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Restoring a Walker Turner BN730 Band Saw #2: progress

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Blog entry by Camper posted 02-10-2011 05:35 AM 2751 reads 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Taking it all apart... Part 2 of Restoring a Walker Turner BN730 Band Saw series Part 3: electrolysis »

I figured I would give you guys some updates. Things are coming together pretty well.

After disassembly and cleaning I tackled the repairs to the wheel covers with some fiber mesh reinforced with a wire grid and JB weld. The wheels had some missing sections where either the PO cut parts out or the blade had taken a slice out of them. For example:

here is the mesh I used

here it is on the wheel cover

and the repair after a few coats of JB weld and sanding. The wire grid allowed me to shape that lip at the edge of the wheel cover.

This not only works on pot metal wheel covers but the holes in the cast iron frame as well

After the repairs it was on to priming and sanding. Rustoleum products are highly recommended by the guys at OWWM so I went with that. Used a primer that is suitable for clean or lightly rusted metal. I picked to go with my own color scheme rather than matching the original paint color. Decided on going with the “hammered” line of spray paints. Using hammered black for guides, knobs and wheels and dark bronze from frame, wheel covers and other parts of the saw under the table. I will polish the shafts and other parts that are stainless steel. I expect the polishing part to be challenging but we will see. So far I only finished priming and painting the hammered black parts. Here are some pictures.

Lets just say spray painting is not without challenges and there is a learning curve and useful tips and tricks but I will spare you those. There is plenty of material on this in OWWM.

Thanks for looking and fire away of you have any questions.

-- Tampa-FL



10 comments so far

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13347 posts in 2426 days


#1 posted 02-10-2011 05:42 AM

Nice fix.

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1927 days


#2 posted 02-10-2011 05:45 AM

Oh, I’m enjoying this !

Did a little body work on a few old cars, in the past, didja ? Looks like you took to that pretty quickly :-)

-- -- Neil

View lilredweldingrod's profile

lilredweldingrod

2495 posts in 1860 days


#3 posted 02-10-2011 05:50 AM

All I can say is, “Hurry and get MY saw done.” lol When you finish this, you will have something to really be proud of. Keep the pics coming. I still have a lot of popcorn left.

View Camper's profile

Camper

232 posts in 1609 days


#4 posted 02-10-2011 05:53 AM

Thanks Neil. I actually took to working with my hands later on in life so my experience is very limited. The only work I did on cars is mechanical like changing brake pads, master cylinders, distributors…minor stuff. If i did not take up woodworking I may have ended up working on cars..always enjoyed looking under the hood.

Glad you are enjoying the blog :).

Rand, you and me both!! I cannot wait to start assembly. I just finished electrolysis and cleaning the table. That will be the next episode. Stay tuned…

-- Tampa-FL

View ratchet's profile

ratchet

1304 posts in 2540 days


#5 posted 02-10-2011 03:28 PM

Sweet save on the wheel cover! Very much looking forward to future installments.
thanks for sharing it with us.

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2103 posts in 2481 days


#6 posted 02-10-2011 06:23 PM

this is looking great! how strong is the jb weld stuff? I assume it isn’t as strong as a real metal weld, but will it take a little minor abuse? Just curious.

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1927 days


#7 posted 02-10-2011 07:19 PM

If memory serves, JB Weld will act like TiteBond does, in OUR joinery: stronger than the surrounding metals.

I love the stuff. It goes with me, in my motorcycle tool kit. Handy as zip ties and duct tape :-)

-- -- Neil

View lilredweldingrod's profile

lilredweldingrod

2495 posts in 1860 days


#8 posted 02-10-2011 08:51 PM

JB Weld is a very strong epoxy and excellent for metal repair. That is the why for it’s color. I’ve had customers bring in a gasoline tanker that leaked over the weekend and it held until they brought it in for welding. It is horrible to get out of aluminum in order to prep it for welding. lol An excellent choice for this application and the wire mesh is a very good idea as well.
Camper, you have earned two atta boys today. lol Rand

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2103 posts in 2481 days


#9 posted 02-10-2011 10:00 PM

i learn something new everyday lol

View Camper's profile

Camper

232 posts in 1609 days


#10 posted 02-12-2011 03:30 AM

Thanks Rand :)

....just to add to the comments about JB weld, though I would love to, I cannot take credit for the idea of using JB Weld for the repairs. Even the fiber mesh part was recommended by the guys over at OWWM. The metal mesh part was my contribution as I really wanted to build that lip to make it look somewhat “seamless”. JB weld is very easy to work with and the trick is not to rush and complete the repair in one pass but build layers with some sanding in between and letting it dry completely.

Overall the repairs look good for my not-so-high standards (except for one were the metal is bent and its tough to bend pot metal back to original shape, so I think that will be noticeable) but the real test will be after painting…I will post those once they are done this weekend hopefully.

-- Tampa-FL

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