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Rehab Rigid TS3650/ Experimenting with electrolysis #1: Rehab Rigid TS3650/ Experimenting with electrolysis

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Blog entry by CudaDude posted 10-24-2014 01:41 AM 2113 reads 2 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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I was given this TS a few weeks ago and was thinking I’d just part it out because I knew I didn’t want to mess around with sanding the table that was covered with rust. Then I remembered about electrolysis for rust removal… I have never attempted it, but read about it and figured I didn’t have anything to lose. My first thought was to get a little plastic kiddie pool to submerge the table in, but in a town with only a old NON-Super Walmart, it ain’t happening this time of year. So, I cut the top out of my future 55 gal plastic compost bin. A manual battery charger, some Arm and Hammer soda wash, and a lot of water, I was in business. After pulling from the tank, I wet sanded a little with mineral spirits and 400 grit. I have a hard time trying to remember to take pictures during projects but here’s what I have. I’ll post more when I’m finished with the saw.

-- Gary



14 comments so far

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

6471 posts in 2058 days


#1 posted 10-24-2014 01:46 AM

Looks like a success.

View DavidTTU's profile

DavidTTU

115 posts in 1095 days


#2 posted 10-24-2014 02:09 AM

no way.

View MNclone's profile

MNclone

187 posts in 1044 days


#3 posted 10-24-2014 02:21 AM

That is awesome. How big of a battery charger did you have hooked up to that?

View B4B's profile

B4B

129 posts in 818 days


#4 posted 10-24-2014 02:58 AM

Yeah, I’ve looked into this and it does work. From what I was reading around the interwebs is that a 2 AMP manual battery charger is more than enough, any more amperage and you’re just wasting electricity.

It can and does give off hydrogen gas, so best to do this in an open area with plenty of ventilation. You can keep re-using the same bath over and over again. Generally speaking it’s non-toxic.

Just don’t do chrome, or you’ll have a toxic slurry to deal with.

How long did you let this bathe for before you pulled it out?

-- There's two routers in my vocab, one that moves data and one that removes wood, the latter being more relevant on this forum.

View CudaDude's profile

CudaDude

176 posts in 1768 days


#5 posted 10-24-2014 03:58 AM

B4B’s right, just a 2 amp charger. I broke the table down into the three sections and bathed each one for approx 24 hours and would open the garage for a few minutes to let air out before I entered.

-- Gary

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2794 days


#6 posted 10-24-2014 06:57 AM

I’d like to try that sometime. Now if I can just find something that’s rusty.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Lenny's profile

Lenny

1486 posts in 2987 days


#7 posted 10-24-2014 08:38 AM

I’ve used the process on handplanes. It works well and from what I understand, you had no need for concern about entering, as the process is completely safe. An ugly duckling turns into a beautiful swan!

-- On the eighth day God was back in His woodworking shop! Lenny, East Providence, RI

View ratchet's profile

ratchet

1389 posts in 3247 days


#8 posted 10-24-2014 01:00 PM

He shoots he scores! Nice rehab. You are to be commended on the save.

View LJackson's profile

LJackson

295 posts in 1054 days


#9 posted 10-24-2014 02:35 PM

I wish there was a picture after removal from the bath, and before sanding. How much sanding did you have to do? I imagine, at 400 grit, that you didn’t need to do much.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8236 posts in 2888 days


#10 posted 10-24-2014 02:49 PM

Great save!

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View CudaDude's profile

CudaDude

176 posts in 1768 days


#11 posted 10-24-2014 02:55 PM



I wish there was a picture after removal from the bath, and before sanding. How much sanding did you have to do? I imagine, at 400 grit, that you didn t need to do much.

- LJackson

I have not sanded the center section yet. It’s been out for a day and has some surface rust now. I’ll post pics tonight before I sand.

-- Gary

View Grumpymike's profile

Grumpymike

1914 posts in 1775 days


#12 posted 10-24-2014 05:43 PM

Wow, I’m impressed … what did you use for the anodes at the sides of the tub?? and the positive goes to the anode and the negative goes to the table top … right or am I bassakwords???

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

View CudaDude's profile

CudaDude

176 posts in 1768 days


#13 posted 10-24-2014 10:06 PM



Wow, I m impressed … what did you use for the anodes at the sides of the tub?? and the positive goes to the anode and the negative goes to the table top … right or am I bassakwords???

- Grumpymike

The anodes are just some scrap angle iron I had laying around. Two of them were about 6 inches long and the third was about 12. The more surface area on the anodes, the better, as the rust that’s released from your project accumulates on the anodes. Yes, you’re correct. + to anodes, – to what you’re removing rust from.

-- Gary

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

5042 posts in 2607 days


#14 posted 10-25-2014 12:09 AM

Holy crap that’s amazing!

-- Dean

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