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Time lapse Woodworking #9: Carving walnut bar stool seat

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Blog entry by Canadian Woodworks posted 1288 days ago 2364 reads 5 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 8: Sanding and Assembly Frame & Panel Part 9 of Time lapse Woodworking series Part 10: A Chair - Oil/Resin Finish Application »

In this video in my time lapse wood working series, I’m carving a Canadian Black Walnut seat.
I have already laid out the seat outline and drilled my depth holes as reference. I first use a kutzall coarse carbide disc to rough grind the seat. I find it best to remove material evenly over the entire seat.

Once I finish with the rough grinding, I switch to a 7’’ 60 grit sanding disc on my much larger and heavier ridgid grinder. This is a work out on the fore arms!

I then flip the seat over and do a little more rough grinding, then touch up the front of the seat where the back of your knees bend, this part of the send need to be a nice fair curve to add style and comfort.

Once I’m happy with the rough sanding I move on to the festool sander using 150grit.

The music provided for this video is from Watasun a band that I friend of mine is in, he plays a cajon and steel drums. I hope you enjoy the tune if you’d like to hear more of there music from WATASUN please visit there myspace page.

For more information on designing and building our furniture please visit my Custom woodworking design and build blog

-- Paul Lemiski, Ontario Canada, Custom Wooden Rocking chairs and tables http://www.canadianwoodworks.com



7 comments so far

View rkoorman's profile

rkoorman

370 posts in 1448 days


#1 posted 1288 days ago

Nico video, great looking product.

-- http://thewoodworkersattic.blogspot.com/

View Canadian Woodworks's profile

Canadian Woodworks

604 posts in 1694 days


#2 posted 1287 days ago

Way to step to the plate, 9 seats is a work out! Have your carbs in the morning and protein after the carving…. (-:

-- Paul Lemiski, Ontario Canada, Custom Wooden Rocking chairs and tables http://www.canadianwoodworks.com

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2603 posts in 1674 days


#3 posted 1287 days ago

Thanks for posting this, it really gives me an idea of how exactly that stage of the process is done. I love watching that seat take form… a transformation before the eyes in a little over 4-minutes. How long was this stage in real-time?

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Canadian Woodworks's profile

Canadian Woodworks

604 posts in 1694 days


#4 posted 1287 days ago

I’m pretty sure I set the speed at 6 frames per second and my camera 1 frame per second….....

By our mathematical skills we determined that this 4 minutes = 24 minutes real time

-- Paul Lemiski, Ontario Canada, Custom Wooden Rocking chairs and tables http://www.canadianwoodworks.com

View RexMcKinnon's profile

RexMcKinnon

2593 posts in 1819 days


#5 posted 1287 days ago

That’s a great video. Thanks for the info.

Also just checked out your website. Really nice stuff.

-- If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail!

View rkoorman's profile

rkoorman

370 posts in 1448 days


#6 posted 1286 days ago

Nice video, I thought about doing something like that on my blog.

How do you remove the dust from your shop?

rick

-- http://thewoodworkersattic.blogspot.com/

View Canadian Woodworks's profile

Canadian Woodworks

604 posts in 1694 days


#7 posted 1286 days ago

I have the seat mounted to my lathe which is at the far corner of my shop, just out of frame to the left and up is a 6’’ dust port that is an almost straight line towards the 3hp dust collector, I think I have about 1500 cfm about 1 foot away from where I’m carving in this video. So I can carve a seat or 2 and only have dust in about a 4’ circumference around the carving area.

When finished I keep my dust collector on blow the entire area with an air gun, which almost all gets sucked up, then sweep the floor, with 5min of clean up you wouldn’t even know I did any work.

Although my arms do know work was done.

-- Paul Lemiski, Ontario Canada, Custom Wooden Rocking chairs and tables http://www.canadianwoodworks.com

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