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Turned handles #3: Handles are finished and mounted

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Blog entry by Dan Krager posted 05-31-2013 10:36 PM 1030 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Brass ferrules arrived Part 3 of Turned handles series Part 4: A brief interruption »

I finally finished the carving gouge handle project. These are mostly Addis blades a couple Buck Brothers This represents about half of my total collection, so I am well equipped to move ahead on some SERIOUS carving projects. The other half consists of newer Pfeil gouges and some miniature gouges and chisels. As noted before, I’m planning a Grinling Gibbons style carving and this is a major step towards beginning work. I have some experiments to perform to test procedure and material. The design elements need to be sketched out to work the details satisfactorily. I’ll post progress pictures now and then in a new blog series.

Anybody interested in the old handles?

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com



7 comments so far

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2420 posts in 2189 days


#1 posted 05-31-2013 10:48 PM

Nice carving set up…nice handles too!

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

32 posts in 689 days


#2 posted 05-31-2013 11:11 PM

Dan- bravo my friend! Fabulous job.
Grumbling gibbons eh? That’s quite an undertaking.
I look forward to the whole progress. Design Et al.
Jonathan

-- Jhopewell, New Hampshire, www.hopewellwoodwork.com

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

32 posts in 689 days


#3 posted 05-31-2013 11:13 PM

Grumbling? Grinling. :-). Bloody spellcheck

-- Jhopewell, New Hampshire, www.hopewellwoodwork.com

View Dan Krager's profile (online now)

Dan Krager

1742 posts in 985 days


#4 posted 06-01-2013 12:07 AM

HA HA HA HA HA ha, ho ho, mmm. That’s funny, Jonathan!

Guess how all those got sharpened and honed?
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

View Brit's profile

Brit

5310 posts in 1594 days


#5 posted 06-08-2013 01:10 PM

Nice job Dan! That’s a fine collection you’re building up there. How did they all get sharpened and honed? Also, where did you learn how to sharpen all of the different profiles.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View Dan Krager's profile (online now)

Dan Krager

1742 posts in 985 days


#6 posted 06-08-2013 01:52 PM

That means a lot, Brit, coming from you! Thank you.
I never got real serious about sharpening anything until maybe 20 years ago. Sure I sharpened things and kept them honed, but I think you could say that I’m fanatical about it now. It goes back to watching my Dad work with dull tools. It was almost comical. But as I’ve gotten into more demanding projects, my tools have to be SHARP enough to make hairs run away if the tool is pointed in their direction. I learned by practicing what I’ve read about and found what works best for me.

I recently traded tools with an LJ, (Jonathan) swapping a Foley Sharpmaster for a Tormek T7. I am in love! I’ve now got every jig to sharpen most anything and it does it so consistently. I made many of the jigs myself so they have greater capacity and versatility than Tormeks. With this tool I have sharpened scissors that have never worked right before. Japanese swords are challenging because of their size and you don’t want to see the bevel, but this does it SO perfectly! I still have a Belsaw Sharp All for saw blades and other cruder stuff, but all my precision cutting tools are done on this Tormek now. I’ve never had my chip carving knife so sharp!
It has leather strop wheels for all chisel and gouge shapes and sizes now. The green micro-chromium rouge has become my favorite. I’ve tried just about everything on the market.

I have another unique sharpening gadget for the miniatures. It’s a dentist tool sharpener where a tiny diamond plate or Arkansas stone is held in a variable speed reciprocating fixture with appropriate rest points for tools. I’ve successfully sharpened a #81 drill bit with it. I have two smaller drill bits that will make a hole so small that you can’t push a hair though it! They were used to drill brass gas jets. So, a lot of my “knowledge” has come from exposure to industry and my insatiable curiosity.
DanK

-- Dan Krager, Olney IL http://www.kragerwoodworking.weebly.com

View Brit's profile

Brit

5310 posts in 1594 days


#7 posted 06-08-2013 01:59 PM

Thanks for the detailed reply Dan. Sound like a great set up.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

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