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Just PLANE HOOKED!

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Blog entry by CFrye posted 07-15-2013 03:38 AM 1572 reads 0 times favorited 27 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I am signed up for the 2013 Hand Plane Swap. Never have used a plane so I thought I should remedy that. Stopped at a few flea markets this afternoon… First one was closed, the second was a dry run and the third was, as they say, the charm. They had two booths with hand planes! The proprietor led me here:

and I immediately thought ‘Those are in too good of shape to be in my price range.’ I said as much just as her husband showed up with two more from “The Tool Man’s” booth. $8 and $5(prices rounded up)! Now we’re talking! We walked back to the front and I explained the Swap as I was admiring my soon to be new planes. I remembered that Half Ashed Plane blades were 1/4” thick and these I had in my hands were pretty thin (like 1/8”!). I asked, just for giggles, if they had any whet stones? She didn’t think so but we went back to the first booth (and those planes had thin blades as well) and here comes her hubby again with two more Tool Man planes! $17 and $5 this time! No whet stone however. With much difficulty I cooled my impulse to buy all four and took the two small ones. With tax they were still under $10! I figured even if I screwed them up they could be wall hangers!
One is a Stanley No. 220 (it had a tag designating the type of plane, didn’t notice till I got home that the store lady took it off. If anyone can tell me I’d be grateful.


and the other is “MADE IN USA”

My, probably flawed, reasoning for picking these two was that I could figure out how to get the blades out and the price was right. The other two were just too complicated, for now.

and this Craftsman

So I took my treasures home and showed them to my non-plane-user woodworking husband and he was happy for me. He did help me with the fine adjustment knob (I wondered what that was for) on the Stanley. I tried them out on a scrap of poplar… UGH! Swapped the poplar for a bigger hunk of pine and was still bad. I took the blade out of the Stanley and ran it over some 220 sandpaper on the table saw top, ala Scarey Sharp method, reassembled it and STARTED MAKING SHAVINGS!!!!! WOO HOO!! Switched to a bigger piece of pine with some gouges in it and planed it smoooooth, all the while listening to Patsy Cline and Eddie Arnold on the stereo! Try THAT with the belt or random orbital sander!
No hearing protection. No dust mask. Just beautiful music and shavings.

The MADE IN USA blade is in worse shape and needs more TLC.
I am officially hooked on planes. I have even used the Stanley on the miter bar (red oak) for the table saw sled I’m building (another post, soon). It worked like a dream! I am so pumped about this plane swap now! Can’t hardly wait to get started! BTW, it really took some effort to NOT take the new plane to a hunk of split firewood just to see what it’d do!
Thanks for reading. Comments and questions are welcome!

-- God bless, Candy



27 comments so far

View rfusca's profile

rfusca

155 posts in 587 days


#1 posted 07-15-2013 03:52 AM

Congrats on the good buys! Hand planing is addictive – you’ve been warned ;)

-- Chris S., North Atlanta, GA - woodworker,DBA, cook, photographer

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

3815 posts in 584 days


#2 posted 07-15-2013 04:18 AM

Yes it is! Warning received…too late! LOL

-- God bless, Candy

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

10326 posts in 1362 days


#3 posted 07-15-2013 04:23 AM

The #220 is a solid tool, C, and should serve you well for a lifetime. Congrats, and welcome to ‘The Affliction.’ ;-)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

3815 posts in 584 days


#4 posted 07-15-2013 04:42 AM

‘The Affliction’ hahaha! Smitty, I love the quote in your sig. Tried to read it to my husband… I couldn’t pronounce anthropomorphize to save myself!

-- God bless, Candy

View Don W's profile

Don W

15516 posts in 1311 days


#5 posted 07-15-2013 10:38 AM

Welcome to the affliction. Some nice shavings there.

it looks like you have a couple smoothers as well. The craftsmen looks to be Millers Falls made. An excellent tool.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View stefang's profile

stefang

13623 posts in 2078 days


#6 posted 07-15-2013 05:35 PM

I’m afraid there is no going back now. I hope you have a good place in the shop for those planes and the many that are sure to follow!

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

3815 posts in 584 days


#7 posted 07-15-2013 06:20 PM

Thanks Don W I did not get the Craftsman, just the Stanley and the one that had MADE IN USA all over it. Maybe I should say ‘I didn’t get it YET!”
Mike, I was looking a a magazine yesterday that had a plane storage/display shelf in it. I may have to reconsider getting that magazine!

-- God bless, Candy

View Don W's profile

Don W

15516 posts in 1311 days


#8 posted 07-15-2013 06:43 PM

If you go back, leave the one with the stamped frog where it sits.

So leave this one there, its not worth the time or effort at any cost.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Buckethead's profile

Buckethead

1935 posts in 612 days


#9 posted 07-15-2013 07:29 PM

Here comes another member of the work bench smack off!

First come the planes. Next the bench, then the cabinet… With additional space for new plane purchases.

We make jig making jigs, and buy planes to build boxes to house more planes.

I’m still on the bench. Cabinet is in my sights.

I watched Roy Underhill and Chris Schwartz doing a segment on hand planes. I think I might need a couple hundred.

Check it out, C…
http://www.pbs.org/woodwrightsshop/video/3100/3105.html

-- Bucket, any person that spends 10k on a bicycle is guaranteed to be a $@I almost started to like you. -bhog

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

3815 posts in 584 days


#10 posted 07-16-2013 01:35 PM

Thanks for the advise Don. Can you tell me what it is about the Simmons plane that is bad? Or is it Keen Kutter(it has both names on it)?
Buckethead so far, I leave the cabinet/work bench building to the hubby! I need to get some pictures of the shop posted. Loading the Woodright video now! I so wanted to watch it yesterday but decided to wait until today (12 hour shift in the ER can be draining). Thanks for the link!

-- God bless, Candy

View Don W's profile

Don W

15516 posts in 1311 days


#11 posted 07-16-2013 01:42 PM

Its built to be inexpensive. The frog is pressed steel instead of cast. That makes it a lot less solid. It can be made to work, but its just not worth the time. And it will never be as good as a cast frog. The cast creates a more solid bed for the iron. A solid bed is what keeps the iron from chattering.

I really didn’t know either Simmons or Keen Kutter made a plane like that. I don’t believe Keen Kutter ever made their own planes, so its probably a Simmons made keen cutter, or it has some replacement parts on it.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

3815 posts in 584 days


#12 posted 07-16-2013 02:28 PM

Pressed steel frog = bad. Thanks! Can you tell anything about the planes in the first image? They were all $30. I know one was a Stanley #4 and one was a Stanley #5. I have more pics if that would help. With my minuscule plane knowledge I didn’t want to spend that much money.
Are thin blades, like in all of these planes, worth getting for reuse in the swap(or my shop)? The blade in the wooden bodied plane, on the left of the fist image, had ‘Buck Brothers’ stamped in to it.
Thanks for letting me pick your brains Don (and everyone)! I am learning SOOO much.

-- God bless, Candy

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

10326 posts in 1362 days


#13 posted 07-16-2013 02:39 PM

You have the #220 block plane, a good start. The smoother and jack planes from the picture look to be solid tools (#4 and #5, respectively) and are pretty much required as they represent 2/3rds of the “Coarse – Medium – Fine” approach to working wood (especially with handplanes, but it applies to powered tools as well). The final third would be a jointer, or a #7 / #8. They’re big tools, and represent ‘medium’. You can do without that plane for awhile, though, if your jack plane is well tuned. But sooner or later, you’ll want one. :-) That’s the Affliction, you see…

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

3815 posts in 584 days


#14 posted 07-16-2013 02:53 PM

Thanks Smitty! The #4 & #5 have just been added to my birthday wish list!
Without the #’s how can I tell what plane is a jointer? Just look for a really big plane? Bigger than the two on the left in the pic (Holy Cow!)?

-- God bless, Candy

View Don W's profile

Don W

15516 posts in 1311 days


#15 posted 07-16-2013 02:58 PM

Pricing is tough because I don’t know the used tool market where you are. $30 for the #4 would be ok. Its not any kind of steal, but if its in good shape, no cracks or chips and the iron is decent, it will last you the rest of your life and the rest of your kids life as well.

The difference between the 4 and 5 is the age. The #4 is older. I can tell by the hole in the cap. The #5 is newer and probably not as desirable, but can still be a good user. I personally wouldn’t pay $30 for it, but you wouldn’t be getting ripped off if you did. Its another so-so price.

Also note the Stanley #4 and trhe craftsman #4 (Millers Falls made) will make the same user plane. The Stanley is worth more only because its a Stanley. Craftsman are less valued because they are craftsman, but this vintage were very good users.

I wouldn’t pay $30 for the first 2. The wood body I buy for $10 a piece around here. Again, they can be made to work if that’s what you want to do. I’ve got about 100 of those. I just think they are cool.

The transitional (steel top, wood bottom) looks like about a #26. These are more collectors than users, but can be made to use. The #26 is one of the most common. $30 is a little high for me, but it looks in good shape.

Buck Bros are typically very good irons.

You’ll get a bunch of different opinions on the thin irons. With a chip breaker they can be made to work just fine. I never replace a vintage iron unless its used or pitted beyond repair.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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