give you any strength. You could probably stand to make a new boom. The yard looks ok. The mast looks a bit short. Don’t feel bad. My mast ended up about a foot short on mine that I have in my garage right now. I will need to whack off the sail at the first reef point.

My last build was one of Mik Storers OzRacers. With the lugsail, it has a terrifying amount of sail on an 8’ boat.
Looking at the page for Summer Breeze, it has 63 sq. ft. on a nearly 12ft hull. The OzRacer lug comes in at about 80 sq. ft. on an 8ft hull. :) Trimming it down will still leave me with plenty of sail for our wind here.The mast is a hollow box construction about 3in square at the partner.

You have already doomed yourself. The first one gets you hooked. They are just so much fun to build. I have not even gotten my last one in the water and I am anxious to start on the next one. I have plans for 2 that I might build or maybe I will do something else. I have the plans for a Welsford Truant and a Bolger Oldshoe.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View Dan Lyke's profile

Dan Lyke

1464 posts in 2708 days


#8 posted 750 days ago

Grins. Yeah, I haven’t looked at the compressive strength of redwood to figure out how increasing the tensile strength at the core would change things, I really should engineer out something like that before I try it. Or just buy some prefab spars.

re: 80 sq. ft. on an 8ft hull… Yikes! I was thinking about building a Sunfish knock-off at first, but we decided that sedate traipsing around the lake at 2MPH was really the desired use case. We don’t have flotation in this hull, if we capsize it’s gonna be a long swim to drag the thing to shore. Given that we were able to hit 6+MPH in the moderate winds we had, we can lose a lot of sail area.

And, yeah, now that I’m hooked… I’m also starting to look at and think about cabinetry and furniture making in different ways: There’ll definitely be more veneered bent plywood in the interior of my house in the future.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

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