LumberJocks

Wall Unit Project #2: Countertop progress

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by DS posted 03-05-2013 05:26 PM 980 reads 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Wood Gloat! Weekend Progress Part 2 of Wall Unit Project series Part 3: Why I hate Polyurethane finish »

The challenge is to make a 127 1/2” long countertop that looks good using only 41” long plywood peices.

A trick I learned a long time ago is to place an alternate grain strip between end grain splices. It looks way better, in my opinion, than end grain to end grain joinery.

Also, I am using only plywood for this top—no solid wood. The build up is a little different here.
The front edge is a maple veneer that I had left over from another job.

The thing about an almost 11 foot top and 8 foot veneer is there needs to be a seam. Fortunately the grain is fairly homogenous on this peice and I matched it up really nicely with an angled splice.

Now you see it…

... now you don’t

The top got a clear sealer coat and I had to call it a night.

Tonight it will get a color coat—a semi-transparent dark brown dye fogged over the sealer.
Then the finished clear lacquer top coat and installation onto the wall unit.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251



11 comments so far

View Drew - Rock-n H Woodshop's profile

Drew - Rock-n H Woodshop

638 posts in 1444 days


#1 posted 03-05-2013 05:55 PM

Great idea, way to think on your feet. I too have used the angled joint for crown molding. It just hides so much better than a standard butt joint. Looking forward to more posts on the progress.

-- Drew -- "I cut it twice and it's still too short!"- Rock-n H Woodshop - Moore, OK

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7950 posts in 2805 days


#2 posted 03-05-2013 06:09 PM

Interesting unique design!

Looking GREAT!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

14676 posts in 1428 days


#3 posted 03-05-2013 06:19 PM

Nicely done!!!

I like “Gin Joints with Butts”, but I don’t like “Butt Joints”!!!

I like the look of lacquer, but I hear it is difficult to spray. What have you found to be the case???

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

3872 posts in 2121 days


#4 posted 03-05-2013 06:20 PM

OK, it’s fabricated and soon to be colorizes, and lacquered … how do you plan to move this rcan’tather large piece and I’ll let you know right now I live too far away to help!

Can’t wait to see it with the lacquer on it!

I see that your work table is made out of Al extrutions. I keep some of that around for temporary set ups like when I was finishing some 120” pieces of oak base. Like the add says “an industrial erector set”.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View DS's profile

DS

2132 posts in 1173 days


#5 posted 03-05-2013 06:27 PM

Hans, technically, that is my up-and-coming CNC machine framework doing double duty for the moment as an assembly bench. The A axis is mocked up down under there somewhere.

You can see the corner of my actual assembly table in the last photo. It is only 36 X 48 and not adequate for such a long peice.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View DS's profile

DS

2132 posts in 1173 days


#6 posted 03-05-2013 06:35 PM

Randy, I’ve been spraying lacquer since I started woodworking. My biggest frustration is making sure the gun is set up properly. It always seems to come down to trial and error a bit. Weather can play a role, as well as the specific material you are spraying.

I like the pre-cat stuff since it flashes out dry to touch in only 15 minutes. The downside to pre-cat is it goes bad in the can only 120 days after it is catalyzed.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4940 posts in 2635 days


#7 posted 03-05-2013 08:15 PM

Very nice.
Good pointers on dealing with shorter boards. The seams do look better with a cross strip. Neat.

You got class Sir,
Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

14676 posts in 1428 days


#8 posted 03-05-2013 08:28 PM

SPalm,
Now don’t go inflating DS’ already OVER inflated ego!!! Lol. ;^)

Thanks for the lacquer info. I’ve got spray equipment, but I haven’t used it yet. The day is coming though, that I build a spray booth and start spraying!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View stefang's profile

stefang

13633 posts in 2087 days


#9 posted 03-05-2013 09:04 PM

Good job. The seams look great with the strips. I used this same technique when I extended my outdoor deck and it turned out real good.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View boxcarmarty's profile

boxcarmarty

9842 posts in 1113 days


#10 posted 03-06-2013 03:48 AM

Nice…..

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

View JL7's profile

JL7

7488 posts in 1718 days


#11 posted 03-06-2013 09:54 PM

Looking good…...nice way to use up those parts and make it look like you wanted it that all along…..

-- Jeff - I have not failed. I've just found 10,002 ways that won't work.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase