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Double lacewood rocking chair #3: A beautiful day in the shop

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Blog entry by Canadian Woodworks posted 1494 days ago 1094 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Carve, Cut, Sand, and a little bit of glue Part 3 of Double lacewood rocking chair series Part 4: Taken it easy on a Saturday »

First things first I glued the rear legs in the morning, did’t take a picture but I did take one on how I router the legs on the router table.

I’ve now glued up all the back braces so there ready for there next tep but not yet other work to be done first.

I use a swinging jig on my band saw with 1/2’’ blade, swings the coopered headrest to produce a near perfect cut…...sweeeet! One of my favorite parts of the construction

Now on to front legs stuff, bandsaw, sand, rout, sand and glue on adder block to top of leg, then glue front legs to seat.

Also creating the front legs is another favorite step they go from a square block of wood to 95% complete in about 1 hour, I actually took pictures of each step but I have a ting with taking a picture and turning the camera off to fast I will stop doing that sa it does not allow the picture to save…..

The last 2 pictures show how well this chair is engineered i just placed the arm on top of the glueing up front leg, this joint was cut as the first step of cutting out the rear leg, then just touched up with a disc sander. The arm side was not even cut it was the end of the board apparently square…....

I’ll admit I should have trimmed the arm blank on the end, just means a little more sanding, good thing this wood has no checking, i mean none at all on any board!

Also there’s a good amount of wood under the arm joint, because I just missed trimming it at one point with the band saw, funny thing is the other side is trimmed, ahh well again just a little more grinding.

-- Paul Lemiski, Ontario Canada, Custom Wooden Rocking chairs and tables http://www.canadianwoodworks.com



12 comments so far

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6646 posts in 2582 days


#1 posted 1494 days ago

Hi Paul;

Very nicely done. I have a feeling it will be a beautiful rocker.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View tyskkvinna's profile

tyskkvinna

1308 posts in 1588 days


#2 posted 1494 days ago

Wow! This just keeps getting more beautiful :)

Looks like you’ve got quite the shop helpers too.

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

View Maveric777's profile

Maveric777

2687 posts in 1679 days


#3 posted 1494 days ago

Looking good Paul. I really like these blogs of your showing how you do these outstanding chairs. Keep it up bud…

-- Dan ~ Texarkana, Tx.

View sras's profile

sras

3780 posts in 1731 days


#4 posted 1494 days ago

I am really enjoying this blog! One question – are the back braces a lamination? You mention glueing the back braces, but in your first blog it looks like there is one strip of wood for each brace. I ask because I am becoming more convinced that a chair of this style is in my future (not ready to tackle a double yet).

Later edit – I went back and looked at the pics in your first blog entry more closely. It looks like you have two strips per brace.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112000 posts in 2179 days


#5 posted 1494 days ago

This is a great blog Paul ,thanks alot for sharing plus all the time it takes to put the blog together.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112000 posts in 2179 days


#6 posted 1494 days ago

I have a couple questions Paul
How did you attach you stock to your band saw jig?
I don’t understand how your router table set up can router your legs with that big wood donut around it.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Canadian Woodworks's profile

Canadian Woodworks

604 posts in 1672 days


#7 posted 1494 days ago

The back braces are 4 pieces laminated together, I take great care in organizing them so the grain or in this case the flecks match across front and back, my first chairs I used 2 stripes of ash in the center but found this is not a rule of thumb but does give nice contrast with a walnut chair.

I just used double sided tape, about 1/16’’ thick stuff from lee valley, hold the head rest there no problem, have not had an issue, I know have uses little vacuum clamps, but so far not needed, I even used the same tape for the 2 head rests, pulling the one off and just slapping on the other. The force needed to push it through the band saw is not much, the blade does not even make the rear thrust bearing spin.

Te inside faces of the headrest coopered pieces have been jointed, if they were rough then the double sided tape would not work so well

Because the curve of the leg and the joints, you need to use the ” donut ” to allow the 5/8’’ round over to remove wood as close to the joints as possible, then you finish the shaping by hand.

At first I shaped the corners at the joint first but learned it’s easier to rout up to the joint then shape from the joint to the round over by hand.

I’ve said it before and i’ll say it again, Hal’s plans are very very easy to follow and accurate to allow your first and your 50th chair to come out great, I can’t say enough how happy I am with his design, I now hope to build off his design to creat some of my own chairs inspired by Hal / Sam, this double is my first departure from the norm with more to come I hope.

-- Paul Lemiski, Ontario Canada, Custom Wooden Rocking chairs and tables http://www.canadianwoodworks.com

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112000 posts in 2179 days


#8 posted 1493 days ago

Thanks for that information Paul. I’m sorry but on picture #2 I don’t see how the legs make contact with the router bit at all if the legs are flat on the table with the donut in place. Do you hold the legs on top of the donut as you route. or ??? Sorry to be so dense here.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Canadian Woodworks's profile

Canadian Woodworks

604 posts in 1672 days


#9 posted 1493 days ago

You are correct Jim, hold the legs above the donunt to space the curves and joints off of the table

-- Paul Lemiski, Ontario Canada, Custom Wooden Rocking chairs and tables http://www.canadianwoodworks.com

View dakremer's profile

dakremer

2448 posts in 1694 days


#10 posted 1472 days ago

haha…i still dont get the donut thing…are you making the pieces in the picture shown with the router? those curved pieces? i’m lost (PS great blog)

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!

View Canadian Woodworks's profile

Canadian Woodworks

604 posts in 1672 days


#11 posted 1472 days ago

Sorry for the confusion, the back braces just happen to be in the picture.

The donut is needed so I can round over the edges on the legs as close to the seat joint as possible, since the joint bubbles out the legs must be raised off the table.

All this donut talk is making my hungry and want a coffee.

-- Paul Lemiski, Ontario Canada, Custom Wooden Rocking chairs and tables http://www.canadianwoodworks.com

View dakremer's profile

dakremer

2448 posts in 1694 days


#12 posted 1472 days ago

ahhhhhh…i literally just got it…cool thanks :)

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!

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