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CL Find -- NEW (to me) Tablesaw. Jet JWSS-10FLR

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Blog entry by DS posted 887 days ago 1689 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Well, the old 2.5hp Craftsman 10” TS is now retired. It was beginning to fall apart and no amount of JB weld or duct tape was gonna keep it going much longer.

Its last project—Stumpy’s Tubafore contest. (Being as I won the contest, I figured maybe it was time to get the kind of respectable tools that such a station deserves. heheh Ok, maybe a little better saw than that—No offense Stumpy)

I’d been lurking on CL for almost a year trying to decide what to get. I’d read every TS forum on here. Read the reviews ad nauseum. Finally it happened. The saw I wanted on CL for $500—In Las Vegas… dang!
I began rationalizing how to get it. Las Vegas is $150 in gas and 11 hours round trip driving from Phoenix.
That would bring the cost to around $650 plus losing my whole weekend. (Not to mention the losses at the casino—it’s Vegas afterall.)

Then there was this ad in Scotsdale for $900 for the same saw. Would he take $700? It’d be worth it.

After a few calls over that last few days, he says he would take $750 for the saw. BINGO! My weekend was worth at least $100 to me, so off I went.


This pic was what the guy emailed to me when I replied to his ad. I’ll be taking new photos later today (Notice the blade guard still in the factory packaging down below the table)

When I get to this guy’s place, I am amazed by the tools he had. This guy was set up nice.
When I asked why he was selling the saw, he said he thought he’d try his hand at wood working, but discovered, after buying all the tools, that he wasn’t that good at it.

In my head I’m thinking, “Isn’t this like golf? Do it because you enjoy it. And, if you’re good at it, all the better!” On the other hand, I figure I’d better not talk him out of selling me the saw either! So I didn’t say anything. He told me about how he inherited a bunch of tools from his Dad when he passed and he showed me about 30 vintage planes. He wasn’t really sure what to do with them, but he isn’t ready to sell any either.

The saw weighed over 400 lbs. We ended up taking it apart in order to load it into my truck.
When I got it home I took a couple 4/4 rough sawn Maple planks from the rack, screwed them to a 2X4 clamped in my workmate and built a ramp to slide it off the tailgate. My truck is 4X4 so the tailgate is pretty high up. Unloading it by myself was a bit precarious, but workable with the gravity assist and all.

I took my time putting it together. Checking and aligning everything as I went. This model has a slider on the left side of the table which is likely only slightly better than a basic miter gauge. Still, I am hoping it will come in handy. The table is pretty flat, but there is a slight bow front to back (about 0.007”) in the sliding portion of the table that is starting to bug me. In my head, I’m already trying to figure out how to machine it flat again.

I’m not very impressed with the fence. The tail end of it isn’t very rigid and flexes when pushed. Also the hairline in the sight-glass moves based on your viewing angle. I’m still checking if these two issues can be adjusted or fixed.

This morning all the muscles in my body are telling me I was heaving about a 400 lb saw the day before. I’m not nearly as young as I used to be.

Hopefully, I’ll be cutting wood with it tonight. It will be a good break from having to use one leg to keep the saw from moving while trying to rip 8/4 Maple. At a bare minimum, at least I won’t be as embarrassed to take photos of my messy workshop anymore. Pics to follow.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251



14 comments so far

View ShaneA's profile (online now)

ShaneA

5209 posts in 1184 days


#1 posted 887 days ago

Score, I love new acquisitions. Sounds like you did good. Maybe follow up with the seller in a month or two about more tools. Congrats!

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7595 posts in 2638 days


#2 posted 887 days ago

Very GOOD!

Hope you can get it tuned & fixed to satisfy you…

Looks like a nice saw…

Looking fwd to seeing it and results after you get it operating.

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4328 posts in 1622 days


#3 posted 887 days ago

All the best with your ‘new’ saw. I think second hand tools are a lot more fun than new ones.I feel I can do more to them in the way of modifications without feeling bad about it or voiding the guarantee.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View stefang's profile

stefang

12422 posts in 1920 days


#4 posted 887 days ago

Congrats on your new table saw. If you have a decent bandsaw, that would a lot easier to rip thick stock with and you would be saving wear and tear on your table saw.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View DS's profile

DS

2131 posts in 1006 days


#5 posted 887 days ago

Mike, yes, I have a 19” bandsaw, so ripping 8/4 is less of a concern. The old Craftsman was getting really rickety and unstable.
I can’t wait to get the new saw up and running. I always managed to “make do” with whatever tools I had. For any large jobs, they would shift to a CNC machine leased at a local cabinet shop. It sure diminishes the need for a heavy duty table saw.

It’s just time though. So far, no regrets.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Dave's profile

Dave

11134 posts in 1426 days


#6 posted 887 days ago

Nice catch. If you would stop cutting tuba’s you wouldn’t tear them up as fast. Good luck on you flattening issue. Keep us posted.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View DS's profile

DS

2131 posts in 1006 days


#7 posted 887 days ago

Brass tubas are non-ferrous. Carbide should cut it just fine… Must be a Craftsman issue. heheh

I’ve got a JET now! Bring on the tubafores!

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Roger's profile

Roger

13976 posts in 1390 days


#8 posted 887 days ago

hope ya make out with the flattening deal ok. keep us posted. keep the Craftsman fer choppin up them tuba’z

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

View Eddie's profile

Eddie

27 posts in 917 days


#9 posted 887 days ago

i got a jet lots older but you’ll love it good buy

-- Jesus is ok with me

View DS's profile

DS

2131 posts in 1006 days


#10 posted 886 days ago

Well, here it is in its new environs.

I’ll eventually get the dust collection lines run over there. The DC and all the hoses and fittings are still boxed up from the move.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7595 posts in 2638 days


#11 posted 886 days ago

COOL SETUP!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View RibsBrisket4me's profile

RibsBrisket4me

1376 posts in 1091 days


#12 posted 886 days ago

Really nice!!!!!!!!!!!!!

-- http://www.PictureTrail.com/gid6255915

View Dave's profile

Dave

11134 posts in 1426 days


#13 posted 886 days ago

Looking good!

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View DS's profile

DS

2131 posts in 1006 days


#14 posted 857 days ago

BTW, the flatness issue has gotten much better after about a week in my place.
There must’ve been some heat expansion and other stresses from the move. It’s still not perfect, but about half of what it used to be.
I had to go back a re-tune it after it settled down some. For now, I think it is workable.

Thanks for all the good comments.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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