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Free Wooden Smoothing Plane Plans

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Blog entry by Caleb James posted 04-27-2013 05:57 PM 3069 reads 18 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

So here we go again. It looks like you folks are having fun making some wooden planes so lets add to the fun. Here is a great little coffin shaped smoother for your collection. This is a fantastic size and a great introduction to making a wooden bench plane. The construction of the parts is a very typical arrangement and the size of wood needed to make this is much easier to find.

Here are the plans in several different layouts. The download has four pages. First one is for shop reference with measurements and lays out everything logically but not intended to be to scale. The second is for printing to scale all on one page but is on a large standard size paper of 11” x 17”. The last two pages are for printing to scale on your home printer paper of 8-1/2” x 11”.

As with other free plans I offer, I have one request and that is if you want to post these anywhere else online please link back to the original post here. I offer these as a free download but they are not intended for commercial use. Again please limit the use of this design to your personal use and please don’t be silly and try to sell them on Ebay. It is FREE! and it is © copy right protected.

CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE DOWNLOAD PAGE. (Click on the download button in the upper right corner of the new page to begin download.)

NOTE: The plans are in PDF format. If you don’t have a PDF reader Adobe Acrobat is a free software that will make it viewable and printable. Make sure where ever you print it that the “scale” is set to 100% or the measurements won’t be accurate on the print. You may need to unselect “fit to page” when printing.

If I made any errors anywhere in the plans please let me know so I can update them.

-- http://www.calebjameschairmaker.com, http://www.kapeldesigns.com



10 comments so far

View tsangell's profile

tsangell

210 posts in 1346 days


#1 posted 04-27-2013 05:59 PM

Awesome. Thanks!

View BTimmons's profile

BTimmons

2124 posts in 1139 days


#2 posted 04-27-2013 07:04 PM

Favorited! Thanks for making this resource available.

-- Brian Timmons - http://www.BigTWoodworks.com

View RaggedKerf's profile

RaggedKerf

407 posts in 774 days


#3 posted 04-27-2013 10:35 PM

OK, this is cool…thanks!

-- Steve http://vaughtwoodworks.wordpress.com

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2906 posts in 1141 days


#4 posted 04-28-2013 01:32 AM

I downloaded but forgot to come back and say thankyou so I am remedying that now.
Thank You
Thank You Thank You
Thank You Thank You Thank You!

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View Philip's profile

Philip

1110 posts in 1192 days


#5 posted 04-28-2013 01:20 PM

These look great! Will be trying this…

-- If you can dream it, I can do it!

View Don Broussard's profile

Don Broussard

1981 posts in 905 days


#6 posted 04-28-2013 03:39 PM

@Caleb— Thanks for the coffin smoother plans. I have a vintage coffin smoother with one side cracked, so I think I’ll have a go at making a new one. The replacement I had in mind was with laminating the sides to two blocks to simplify making the bed and adjustment angles (Krenov style), but your plan looks like the smoother is carved out a single block of wood. A bit more challenging but doable nonetheless.

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

View Caleb James's profile

Caleb James

149 posts in 1583 days


#7 posted 04-28-2013 04:09 PM

Don,

Yes this is a single block of wood. There are two main reasons. A laminated body will not absorb and release moisture evenly due to the glue acting as a moisture barrier within the body. Therefore your plane is more likely to not remain flat on the sole which is of course a problem. Means more turning more often.

Second, glue will ultimately fail at some point when exposed to the moisture swings of an uncontrolled environment. True it may be many years but the difference in time to make an unlamented solid body is worth it. To me it is, anyhow.

-- http://www.calebjameschairmaker.com, http://www.kapeldesigns.com

View Caleb James's profile

Caleb James

149 posts in 1583 days


#8 posted 04-28-2013 05:15 PM

Don,

I think I should mention for the benefit of everyone here is that what makes this “doable” is having the right tools. You really should have planemakers floats. A ~10˚ pull side float for the side of the wedge area. A ~10˚edge float for the abutment. A bed float would be helpful but could be accomplished with the side float or other tools with more work. The bulk of the material can be removed with chisels or drill bits.

-- http://www.calebjameschairmaker.com, http://www.kapeldesigns.com

View Don Broussard's profile

Don Broussard

1981 posts in 905 days


#9 posted 04-28-2013 07:41 PM

@Caleb—I learned something new today: what planemaker’s floats are. I had no idea that those are the tools used to make the abutment, the bed, wedge area, and the mouth. I figured that the planemaker used chisels and files to make those. I visited the Lie-Nielsen site for pricing—don’t think I’ll be buying those floats for just one plane. Thanks for adding to my woodworking knowledge base!

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

View Caleb James's profile

Caleb James

149 posts in 1583 days


#10 posted 04-29-2013 01:15 PM

Don,

I understand what you mean. Got to direct those dollars carefully. If you are adventurous you can make your own. Get a 18” x 1” x .125” flat bar of S7 tool steel. Cut in 6” lengths and make the teeth with a triangle file with the tooth angle @ 80˚. Heat treat to about 1725˚, air quench to 150˚, double temper at 450˚ at 1 hour cycles cooling to 150˚between tempers.

The bar+shipping will probably run you about $30. Use any wood you want for the handles. Drill the holes for the handle before you heat treat.

-- http://www.calebjameschairmaker.com, http://www.kapeldesigns.com

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