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Jet 6" JJ6 Jointer #2: frankenjointer...

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Blog entry by Camper posted 10-05-2010 03:15 AM 6141 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: just picked up a jointer Part 2 of Jet 6" JJ6 Jointer series Part 3: hunt for the knife set screws »

this is turning out to be a sort of mystery jointer….

After looking at the manual jet sent me for the jj-6 model I noticed significant differences between the jointer i have and the jointer in the manual. Probably the most important part is the fence. The fence on the jointer i have hooks to the end of the infeed table (see pics in part 1 of the blog..very similar to the delta 37-220 models) and the jointer in the manual jet sent me, the fence is hooked up at the middle of the jointer, between the two tables…sort of like the new jet jointers.

I also removed the knives over the weekend(will post pictures later) and the gib screws listed as 1/4”X1/4”-18 UNF in the manual are actually 1/4”X1/4”-28. I actually could not find a screw anywhere designated as 1/4-18, its either 1/4-20 or 1/4-28.

So I took a couple of pictures, e-mailed jet customer support and then followed up with a call to tech support. Again, very very helpful (so far jet’s customer service has been impressive). I spoke with the tech who had received my pictures and he agreed that while the tables are exactly like jet’s tables the fence did not look familiar which also means the infeed table is different since thats where the fence is attached to the jointer..he asked to have another day to research and took my number to get back to me.

Finally, while the labels on the machine clearly say model jj-6, there is no serial number (meaning teh serial number area is blank)....

So far I am calling it the “frankenjointer” until we figure out what it is….a jet with a delta fence.

thanks for looking and your ideas/comments to help solve this mystery are appreciated

-- Tampa-FL



8 comments so far

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2368 days


#1 posted 10-05-2010 03:51 AM

the fence actually looks like the rockwell/delta old fences – which are good fences, but I’ve never seen that fence on a Jet – until now.

FYI, the base the jointer is sitting on also looks like the rockwell part:



-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

2937 posts in 1805 days


#2 posted 10-05-2010 04:16 PM

I have just rebuilt an older Delta 6” jointer about a model 37-307, the only numbers on it were Serial No. 2-561,
and the motor rpm is 1725 rpm. To get the jointer knife rpm correct Delta recommended a 7” pulley on the
motor. You might want to check with Jet to get the correct rpm on your jointer knives, that could be part
of the chatter you mentioned. If I figure how to post pictures, I will put pictures of my jointer on this site.
I only paid $50 for mine, but I had to build a base and replace the bearings in the jointer knive assembly and
the electric motor, and replace the jointer knife pulley. It works great now.

-- As ever, Gus-the 75 yr young apprentice carpenter

View Camper's profile

Camper

232 posts in 1575 days


#3 posted 10-06-2010 12:08 AM

I just got off the phone with Jet and there are some interesting news about this jointer.

It is a Jet jointer 100%...not a “frankenjointer”.....

In addition, it is one of the first jointers ever made by Jet. It was manufactured in 1984. This model was produced only during that year and then was replaced by the more widely available version of JJ-6 model. Seems like I stumbled upon a bit of history here. very exciting…

The challenge is that there are no spare parts available for this and no documentation other than an exploded parts diagram. If you have been following this, I need some gib screws for the cutterhead and it seems like either I will have to “manufacture” them myself or hope that one of the newer models match the parts that were used in this jointer.

I spent a long time on the phone with Jet tech support(again props for their responsiveness and professionalism in helping me out) measuring screws for exisiting models and it seems like their newer jointers use the same screws. An alternative would be to get 3 new gibs and matching 12 screws and hope that they fit my cutter head. I am not sure what I will do but I may try to get screws off the shelf with matching pitch and diameter and grind them down to proper length. Any do’s and don’ts would be appreciated from the more experienced.

Thanks for looking and your comments

-- Tampa-FL

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 1642 days


#4 posted 10-06-2010 01:20 AM

Hey Camper, think we might drill and re tap the holes?
Howie

-- Life is good.

View Camper's profile

Camper

232 posts in 1575 days


#5 posted 10-06-2010 02:42 AM

Hey Howie, I guess that is an option but maybe before we do that, I am pretty sure that the screws are 1/4X1/4-28…I have been able to find 3/8×1/4-28 screws and if we ground the ends off 1/8” and filed them we could solve the problem.

Even if we re-tap the holes we would still need to grind off-the-shelf screws since the smallest i can find is 3/8” long for any size. Jet has 1/4×1/4 screws for their new jointer but the pitch is not specified. Tech support believes they are 28. Currently I am looking at other jointers which may have similar replacement screws where the specs are listed. I would hate to order some and not get mathcing ones.

Maybe womeone who knows their gib screw sizes will chime in…

To top it all off I do not have much experience with grinding nor a grinder so maybe you can help me with the grinding if I cannnot get the appropriate size screws.

-- Tampa-FL

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1570 days


#6 posted 10-06-2010 06:50 PM

I am pleased you are excited about the history of this tool. There’s something about its “orphanness” that I find compelling.

If you try to retap the gibs, you’d risk the new bolt heads being too large to allow the gib to bottom in the slot.

Grinding an eighth off new bolts will not be difficult, just take a little time and care. It can be done on a belt sander, but a grinder will be easier. I would put washers on the bolt, screw it snugly into the gib so the eighth is sticking out the back, and grind it flush, carefully. It never really needs to be removed from the gib thereafter, so just checking to be sure nothing prevents it from reversing a slight amount is all you’ll need.

Any LumberJocks in Camper’s area? Somebody that could lend a hand so we can all celebrate the return to good health of this collector’s item jointer?

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1570 days


#7 posted 10-06-2010 07:46 PM

Camper, check my PM. We may have solved this in one of the weirder coincidences of the month…

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View Camper's profile

Camper

232 posts in 1575 days


#8 posted 10-06-2010 10:10 PM

Hi Lee, thanks A LOT for the hook up. I just got off the phone with Avi. He will get back in touch once he gets home. This just may have come at a time when I was running out of options. (see the next blog entry).

Also, Howie(an LJ) lives pretty close to me. We actually hooked up last weekend and spent some quality time in his shop. I am sure he will be able to help me out with any mods if necessary.

-- Tampa-FL

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