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Wood of the day #11: Giant Sequoia (Curly)

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Blog entry by CreekOne posted 01-15-2015 02:53 PM 2289 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 10: Norfolk Island Pine Part 11 of Wood of the day series Part 12: Giant Sequoia (Old growth) »

  • Common name(s): Giant Sequoia, Giant Redwood, Sierra Redwood, Sierran Redwood, Wellingtonia
  • Botanical name: Sequoiadendron giganteum
  • Synonymous: Wellingtonia gigantea (Former name, 1853), Sequoia gigantea (Former name, 1854), Washingtonia californica (Former name, 1854),
  • Distribution: Sierra Nevada Mountains of California
  • Description: Very lightweight wood with a papery feel to it, Giant Sequoia has a light brown to dark red-brown heartwood and a pale yellow/white sapwood. Its straight grained and easy to split. Takes a really nice shiny finish when hand planed.
  • Fun facts: This sample is from a curly piece but you can’t hardly see it. Curly wood and burls are not uncommon.
    This wood is considered more or less useless for commercial use due to it being to fragile to fell as the wood tend to split when it hits the ground.
    Giant sequoias are the world’s largest single trees and largest living thing by volume. Largest is General Sherman)
  • Sampled by: Me


12 comments so far

View Lynn Bradford.'s profile

Lynn Bradford.

68 posts in 1323 days


#1 posted 01-15-2015 04:11 PM

I like your pictures of the various woods. Have you thought about spraying water or giving half the sample a wipe with mineral spirits, just to show the grain and what it could look like finished? That would be awesome!

I enjoy reading your posts of the wood samples. Very informative.

LB

-- Lynn Bradford | Indiana | A poor excuse is better than none.

View CreekOne's profile

CreekOne

113 posts in 833 days


#2 posted 01-15-2015 06:33 PM



Have you thought about spraying water or giving half the sample a wipe with mineral spirits, just to show the grain and what it could look like finished? That would be awesome!

I did give this a thought and a test just before I started this but the thing that stopped this idea is that I have a etiquette on the other side of all the samples and that the texture change on many of the woods when they get wet.

View ronniebo's profile

ronniebo

126 posts in 2126 days


#3 posted 01-15-2015 10:04 PM

yourfotos and comments are greats are great. Many thanks.
I have a 40 year old giant redwood in my backyard in Blackmans Bay, Tasmania which was planted by the horticulturist son of the previous owner.
The previous owner chopped another one down to make way for a subdivision and I now have dried that one in slabs for two years and am nearly ready start using that wood.
Will try to add some fotos when I get it out of the pile.
Ron in Hobart Tassie.

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13448 posts in 1317 days


#4 posted 01-15-2015 10:09 PM

You have a redwood or a sequoia? I tried to grow sequoia from seeds I bought but they all died.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View CreekOne's profile

CreekOne

113 posts in 833 days


#5 posted 01-15-2015 10:49 PM


I have a 40 year old giant redwood in my backyard
- ronniebo

Sounds really great!


You have a redwood or a sequoia?
- firefighterontheside

firefighterontheside, your question is strange…
Sequoia sempervirens, known as Redwood, Sequoia, Coast Redwood, California Redwood is not the same as Sequoiadendron giganteum, known as Giant Sequoia, Giant Redwood, Sierra Redwood, Sierran Redwood, Wellingtonia.
As ronniebo wrote giant redwood, you can assume its nether a redwood or a sequoia.

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13448 posts in 1317 days


#6 posted 01-15-2015 11:35 PM

Exactly. A sequoia is a sequoia and a coastal redwood is a coastal redwood even though some of the common names mistake one for the other.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View CreekOne's profile

CreekOne

113 posts in 833 days


#7 posted 01-16-2015 12:01 AM


Exactly. A sequoia is a sequoia and a coastal redwood is a coastal redwood even though some of the common names mistake one for the other.
- firefighterontheside

This is even stranger, did you read what I wrote?
Lets take this again…
In the family Cupressaceae there is a Subfamily, Sequoioideae.
In this Subfamily, Sequoioideae, there are three Genera, Sequoia, Sequoiadendron and Metasequoia.
The genera Sequoia has one species Sequoia sempervirens.
The genera Sequoiadendron has one living species Sequoiadendron giganteum.
The genera Metasequoia has one living species Metasequoia glyptostroboides.

The species Sequoia sempervirens is commonly known as Coast redwood, Coastal redwood, California redwood, Redwood and Sequoia

The species Sequoiadendron giganteum is commonly known as Giant sequoia, Giant redwood, Sierra redwood, Sierran redwood or Wellingtonia

The species Metasequoia glyptostroboides is commonly known as Dawn redwood

So by saying:


A sequoia is a sequoia and a coastal redwood is a coastal redwood even though some of the common names mistake one for the other.

You don’t make sense as the tree commonly named Sequoia and the tree commonly named Coastal redwood are both common names of Cupressaceae Sequoioideae Sequoia sempervirens.
This will by my account make it the exact same species, ie. the same tree.

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13448 posts in 1317 days


#8 posted 01-16-2015 12:20 AM

Well, I’ve seen all three. They are not the same tree.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View flotilla's profile

flotilla

3 posts in 688 days


#9 posted 01-16-2015 12:45 AM

My wife and I visited California some months back and had the opportunity to visit some of the areas where the giant sequoias grow. I think that is the correct name for the trees we saw——including the one that you can drive your car through. Anyway, it is a most impressive experience to be in the presence of living things that old and that huge. Glad to be a member of your group.

-- John N. in Alabama

View CreekOne's profile

CreekOne

113 posts in 833 days


#10 posted 01-16-2015 12:50 AM

firefighterontheside, I don’t know what to say… you don’t seem to understand what I’m trying to say.
Sequoia and Coastal Redwood is the same Species… Sequoia sempervirens… can it be more clear?

View CreekOne's profile

CreekOne

113 posts in 833 days


#11 posted 01-16-2015 01:31 AM

So I went at my collection to find my three favourite species…

And today, Friday, I’ll post 4 more wood of the day samples.. To make this question about Sequoioideae subfamily clear or more confusing… you all decide!

View CreekOne's profile

CreekOne

113 posts in 833 days


#12 posted 01-16-2015 02:11 AM


My wife and I visited California some months back and had the opportunity to visit some of the areas where the giant sequoias grow. I think that is the correct name for the trees we saw——including the one that you can drive your car through. Anyway, it is a most impressive experience to be in the presence of living things that old and that huge. Glad to be a member of your group.

- flotilla

I have never heard of a Giant sequoia that was drive through but I know of at least three huge Sequoia's that you can drive through..
I think the Chandelier Tree is the most famous of these? They might be over exaggerating the age of 2,400 years as the General Sherman has an estimated age of 2,300–2,700 years…



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