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How do I attach the legs- Question?

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Blog entry by Chelios posted 03-09-2010 06:41 AM 1207 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Here is the basic architecture of a small table I am building. It is a 33×33x2 square with six legs. The legs are 2×6x16 in

Question is how do I attach the legs so that it is structurally sound without an apron or rails. It is all made in 8/4 stock and it is 16 in in height. I have considered dowels but I would take any advice you can give me. What joining method will work best?

thanks for your help



9 comments so far

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3136 days


#1 posted 03-09-2010 10:01 AM

Got me?? I’m waiting to see what they say.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View miles125's profile

miles125

2180 posts in 3465 days


#2 posted 03-09-2010 11:18 AM

Nothing is going to work great, as theres nothing to protect any joint you make from racking forces on the table. Screw through the top and plug the screw holes with dowel is about as good as it gets. Someone asked me once why i use screws where they would tend to use dowels. I responded by noting that the screw is the much superior threaded steel dowel :)

-- "The way to make a small fortune in woodworking- start with a large one"

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

5256 posts in 3342 days


#3 posted 03-09-2010 03:37 PM

What Miles said.

You got a challenge here. My first thought was dowels or floating tenons. You mentioned that there is no apron or rails. Yikes. That means that this attachment method will be the only structural joint in the entire table. One kick or a bump with the floor vacuum will test it for sure.

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View Don Butler's profile

Don Butler

1086 posts in 2855 days


#4 posted 03-09-2010 03:52 PM

The legs could be through-tenonned into the top. If its 8/4 thick the legs should be firmly supported.

d

-- No trees were damaged in posting this message, but thousands of electrons were seriously inconvenienced.

View PetVet's profile

PetVet

329 posts in 2947 days


#5 posted 03-09-2010 04:02 PM

I think Don is on the right track, although I would make them wedge tenons.

-- Rich in Richmond -- Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.

View Don Butler's profile

Don Butler

1086 posts in 2855 days


#6 posted 03-09-2010 04:06 PM

That’s a big ten-four!

-- No trees were damaged in posting this message, but thousands of electrons were seriously inconvenienced.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3108 days


#7 posted 03-09-2010 04:07 PM

Through tenon, or through sliding dovetails (on the edge to make for some interesting design elements). depending on what this table is for, this might be strong enough, but then again – might still require aprons or stretchers or some sort.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Chelios's profile

Chelios

568 posts in 2526 days


#8 posted 03-11-2010 01:38 AM

Guys

Thanks for the notes. These are very helpful. I made a sketch up of it to show you but I didn’t know how to upload it to LJs. I really like the idea of through tenons + wedges.

Don’t know too much about them but I think these should go in the along grain of the top right? Otherwise I might split my top? Right?

Dave thanks for the design idea. The piece the end user wants needs to be without the horizontal runners though.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3136 days


#9 posted 03-11-2010 09:25 AM

Through tennons is what I would have suggested, but not being a qualified advisor, I kept quiet. I think the tennons and wedges should be across the grain so they don’t split the top or work loose. You guys in the know holler if I’m wrong!! :-)

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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