LumberJocks

Arts & Crafts Dining Room Set #12: Rodel Chair Layout

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by CaptainSkully posted 01-29-2010 02:33 AM 3142 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 11: Next Step... Part 12 of Arts & Crafts Dining Room Set series Part 13: It's All About the Template... »

So I took a few minutes to draw this up in AutoCAD (sorry I’m not up to speed in SketchUp yet). The only dimension I had to assume were the front-to-back rails that intersect the middle of the chair back. I went with 3” because that’s what looked to scale, and gave room for a proper radius. I could’ve sprung for the $20 full-sized plans, but what’s the fun in that? The reason I drew this out is because the back is defined by a 7 degree angle. I thought it would be more accurate to locate the top of the back using Cartesian coordinates vs. a shallow angle. A little bit off on the angle, and you’re way off at the top.

I’ll need to get some masonite. I think MDF might be a little mushy to make router templates out of for so many copies, plus the added depth complicates things. A nice thin hardboard template will allow me to use all of my pattern following bit/plunge with no worries. It’s brilliant to screw the blank to the template at the mortise hole locations (not shown). It looks like I’ll have to do a series of routing along straight edges to make the template perfect, which of course will make all the chairs perfect, right?

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails



4 comments so far

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1437 posts in 3025 days


#1 posted 01-29-2010 05:18 AM

For some reason, the drawing isn’t posting properly. I’ll try again later.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1437 posts in 3025 days


#2 posted 01-29-2010 07:30 PM

There was a typo in my file name. Sorry for the double post.

The nice thing about investing the time to make a perfect template is that all of your parts come out perfect, with minimal sanding required, they come out exactly the same, and you get to keep the templates so if you want to make another set of chairs in five years, half the work is already done.

I remembered that I forgot that the template isn’t exactly like the finished product, which is new to me. The template has to run long on either end for the spacer blocks that hold the template together. You wouldn’t want to route the end grain anyway.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1437 posts in 3025 days


#3 posted 01-30-2010 02:22 AM

That’s pretty darn cool Dave. I’m making a single prototype (out of QSWO), getting all the mistakes out of the way (hopefully), then cranking out the other five (unless I need to replace the prototype). I figure that if I blog about the prototype enough, then I’ll be able to help myself on the batched chairs.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3043 days


#4 posted 01-30-2010 03:25 AM

It Should be a good project.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com