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In the wood shop today #3: Glued up rocking chair headrest

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Blog entry by Canadian Woodworks posted 757 days ago 3737 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Walnut rocking chair parts Part 3 of In the wood shop today series Part 4: Using Epoxy resin to fill a knot hole »

Hey all, I’ve made another video this time I’ve just glued up the headrest of the current rocking chair I’m working on, I also discuss a little bit about the back braces. Hope you like it and again thanks for stopping by to have a look.


-- Paul Lemiski, Ontario Canada, Custom Wooden Rocking chairs and tables http://www.canadianwoodworks.com



7 comments so far

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6764 posts in 1898 days


#1 posted 757 days ago

paul, im really enjoying the rocking chair and others your doing, i have not taken on a chair like this yet, but im learning a lot from you and these video’s, i want to ask what it is your finishing these chairs with, looks like a rub on of some type..thanks again for doing these. grizz

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View Canadian Woodworks's profile

Canadian Woodworks

602 posts in 1665 days


#2 posted 756 days ago

Hey grizzman,

I use a 3 part mixture which includes equal parts of – Boiled Linseed Oil, Raw Tung Oil and Poly Urethane (semi-gloss)

I sand any piece I make to 500-1000grit using abralon pads then burnish with a wool pad from festool. People see my chairs before I apply finish and ask me what I’ve applied to them to get them so smooth and shiny.

I then brush on the finish with a cheap foam brush let sit for about 30min then wipe off completely, you really want to make sure to wipe the finish off completely especially around end grain as it has a tendency to squeeze out some finish after being wiped. I typically apply 2 – 3 coats to a chair or table base but up to 12 on a table top.

-- Paul Lemiski, Ontario Canada, Custom Wooden Rocking chairs and tables http://www.canadianwoodworks.com

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6764 posts in 1898 days


#3 posted 756 days ago

thanks paul, ill try the same mixture, but i totally understand that you have to sand your projects to a high grit in order to get a good looking finish, when i was in the army in 1980 we had to keep out barracks floor as shiny as we could get it, we used Johnson paste wax and went over it with a wool blanket, until it looked like glass, im going to look at what festool has in this wool pad, as i would like to get a nice polished look on many of my wood pieces…thanks again for the videos, i like the idea of soaking the ends of the back stays in the wax to stop the squeaking..great idea…ill look for more videos from you…

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View sandhill's profile

sandhill

2102 posts in 2519 days


#4 posted 753 days ago

Nice job on the chair one of these days I will get back to building mine. Do you have the Festool 150 sander? Is that from Hal Taylors plans? That is where I got mine as well.

-- Bob Egbert AKA Sandhill http://www.sandhillwoodworks.com/

View Canadian Woodworks's profile

Canadian Woodworks

602 posts in 1665 days


#5 posted 753 days ago

Thanks sandhill, I find that as long as you keep working and completing steps along the way every chair seems to materialize eventually.

I do have a Festool 150, yes the chair is from Hal’s plans who I must say is one of the best chair designer / builder that exists. On top of that he is as good as you get when it comes to being a teacher, his book, vids and design are all top notch.

-- Paul Lemiski, Ontario Canada, Custom Wooden Rocking chairs and tables http://www.canadianwoodworks.com

View sandhill's profile

sandhill

2102 posts in 2519 days


#6 posted 752 days ago

I agree and I am lucky enough to be 30 min from his location I plan to drop in on him soon. Would you recommend the 150 for chair building and does it come with the soft pad Hal recommends?

-- Bob Egbert AKA Sandhill http://www.sandhillwoodworks.com/

View Canadian Woodworks's profile

Canadian Woodworks

602 posts in 1665 days


#7 posted 751 days ago

I 100% recommend the RO-150, I think the only part that it is a little tight is under the arm joint to the seat but you can get most of it done. I use a RO-125 for about 20minutes the other hours and hours of sanding is done with the RO-150

-- Paul Lemiski, Ontario Canada, Custom Wooden Rocking chairs and tables http://www.canadianwoodworks.com

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